Advise on laying laminate flooring please.

Hi all
I am about the have my first go at laying laminate flooring in an odd shaped hallway in a bungalow.
Can anybody suggest a good diy book or web site with pictures and instructions.
I have the general idea of how to go about it but am a bit unsure about fitting the strips between doorway architraves etc. i.e. cutting the profile to fit the architrave detail.
TIA
Paul
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If you want to do the job perfectly, then start by taking all the skirting boards and architrave off the walls. Start your laminate length ways along a the hallway. Try to pick a the longest, straightest wall to give you your first row of boards. Remember to leave at least a 6 mm gap around the edges, even though you've removed the skirting.
Lay the laminate according to the instructions on the packs and you shouldn't have any real problems.
Once you're happy with the job you've done on the floor, replace the skirting and door surrounds and the floor should look as though it's been there from the start.
I've noticed that it's the gap around the edges of the flooring that gives people the most hassle, so it's best to remove the skirting and architrave and do the job perfectly right from the start. But that's only my opinion so far.
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along a

first
even
shouldn't
skirting
from the

and
far.
Agreed.
However, when I did it, being lazy, I left the skirting etc in place and used the edging strip they sell to cover the gaps. Doesn't look too bad. At the door frames, the recommended work-around is to saw off the very bottom part at the height of the laminate and slip the last piece underneath. This also works OK provided you use a thin bladed saw and work very carefully, using a scrap piece of laminate as a height guide.
David
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I agree about removing the skirting boards - but *not* the architraves. With a sharp bendy saw, and using a scrap piece of laminate (and underlay) as a height guide, you can saw off the bottom few mm of all doorframes and architraves, and slide the laminate underneath. Make sure that you leave an expansion gap under the doorframes in exactly the same way as with the walls - i.e. even though the laminate slides under so that the edge is hidden, it shouldn't go far enough under to come up against anything solid.
The skirting board, when replaced, hides the expansion gap all round the walls. Doing this is *far, far* better than leaving the skirting in place in covering the gap with beading. That *always* makes it obvious that it's a retro-fit job!
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 09:57:51 +0100, Curiosity

Have a look here;
http://www.quick-step.com/supportcenter.aspx
some tips,dont buy cheap crap from the diy sheds,invest some money in good quality product.
go for click loc,not glued
plan plan plan plan,think think think think,before you even get your tools out!!
make sure you start at the right place
make sure you have the right tools especially measuring,lvelling,squaring and cutting devices
make sure the base floor is level
joe
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 19:00:34 +0100, tarquinlinbin

Thanks all of you for your help.
I had thoughts of using cheap laminate to start with, two reasons
a. Its on a new building site so quite a lot of grit etc will be dragged in over the next year or so. I can lay the better stuff in a year or two.
b. I am on a learning curve so using cheap stuff I can afford to make a few mistakes and rip it up.
Asked for quotes for laying the flooring, they came in at 10 UKP and 12.50 UKP per M2.
Thanks
Paul
(Sorry for late reply, been away).
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wrote:

<snip>
At that price it's one job that is definitely worth DIY-ing!
You're in an ideal position if you're laying a temporary sacrificial floor until the local environment becomes more "friendly" - you can afford to make any mistakes on this floor!
Honestly, if you have the least bit of aptitude for DIY work this is one job that you will be able to complete successfully and satisfactorily. Once the measuring up and careful positioning work for the first row is done the bulk of the rest of it is very straightforward.
A jigsaw is a useful tool to have for the job, but by no means essential - all cutting could be easily and quickly accomplished using the cheapest wickes hand saws. The one thing that is near essential is the kit of tools to pull and pry the boards together (can't remember offhand what it is called).
If it's a hallway you won't have nasties like WC bowls and washbasins to fit around.
You definitely need to leave the recommended expansion gaps around the perimeter - these can be covered either by removing and refitting the skirting (a pain, but the neatest finish) or by using the quadrant strip. If you have to undercut the architraves around doors then use a flexible handsaw pushed against an upside-down piece of the flooring, to act as a height guide (don't forget to put the cushioning under it when doing this otherwise you'll cut it too tight!).
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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