New washing machine time - What sort?

Crunch, bang, power off (500mA RCD, so non-trivial) and now the washing machine is probably a goner.
Tomorrow will be time to pull it out (more trouble to wrangle it out of the cupboard space than in fixing it!) and to strip it to see just what's broken. However it's a 20-ish year old Hotpoint and probably not going to be worth the fixing.
So assuming I buy new, what do I get? What do you like / dislike / find works OK on new low temperature detergents? No rugrats, nothing weird needed, I just want to avoid future DIY work on it.
I'm thinking a simple-ish Bosch front-loading wash-only. No idea about models though,
Thanks
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Miele appear to be the appliances to have. A bit on the pricey side, but that depends on how much you value build quality.
Si
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In article <b26becae-ffa1-4f6a-9b2b-302ecf347408

We bought a second-hand Bosch Maxx three or four years ago - it's had a set of brushes and a door seal since then - both easy to do and relatively cheap.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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On 28/12/10 17:52, Andy Dingley wrote:

Hi,
Bosch Logixx range should give you something fairly solid that actually works and stays working - and easy to source parts, for a reasonable price. I have a couple of Bosch Logixx appliances (dishwasher and dryer) so if the washing machines are of similar quality it should be OK.
Or, if you can justify it - low end Miele (I have one). Washes quietly, doesn't walk around the room on spin, sensible programmes and seems to wash and rinse very thoroughly.
The low end Mieles have a similar feature set to the top end Bosches but with better engineering.
Apart from obvious stuff like using bloody heavy cast iron blocks to weight the tank down, lots of little things are quite pleasing:
Lets you open the door at any time in the start of a programme to add stuff, except under exceptional conditions like the water is *too* hot (eg 95C wash).
Lets you open the door when it has just stopped spinning rather than an arbitrary 2 minutes after it removed power to the motor.
Locks the control a few minutes into the wash and flashes a light to tell you the rugrats have fiddled (but not suceeded!) - not a problem for you, granted.
All little things but they point to a thoughtful process of design that hopefully includes less visible facets...
Cheers
Tim
--
Tim Watts

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says...

My Bosch diswasher has just packed up - again. Last week it was the relay that feeds the heater - I replaced it, and all was well, but the wife informs me that it's washing cold again.
Bother.
--
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On 28/12/2010 18:16, Tim Watts wrote:

Interesting in that I'd never have justified a Miele (we have a Bosch, admittedly very good - but seeing the list below, and considering how often we come up against the limitations you mention below, and cursed resoundedly, makes me think we should have bitten the bullet:

You'll be telling me next it *doesn't* have a loud warning beep which goes off at two minute intervals ad infinitum, to tell you the wash cycle is finished... :(

Hah. We called the engineer out to our Bosch when it was still quite new, because it was regularly throwing a wobbler during wash cycles; however he couldn't find anything wrong. We later realised that the problem was the cats jumping up on to the utility room worktop and randomly punching the touch-sensitive buttons on the front of th machine - now solved by a 600mm panel of Contiboard which sits on the top of the machine, below the worktop, and gets pulled out like a canopy each time the machine is switched on.
David
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On 29/12/10 08:35, Lobster wrote:

Doesn't beep at all!
Unlike the Bosch dryer that shouts like a demented MiL - have feeling that at least that can be shut up with a user-programming option, or maybe that's just the dishwasher - must look at the manual...
I hate shouty appliances.

OK - Miele is catproof too - unless they can hold the door open button down for 10 seconds :)
--
Tim Watts

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says...

Our Boschwash did that until I discovered the keypress combination to shut it up. Every now and then someone leans on it in just the wrong way and I have to look it up again.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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Skipweasel wrote:

The great advantage to buying a Miele, is you dint have to read or follow threads like these.
It Just Works.
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wrote:

