Lidl paint sprayer/ Aluminium roof paint.

I have a flat roof that is a little "long in the tooth"
I thought I would give it a coat of paint to see if I could stall the inevitable [one or two sunken its hold water].
I haven't used the paint before but iI get the impression it is both very fluid and very volatile.
I want to keep my activities on the roof to a minimum, so I suppose spraying the stuff on would be best. Lidl do a sprayer for £14-00 has anyone any suggestions/ experience?
The paints instructions warn against use on polystyrene, so I would guess that it may melt certain plastics. Also if the paint is flammable might there be a risk of a static discharge using a sprayer.
Any suggestions would be welcome.
Regards
AB
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On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 05:32:12 +0100, Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp wrote:

Is it leaking? If not and you know it's in poor condition yomping about on it isn't going to do it any good. Sunken bits holding water are not a problem, they aren't leaking!
Why do you think a solar reflective paint is going to seal it or make much difference to an old roof that will already be degraded. Bung it on a new roof, maybe. Indeed if it is solvent based and the existing felt is a bit weak or cracked the solvent will penetrate and may make matters worse.
--
Cheers
Dave.
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On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 14:56:18 +0100, "Phil L"

Many thanks for the replies.
The roof does not leak at present, however the low bits collecting water are presumably detrimental to the covering?
The roof used to be painted on a regular basis, but I have not seen to it for a few years now.
The sun and associated UV light can be quite pronounced where the house is located.
My assumption was that heat/ UV was detrimental to the roof.
The original coatings of paint have all but gone now leaving a large expanse of dark patches.
I assumed if I could reduce the heat/ UV with the paint, it may help to put off a replacement roof for another few years.
25 litres is overkill but as the house is not in the UK I would not want to run out. Squirting many coats of paint onto a roof from a comfortable distance would probably fall within my skillset incidentally.
The main reason for the sprayer is to keep off the roof as much as possible.
I have bought the paint and I could apply it with a sprayer, brush or roller I suppose.
Please don't tell me it's going to be a total waste of time :-(
Regards
AB
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I have some/little experience with felted flat roofs.
Neither do I know to what extent the board/decking is drooping but, dependent upon age, it does suggest they are a chipboard form. If so, you are right to avoid putting any extra weight on the surface; even to the extent of chancing walking on the supporting rafters. Though, you could use a couple of planks across the rafting.
If the droop is pronounced, any water collection will accelerate the process due to the weight; discounting the effects of any frost. In which case, paint will not prevent further drooping and any subsequent tearing.
The decking is, more likely, to be subject to the changes in internal atmosphere rather than the external.
Should you decide upon having the roof replaced consider marine ply else if applicable, converted to a slate/tile roof.
...Ray.
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wrote:

Thank you, you are quite right, it is chipboard. At least this was what was used on the original roof some thirty years back and I would suspect that although the top surface is a different material now, the chipboard approach is the same.
From my limited experience with flat roofs I suppose I knew that the act of merely painting it would not be of any truly significant benefit, I really wanted a few people to reply saying what a marvelous solution it was, second in effect only to a brand new roof :-( I think I will stick the paint on for now, if physical damage to the sunken bits occurs then maybe I can get a local roofer to repair the damage and replace the individual board[s] that droop. Since starting my enquiries it seems that this is an option adopted by some people in the locality.
Most of the roof seems good
The roof was laid with virtually no drop at all, I suspect this does not help the situation.
The paint may help preserve the "good bits" and will provide a "feelgood factor" in the respect that I am doing something instead of just overseeing the deterioration passively.
I will give the Lidl sprayer a try and spray a meter square at a time to limit the risk from static/ fire, although I suppose the sprayers innards may dissolve rapidly?
Anyway thanks Ray, I'm very grateful for your advice, now if only it were a little more positive :-)
Many thanks!!
AB
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Many flat roofs are flat because there is no option.
--
*I wonder how much deeper the ocean would be without sponges*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp

If you wish to extend the life of a felted flat roof somewhat, use a product designed for the purpose like Aquapol. But it is far too thick to spray without sophisticated equipment. But easy enough to brush on.
--
*I have a degree in liberal arts -- do you want fries with that

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2015 12:44:23 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I don't know what the material is, it was smooth silver finished when first fitted and had a sheen that I wouldn't associate with felt.
Whoever fitted it warned of the need to keep painting it with an aluminum paint. I do not know what the paint was and I suspect that the roofing company is no longer around.
Is the main ingredient that is detrimental to the "bitumen"?? based coating likely to be sunlight?
I did a search on Aquapol, but the cost seems to suggest that it may be best to hang on until the leaks start, then worry about a new roof.
Regards
AB
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wrote:

As a preventative measure, you'd tend to use it where felt etc normally fails first - like any joins and upturns, etc.
It is pricey - but works.
I had a leak at an upturn where the felt goes under the flashing and repaired it with Aquapol, as the rest of the felt looked ok. Has lasted 5 years and counting.
--
*Succeed, in spite of management *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2015 11:05:06 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Just a thought, but I suppose it could be used to coat the "low bits". I don't think the roof is felt incidentally, it's smooth with none of the grit that accompanies the normal roofing felt.
I would think the paint may have some beneficial effect, if it reflects the sunlight.
Would a combination of the two be beneficial do you think?
I suppose having bought it, I have a bit of a bee in my bonnet as far as the paint goes, I suspect that silvery bitumen paint would have a very limited appeal anywhere else in the house :-(
AB
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