Legalities of changing sockets and brakes in England?

This is insane. Legally (like anyone pays any attention to these laws) you cannot do simple things like fitting an electrical socket to your own home, but you can change the brakes on your car. The second one is FAR more dangerous to other people!
https://www.mglondon.uk/blog/electrician/when-do-you-need-an-electrician/
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I'm not sure about that.
Bad brakes are less likely to cause:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Fire_of_London https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chicago_Fire
While poor electrical work often leads to fire.
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Nowadays only in your own home, only endangering you or your own family. But if you end up with no brakes, you could kill many innocent strangers by crashing into them. Why do you think cars are inspected annually for safety but houses aren't?
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On 12/06/2019 18:02, Commander Kinsey wrote:

While I'm no fan of Part P and I'm not defending it, perhaps you'd be less irate if you checked a decent source.
That one has obvious contradictions. Eg: Look at the entry referring to sockets in both lists. (Item 1 in first list, 3&4 in second list.)
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I guess it's one of those rules that nobody understands. A (Scottish, therefore not subject to part P) electrician told me you couldn't even replace a lightswitch in England without a certificate.
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On 12/06/2019 21:52, Commander Kinsey wrote:

The job creation scheme for pointless bureaucrats covering electrical work concerns the wiring, not the fittings.
Besides, the paperwork doesn't specify in detail what has been done, so who's to know if something is changed later?
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Indeed, it's all a crock of shit, as they say in Australia.
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[snipped spurious newsgroups, added by pet troll]
On 12/06/2019 18:16, Brian Reay wrote:

The article quoted is full of nonsense anyway.
Excuse me while I laugh "they’re a legal requirement and are strictly enforced.", yeah right.
Part P does not have a requirement to use a "fully qualified" electrician. In cases were work is notifiable, work would need to either:
1) be done by someone who is a member of a competent person scheme; (might be someone who has done a part P domestic installer course, and does not know ohms law from his elbow).
2) be done under the auspices of building control;
3) be tested and signed off by someone who is a member of a third party inspection scheme.
(the latter option being newer than the first two)
Of their list of "notifiable jobs". The following are not notifiable:
Re-wire sockets or lights that are faulty and causing the fuse to trip Install outdoor or garden lights that run off mains electricity Install additional sockets or a light switch as a spur from a ring main Install communal hallway smoke alarms or emergency lighting Install home entry systems Install electric radiators (where there weren’t any before)
There are only a small number of notifiable jobs now:
Installing a new circuit Replacement of a Consumer unit Any addition or alteration to an existing circuit in a special location (note simply changing an accessory like a light fitting or switch does not count as an alteration)
A much better appraisal of Part P without the FUD salesmanship:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Part_P
--
Cheers,

John.
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