On an energy efficency drive!!

I have 4 properties for which I am responsible for the gas and electricity costs which are circa 5k per year. I have 11 flood lights, 4 gas boilers, 2 always on PCs, 4 routers, 4 washing machines, and a good selection of CFLs scattered over the properties.
I would welcome any recommendations to reduce my energy bills!
Steve
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What are the 11 floodlights for?
1250 per annum per property doesn't seem too bad to be honest.
I'd recommend buying or borrowing one of those OWL energy monitoring gadgets - they are quite revealing.
Steve
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stevelup wrote:

Seems incredibly good to me. (I spend much more than that on one property.) The OP should be awarded a green prize.
But they sound rather strange properties. No TV? No microwaves or ovens? No immersion heaters? A prison? Kennels?
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Timothy Murphy
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Not if its a one bedroom flat :)
If the properties are rented and the tenants are not directly paying for the energy what incentive have they got for switching off lights and appliances when not required?
Flood lights are probably a waste. What are they lighting, and for how long?
--
Alan
news2006 amac f2s com
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 13:04:33 +0100 someone who may be "Mr Sandman"
What type, on for how long, doing what?

There is plenty of advice on the Interweb thingy. Do some basic research first and then people may be more inclined to help you fine tune things.
The only thing I will say is that stopping energy loss is the first thing to do.
--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
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You could always stand back and think about it
e.g. what are the floodlights for ?
or better still, sell up and go and live in a cave
--
geoff

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On floodlights, if you have the usual 500W halogen lights, consider going fitting lower wattage bulbs (you can get them down to 200W in the same size bulb) or changing to high pressure sodium fittings.
You have to buy new fittings but they last a long time and the much reduced power consumption compared to halogen floodlights means that the payback period cannot be long.
I have also seen adverts for EcoFlood lights such as these, but don't know anything about them:
http://www.harrisonlighting.co.uk/lo-energy-ecoflood-42w.html http://www.harrisonlighting.co.uk/lo-energy-ecoflood-26w.html
They claim "High Lumen Output" but that could mean anything.
On washing machines, wash at the lowest temperature that gives acceptable results. There are quite a few detergents that seem to work well at 30C.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 13:04:33 +0100, Mr Sandman wrote:

Why? Flood lighting just to make the building(s) "look nice" at night is a pure waste of energy. So called 500W "security" lights are anything but, they just screw up you night vision and create black shadows that you can't see into thus excellent hiding places.

Do both have to be on 24/7? I've just taken to switching my workstation off overnight (moving a 24/7 monitoring task it was preforming to the server). There has been a 2 unit/day drop in the power consumption, the workstation is a 1GHz Athlon, the monitor was always turned off overnight.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Habit i suppose when ive need light outside, Ive just fitted floods, generaly 500watt bulbs too, am considering replacing them with these.. http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/BGA5100.html I dont really need such bright lights...the amount has increased

I need both PCs accessable remotly, i use logmein, and it wont work if the remote PC is not on.

I have a couple of company's quoting to increase loft insulation, and one of the properties needs wall cavity insulation, so will get that done.
Steve
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Do they need to be continuously reachable or could they be run up on a time switch?
If you don't need much performance or the application is somewhat embedded, there are lower power PC platforms around.

Of these, the most difference is likely to be from insulating the walls. In most properties the heatloss through the walls exceeds that through the roof and increasing insulation in the roof space if there already is some, is second order compared with addding to walls if there was none before.
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On 21/06/2008 18:14, Mr Sandman wrote:

Forward a different port from your router to each PC, configure the PCs for WAKE-on-LAN and then wake them up remotely when you need them ...
http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx
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oooo...this is interesting! I could set both desktops to hibernate after an hour of inactivity, will Wakeonlan bring a PC out of hibernation, or only sleep mode? Also, which MAC do I need, the network card on the mother board or the MAC of the ADSL router? in the case of one of the PCs, it sits behind a cable modem and a 4 way router...which MAC do I use in this case? and which IP address do I use?
thanks for this!
Steve
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On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 07:53:49 +0100, Mr Sandman wrote:

AIUI WOL will switch a PC on from off, provided there is mains connected to it.

Got me there but I should imagine it is the MAC of the NIC of the PC you want to wake up. A specially constructed broadcast packet is sent that the NIC sees and turns it's host PC on.

