Oil filter change in old car - how often?

I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel, about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year- old vehicle.
What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter eventually clog up, or what?
As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years, without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)
TIA
Al
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AL_n wrote:

6000ml/6months whichever is the sooner. more modern diesels are 12000ml/12months.
You might be adding clean oil regularly but the leak is not getting rid of any of the sludge from your sump neither do you burn any sludge.
Workout how much hassle and cost to you of a seized engine compared with 2hrs max per year changing your own oil.
Go figure as our 'merkin friends say.
Bob
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Bob Minchin wrote:

Are you sure?
I am sure my 54 reg van has the oil change at around 30000 miles. I cannot find the handbook at the moment to check that. Not that I need it as there is a light comes on the dash to tell me to swap the oil and this is based on the type and style of driving that I do.
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Bloody hell - did you hit the zero too many times?
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Huge wrote:

No. I now have the manual. It's 2 years or 30000 miles and uses a SAE 5W-40 oil.
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Crumbs.
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yonder.co.uk> writes>No. I now have the manual. It's 2 years or 30000 miles and uses a SAE 5W-40

It's to keep the servicing costs down for fleet managers. Doesn't do the engine much good though.
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Mike Tomlinson wrote:

actually fleet cars doing 50k a year probably have far less wear than the shopping trolley doing 5k..
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Some Vauxhall petrol engines are 2 years, 20000 miles. So I wouldn't put it out of the realms of possibility for there to be a few vehicles like that with modern engines and oils. Though changing more often than that will probably do the engine good.
I think my Vectra (1.8 VVT petrol) is 1 year, 20000 miles, but as I do less than 6K a year it's just annual anyway.
Neil
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In article

I'm not convinced it does. Most engines outlast the car anyway these days - unless they suffer a failure like a broken cambelt or cooling system, neither of which will be prevented by frequent oil changes.
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With two or three years between servicing, it's likely to be more prevalent.
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In article

Most have a maximum time between services as well as a mileage limit - specifically for low use vehicles. But there's nothing to stop you doing a look over the engine as often as you want, rather than hoping it will be done at oil change time.
I can - just - remember when cars went from 3000 to 5000 mile oil changes. Exactly the same arguments were used then...
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Today's cars are less tolerant of under-pessure cooling systems and are reliant on anti-freeze to aid thermal transfer both in the engine and radiator. Annual coolant pressure and coolant checks should be peformed as a matter of course. Cambelt(s) should be checked as a matter of course (unless one is to adopt automatic replacement at 8 years/100,000miles) and it's probably also a good time to check oil pressure. Starter syatem checks should also be performed as a matter of course. Other systems/parts are generally mileage dependant or should be noticed and rectified by the driver as and when faults appear. Headlight bulb efficiency is possibly another check not fully covered in MOT testing which possibly should be included in an annual service. I think you are lucky to get good brightness levels much after 1000 hours of use.
Iron/copper electrode spark plugs still benefit from dressing every 3000 miles and the distributer rotor is still a better system than double ended coils or split tension systems. Unfortunately the rotor and cap do need attention each year due to erosion and corrosion and probable replacement at three years or 20,000 miles. It still gives a bigger bang, and that's what counts when doing your own servicing. It's an insignificant expense countered by improved engine efficiency and the high price of fuel.
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Cambelt(s) should be checked as a

There are a lot of cars out there that require cam belt replacement at 60,000 or even 40.000 miles so every 100,000 isn't a good idea.
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dennis@home wrote:

Most belts do 60-80k
I've not seen one snap at 40k, but had two (both vauxhall) go at the sort of 70k mark.
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wrote:

Yes, Vauxhall have had engine assembly problems.
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wrote:

A few Volvo used to have a zero tolerance policy linked to the odometer, if you went as little as 200 miles over you got bitten by a very large bill re interference engine.
On some engines if you bend valves you also damage bearings, if they are not replaced they fail some time later. Relative who believes cars are "self maintaining" did the valves, got a backstreet place to do it to save 120 (!) and in the words of alfa romeo UK "if the bearings are not replaced we guarantee the engine will fail within 12,000 miles". They were right. It did. Spectacularly on a motorway.
No wonder they want electric cars... computer controlled accident avoidance... programmers saying "now why did it do that...".
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2011 20:30:08 +0000, The Natural Philosopher

My ShiteOldToyota is a 60K/5yr interval.

The 1.8 Escrote diesel cambelt was notorious for letting go at 60K, almost exactly. This was despite Ford specifiying a replacement life of 100K. Iirc, the revised mileage was 40K, to be on the safe side. Hardly surprising, as the belt took so many twists and turns it had a really hard life. I suspect Ford based their estimations on the test lumps which obviously weren't put through the 24/7/365 duty cycles of courier vans. Mind you, Ford's previous cambelts were almost unknown for snapping, but they were simple runs for the belts.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The famous snapper of camshafts was the 2.0 ohc cortina/sierra engine.
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mine was 13 years old and about 90,000 mile when I sold it. I never had a problem.
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