Main Telephone Connection Point

Hi All,
My main telephone connection box is in a really useless position, how
feasible is it to get BT (I presume the service provider has to do it) to
move it or add other points direct from the main line? I don't particularly
want to add extensions because a) it takes a broadband connection and b) I
would prefer the box another couple of floors up.
Cheers
Reply to
Endulini
Hi Endlini,
BT will gladly move it. The fee is steep though - in the region of =A3140 as I recall. Also they don't seem to subscribe to the concept of neat cabling. You can expect the cable to be festooned around skirting boards and architraves.
If by "other points" you mean other master sockets they won't do that - you can only have one master socket.
It's not clear from your post why you don't keep the master socket where it is and put extenions in the more convenient locations. Neither using broadband nor going up a couple of floors are good reasons not to.
The people of uk.telecom are the experts.
Cheers!
Martin
Reply to
Martin Pentreath
On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 08:28:29 -0000
If this is your NTE5A box, then legally only BT can move it ( I assume BT is your line supplier ). They charge a call out fee of about =C2=A3200, plus the work, plus VAT (I know from recent experience). Also, you will find that none of the people on BT's help desks (on Mars somewhere, I think) have been told the name of the thing is an 'NTE5A Linebox', so they will completely miss-understand what you want done.
Illegally: it only has two wires to it. The ring voltage is 40v. There are plenty of websites that will tell you how to do it. Remember: it's illegal to electrocute BT engineers, (don't know why) so don't connect it to the mains :)
Legally, you can wire an extension from it to a new NTE5A, positioned where you want it, and then ignore the old one unless you get a fault. This is what I've done in similar circumstances.
R.
Reply to
TheOldFellow
PS I should have added that the advantage of keeping the master socket and just adding extensions to it is that you can do that yourself - you wouldn't be interfering with BT's wiring. You could take the time to hide the cable properly and save yourself =A3140.
Reply to
Martin Pentreath
DIY it.
Get some telephone cable, and extend the incoming via a small screw junction box and move the master to where it wants to be.
BT will never notice unless you make a mess of it.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Easy, ring 'em up and make an appointment for them to do it. Just be prepared to open your wallet to the tune of =A3100 or more.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Very feasible, very easy - just b****y expensive!
If you're even *slightly* useful at DIY (and if you're not, why post here?) you can achieve what you want much more cheaply and perfectly legally by doing it yourself. Leave the NTE5 master socket where it is [1], but replace its faceplate with an ADSL filtered faceplate such as the one shown second from the left at
formatting link
then simply wire your normal phone extensions from the filtered connections on the back of the faceplate, and wire a dedicated ADSL extension from the unfiltered connections to wherever your ADSL modem or router is installed. Piece of cake!
[1] Because you're not officially allowed to touch anything on the BT side of that
Reply to
Roger Mills
Anwhere from 120v down to about 40v depending on how far from the exchnage you are. Ringing hurts... There is about 50v DC on the line open circuit that is also enough to make you go "ow, WTF" if attaching wires to a BT block in the pouring rain.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
The magic incantation is "internal shift" but with the trend towards minimising all BT-responsible internal wiring, they might not shift it anywhere useful.
Owain
Reply to
Owain

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