By "4 way router" do you really mean a 4 way network switch or hub? A "router" is a box that inspects packets passing through it and routes them in the appropiate direction, which can include ignoring, dropping or rejecting. A switch or hub is the box that connects all the network devices together in a star topography.

The IP would have to be the public one of the cable modem, the MAC I suspect is that of the PC you wish to wake up. Note you will need to set up the cable modem to forward the relevant packets into your LAN and configure the "4 way router" (if it really is a router not a switch) to route them as well.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 10:02:51 +0100 (BST) someone who may be "Dave

I imagine it is what is called a cable router or broadband router <http://www.netshop.co.uk/productcategorydetail.aspx?CategoryIDS910 being one example.
Four internal network ports, switch, router and firewall built into one box. It has one external network port which is plugged into a separate cable modem (supplied by Virgin) or DSL modem (supplied by oneself or the DSL company).
--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
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It could be a hub I suppose, it has a cat5e from the cable modem and 4 outputs to wireless routers and PCs. Its just a small box not much bigger than a couple of ciggy boxes.
Steve
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

In the consumer networking sense, a "router" is a box providing NAT and DHCP, and often also DNS caching, some sort of firewalling, and sundry other small-network infrastructure services. A 4-port one also incorporates a 4-port switch on the "internal" side of the NAT.
This is what the OP will have.
Pete
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Pete Verdon wrote:

Check as some older ones only have a 4 port HUB.

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Depends on the PC.

The network card on the mother board.

This is complicated. You need to get a packet onto the lan which the PC will pick up. IIRC, the packet needs to contain the PC's ethernet address concatenated 16 times. It doesn't matter what else is in the packet, i.e. it doesn't matter what protocol(s) you use to carry the packet.
What you probably can't do is simply send the packet to the PC, even assuming your router allows you to. After an hour, the router's ARP cache will have forgotten the PC's ethernet address, and any attempt to reach it directly will cause the router to issue ARP requests for the ethernet address of your PC's IP address, which it won't respond to because it's asleep. (Having said that, there are now some NICs which will respond to ARP requests when asleep, but they didn't exist when I originally played with this, and they need special driver support.) Another way is to send to your LAN's broadcast address. This would result in the router sending a broadcast ethernet packet. All systems would pick it up, but as it contains only 16 copies of the ethernet address of one system, only that one system is woken. This is what I did. You will very likely need to configure your router to be able to send to your LAN's broadcast address though. Also, if you use some service such as above, you would probably need to configure your firewall to allow it through. (I just tried the one above, and it piggy-backs the wakeup on a UDP packet to the port specified on your network's broadcast address.) If logmein does what I suspect it does, your dynamic IP address could make this more complicated.
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Andrew Gabriel
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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in

This is correct, and probably the way to do it. The only minor (ahem!) complication is that the majority (?) of consumer class routers disallow port forwarding to the network broadcast address
Typically this is 192.168.x.255 where x = 0 or 1 depending on the brand of router. However, broadcast traffic to the LAN from an external WAN address is regarded as a security risk, so this may be a problem.
You may find that entering 255 in the fourth field of the target address is rejected when attempting to configure port forwarding of the UDP packet (usually on port 7 or 9). If it is the case that it's just the config screen data validation which is rejecting this, there is a way to get round this by using the TamperIE tool (Google for it - similar tools for use with other browsers probably exist). However, if the router firmware prohibits forwarding to the broadcast address, then that's insurmountable.
A bit of experimentation will help. Configure your router, then try the tool here: <http://www.dslreports.com/wakeup If you run a copy of Wireshark/Ethereal on a different PC behind the router you shpuld be able to spot the incoming broadcast traffic. If this arrives OK, there shouldn't be a problem. If it doesn't arrive, then the router is blocking it. Provided you have port forwarding correctly configured, that means you may have to try a different brand/model of router...
Hope this helps
--
Richard Perkin
To email me, change the <AT> in the address below
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Jumping on the wagon... From my own point of view Andrew, I have 4 x PC's in our shop which are left on. (paranoia about losing e-mails)
I have a permanent VPN connected between routers from home<->shop using DYNdns so I am able to directly access each machine using TightVNC via internal LAN IP address even run 4 sessions to all computers at once without a problem. From what you have said then, because in effect packets are going via VPN and router has MAC addresses locked to private IP address then WOL should work without a hitch for my set-up?
Cheers Pete
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