Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

Hello,
Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to ge the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave and the sliding the flooring underneath. My question is therefore, what is th best way to cut the architrave? Are there any special saws for this o do you just risk getting tons of splinters in your knuckles?!
Also, with regards to beading, I've been advised that the best way o nailing this to the skirting board is to use a nail gun as opposed t using a small hammer as this way you don't end up denting the beading Any advice?
Any suggestions gratefully received.
Thanks
-- shahmonger
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

You need a very sharp, flexible hand saw, with fairly fine teeth. Use a piece of scrap laminate as a guide, sliding the saw over the top of this bit of scrap - with one hand keeping the cutting bit flat, and the other hand pulling and pushing on the handle.

Yes, don't use beading at all - it's ultra naff!! Do a *proper* job by removing the skirting boards, and re-fitting (or replacing) them when the flooring is down.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Roger Mills (aka Set Square) wrote:

<snip>
Remember if you're using underlay to include that when cutting the door. Fortunately I remembered just before we started cutting!

<snip>
I completely agree, at the time I was grumbling about the extra work, but I'm so glad I did replace the skirting. -- Doug "Doug's cool. He's metal ;)" - Fnook Ignore the old spamtrap work address; mail me on: doug at fruitloaf dot net http://suicidegirls.com/?hungrydoug
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wrote:

I have toyed with doing this but won't it create more work when eventually you go back to carpet as there will be a big gap below the skirting?
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Not a problem - you just trim the carpet a bit fuller, and it tucks into the gap.
I've got something similar in my bedroom, but for a different reason. When I installed fitted chests of drawers, they had to be levelled to allow for an uneven floor. There is a skirting-like moulding which I then fitted to the bottom of the units. In order to look right, this needed to be square and level with the units rather than with the floor - with the result that there was a gap of up to 10mm in places. When the carpet was fitted, this went into the gap and it doesn't show at all.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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On Tue, 21 Feb 2006 23:12:23 -0000, "Roger Mills \(aka Set Square\)"

And if you are removing the skirting why not go all the way and remove the architraves as well ? Stuart
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Because it's not necessary, and would disturb the decorations. It's not just the architrave - it's the door frames as well which have to be undercut. You wouldn't want to remove *them*! Don't forget that the skirting goes back on a bit higher, thus covering any slight damage to the walls which occurs when you remove it. The same isn't true for the architraves!
As long as the walls are clear, and accessible for placing and removing wedges, and for levering the sections of flooring together, it's no problem to slide the flooring under small obstacles. I successfully fitted an engineered wooden floor (similar to laminate to install) in my hall - which has 5 doorways and a newell post to contend with - using the method I have described.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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shahmonger wrote:

Cutting round architraves is very tedious and very difficult to do well. It depends if the architrave is proud of the adjacent skirting or flush with it. If proud, then one of those Japanese style fine tooth pull saws is excellent. If flush a sharp chisel would be better.

I'd agree a nail gun is a better option - much faster if nothing else. You can still damage the beading though, unless you use the soft rubber tip protector. Have you considered a constuction adhesive like No More Nails? As long as the skirting is flat enough that would be easier.
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
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It's a real pain and be warned that if your house is a few decades old it could also be very messy, keep the doors closed to try and prevent filth going round the house. Remove skirtings to lift them, leaving the correct gap. Be prepared to do some bits of making good in the plaster and perhaps repairing skirtings, making new plugs and replacing rusty screws or nails.
But, oh, it's well worth it!
Beading round laminate flooring is something I wouldn't have at any cost, not only does it look awful (and I'm not normally one to bother about such things) but it stops some furniture from going up to the skirting, thereby losing some floorspace.
Make the most of the laminate flooring, do a good job (with proper underlay) and you'll enjoy it.
Mary
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