Yes, but .......
when it ceases to work, as some day it inevitably will, you're in big trouble because service is horrendously expensive, only Miele servicemen can clear fault codes on some newer models, and you can buy a washing machine of another make for the cost of some of the fairly routine spare parts.
The quality is better than average, but I had a pump fail on one earlier this year -- impeller shaft fractured because it manifestly wasn't up to the job -- far too small a diameter and poor quality steel. I used a pattern replacement for under 60 -- the Miele part would have been about twice that by the time I got it delivered.
Miele have some dirty tricks up their sleeves, too. Main solenoid- operated inlet valve wasn't opening properly on the one in our holiday cottage. But all three solenoid operated valves are on the one block and can't be replaced individually. A repair by a Miele serviceman would have been well over 200 and not worth it on a nine year old machine, so I simply parallelled the connection to the main-wash and pre-wash solenoids and told my wife to use the right hand section of the dispenser tray for the washing powder :-).
I have two Miele washing machines in current use. Yes, I like the machines. But I don't like the company. Nice machines -- but all washing machines are a gamble. With Miele machines the stakes are higher and the manufacturer is of very questionable ethics in terms of the provision of spare parts and service at a fair price.
John
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wrote:

Miele aren't really on my list. It's not money I have to spare, and I don't like their response to the past issues with fire-starting vacuum cleaners.
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This brings me to the case of a relative. People buy Miele washing machines because they are reliable. People are scared stiff of the down time when a washing machine stops, so much they are prepared to spend to reduce down time. A sort of insurance.
A relative was contemplating a Miele. It was to go in the garage. I persuaded them to buy two mid range washing machines and stack them. The cost was still less than the one Miele.
The advantages were:
1. No washing down time. If one breaks down there is always one working until the broken machine is fixed.
2. The two are cheaper than one Miele
3. Twice the washing can be done at the same time, so no washing strewn over two days. Double the load. Whites in one, colours in the other. The full family washing is done quickly.
4. The two washing machines last twice as long as the load is shared, as they are used only half the running time of one machine. Far less wear on each machine.
They saw the logic and went for it. They are still using the same machines after 15 years. Only one has one broken down and when it did they could still do the washing.
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Excellent idea if you have the room. We could squeeze an extra one into the utility room side by side I guess but I wouldn't want to stack washing machines without some serious racking.
We went the Miele route on the last machine after the previous two lesser models blew bearings etc. After four years the Miele has been faultless and it's used daily mostly. It wasn't that costly - about 580 as an end of line from Comet. It's a major piece of machinery though - or at least, it's very heavy - but seems to have less electronics to go wrong.
E.
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wrote:

Dare to be different:
http://www.gorenje.co.uk/laundry/washing_machines
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Or buy a Yugo car?
A company that refers to the "Isle of White" on their website isn't really one I would trust very far. Even if they did buy Asko of Sweden within the past year.
John
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On 01/01/2011 22:33, John MacLeod wrote:

In fairness it is a Slovenian company. Most Slovenes do speak very good English (better than some of us even) but a translation error like that could easily slip through.
--
Mike Clarke

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I know it's a Slovenian company -- although the group now includes Asko of Sweden who actually build the ISE machines as well as machines under their own name. Once had a dishwasher from Asko -- lasted quite well. And spare parts for Gorenje aren't too bad -- they're available from UK Whitegoods.
However, not to have material properly proof-read their public website shows a sloppy attitude and, in this instance, reveals crass ignorance of geography. If they employ crassly-ignorant people in one department, they're likely to do the same in other departments. If none of their UK staff have even read the website, then it doesn't say much for them. Nor does it say much for them if they have read it! Would they ever have the competence to get a repair person to the correct address?
Slovenia is a little bit further than from the Isle of Wight than my own address in the North of Scotland, but it's only the difference between 700 miles and 1000 miles, so if I can get it right, then they should be able to. If they're selling into the UK market they should get it right.
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On 04/01/11 02:24, John MacLeod wrote:

I doubt it was the Slovenes who created the website, more likely a UK based agency. So while a sloppy website might say something about the quality of staff in their UK sales and marketing office it doesn't have much to do with the quality of the manufactured goods.
--
djc

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* It says something about the quality of the agency they employed to create the website
* In fact, the whole website is a masterpiece of non-communication
* It says something about the quality of staff they employ in England that they wouldn't even check the website, or, if they did check it and didn't notice that whopper, then they must be a bunch of plonkers.
Yes, perfectly good equipment can be let down by poor-quality representation in an overseas market, but it's usually the local representatives you have to deal with when even the best machine breaks down.
John
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