Is CAT6 worth it for home networking?

The floorboards are up at home and I am ready to buy a truckload of cable for domestic structured wiring.
But which cable? In 15 years time, will a Dixons shop assistant laugh at me when I tell him that I want to run his megabandwidth HDTV over a CAT5e cable?
I'm leaning towards CAT6 but terminating it with standard RJ45 wall plates as an interim solution. Might pull in a few optic fibres too if I feel lucky.
Will I be able to connect phones into the CAT6 cable without a problem? (I know CAT5e is OK for PSTN.)
Also what distance should the CAT6 be separated from CT100 cable?
I know that this has been discussed in previous threads but I want to see if the view has changed now that the price of high bandwidth cable has fallen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The category of cabling is not determined just by the quality of the components used.. You can use a Cat6 system from end to end, but if its not laid and tested correctly, then it wont meet the category standard..
Having said that, in a home situation, I cant really see it making that much of a diference..
Go for Cat 6, as the cost of the cable is only a bit more expensive than cat 5... Cat 6 can handle higher frequencies (and thuis higher bitrates) than cat 5, but AFAIK there arent any applications that require this as yet..
I quite happily connect gigabit kit up with cat5e systems with no problems at all..
And yes, telephones will work quite happily over cat 6 cable, as long as youve got the right adapters..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 Jul 2005 06:02:31 -0700, Pandora wrote:

The majority of the cost of cabling is getting access and installing. The cable is cheap, bung in the best you can afford and lots of it. Think about probably uses of areas, now and future, when the babies have grown to school kids or the kids have left home. I'd go for an absolute minimum of 1 RF and two network cables to every room in the house.
I'd also make provision for moderately pain free access to the cable routes if at all possible, 3x3" or 4x4" ducts with draw strings etc.
I can't think that one needs to woory undely about keeping CT100 away from network cabling. The regs have somethings to say about low volatge stuff and mains though, not the same compartment in ducting and > 50mm (or is 100mm?) separation without a barrier.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Be smart and put in plastic trunking (or whatever it's called) in a structured manner. That way you won't have to worry about what to do when your wiring needs an upgrade. This guy for example won't have any problems rewiring his house:
http://mhuys.free.fr/chantier/murscloisons/gaines3.htm
I however will, despite the fact that my house was wired from scratch two years ago, before I bought it. All my electric wires are well and truly fixed and can't be pulled a mm either way, probably making any future rewiring a complete nightmare, although hopefully that won't be my problem then :-( ...
Pandora wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have never understood why modern houses don't come with artificial ceilings, as fitted in most offices thse days?
That way pipes, cables and ducts can simply be routed without having to lift floorboards or cut/drill joists.
Unfortunately, in out house the ceilings are too low, otherwise I would have done this when we moved in.
sponix
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@email.com (s--p--o--n--i--x) wrote:

Precisely.
Two things:
Houses are usually given planning permission which has a stipulation about overall height or height-to-ridge. If you have to allow an extra six inches (or whatever) on each floor for the false ceiling, then this ridge height could become excessive.
A taller house (for the same floor area) costs more to build.
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Two free issues: http://www.livtech.co.uk/ Living With Technology
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pandora wrote:

Yes.
The world is going wireless.
Save yourself all the hassle and buy some 54Mb wireless networking gear and some DECT 'phones.

--
Steve Jones
I.S.Technology Ltd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 14:51:15 +0100, Steve Jones wrote:

But makes sure you configure it correctly and follow all the security advice.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Spoilsport. There are three open ones that I use for few minutes every few days when I am shopping that I find quite useful.
I did think about changing the password on one of them but decided against it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And hope that not too many people are doing the same thing nearby;)....
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Jones wrote:

No, the consumer world is going wireless, but its a far less resilient technology than wires...or optical fibres.
Which is why real engineers trying to do real broadband laugh at wireless most, then twisted pair, but go all glowy when they talk monomode fiber..:-)

waste of money.
Ive got 6 20 quid phones on a 300 quid PABX coupled to doorphones, and CAT 5 everywhere.
No interference, no neighbours snooping my conversations or my networks and rock solid performance.
And because its unfashionable, you can get wired broadband routers for peanuts. And analog phones AND analog PABX's..
You can get more data down one fiber than you can down the entire radio spectrum of the world..
But wahetever you put in today will be oboslete tomorrow, which is why I put in what is obsolescent today but still totally adequate for my current and projected future needs.
The money I save will go on whatever technology is obsolesecent in 10 years time when I need to upgrade :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Jones wrote:

Yes, but forget wireless at your "core". If you have the chance to get your house wired properly then do that. Wireless is great for convenience and no doubt you will put in a wireless access point as well, but I *guarantee* that you will *truly* regret not putting down a few wires if you have the chance to do so.
I have three wireless access points at my house, two Linksys WRT54GS running firmware from www.sveasoft.com for my "home" network, and a Cisco Aironet 350 connected to a Cisco 3002 VPN router for my "work" connectivity, and I can seamlessly switch between the two from my PC while sitting in my comfortable couch in my livingroom (different SSIDs and channels). While I can stream MP3s and XVID movies over the .11g home network, it's inadequate for other video formats like for streaming video from my Nebula TV server (www.nebula-electronics.com) to other PCs in my house.
Unfortunately when my house was refurbished the developer did not have the foresight to wire my place properly, and this is really biting me now. So in the very near future I will be starting the somewhat messy job of cutting plasterboard walls and lifting floorboards to be able to even get gigabit speeds to wherever I would need it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cs wrote:

I don't agree. For me, and most people, WiFi is perfectly adequate, just as DECT phones are. Drilling holes in ceilings is a thing of the past, TG.
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail (<80k only): tim /at/ birdsnest.maths.tcd.ie
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 13:58:31 +0100,it is alleged that Timothy Murphy

This is why both options are available, opinions sharply differ.
I have DECT phones, but they're no longer actually _needed_ since I installed cat5 everywhere last month, they'll be going in the bin[1] as soon as I find some decent wired phones.
WiFi to me is an excellent idea for laptops, but fixed pcs will get a nice cat5e patch cable into the wall.
[1] They're cheap and nasty ones, wouldn't sell them because it wouldn't be a nice thing to do to someone, and yes, the plastic parts will be going in the recycle bin.
--
The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those
which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chip wrote:

Everywhere? In the garden? In the loo? In the attic?
In any case, what rational reason do you have for preferring wired phones?
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail (<80k only): tim /at/ birdsnest.maths.tcd.ie
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is only one reason - you can find the bl**dy things. Other than that they are inferior!
Bob Mannix
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 10:47:14 UTC, Timothy Murphy
I have one ISDN and one POTS line. I have a phone in each room. I plan to use MSN or DDI to allow different rooms to ring on selected numbers being called. I want distinctive ring for each member of the family. I want intelligent route selection.
A few DECT phones really aren't the solution. And being able to take a DECT phone into the loo is a red herring; it only works if you always take the phone with you on every visit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Eager wrote:

I'm completely baffled by this. Do you both have shares in a CAT6 company? If you have that many extension points, presumably you have to carry the phone around with you, and plug it in? (You surely don't have 3 phones in the living-room?)
Did it not occur to you when you were digging up the garden to put in a telephone cable, that there is a simpler way?
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail (<80k only): tim /at/ birdsnest.maths.tcd.ie
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 12:55:44 UTC, Timothy Murphy

You didn't read what I said. One of the ones in the living room is by the TV, in case we get a Sky box. The other two are on opposite sides of the room, so that we don't have to trail wires if we move the room round.
The concept of having a plug in phone extends to plugging in MORE THAN ONE PHONE. Do you understand what we meant by MSN? Multiple numbers...so that different family members can have their own phone. DECT doesn't hack it when there are multiple extensions from (in my case) three lines and ten numbers.
This house is big, and rambling. It's nice to phone people elsewhere in the house. And have a doorphone you can answer in any room. And release the door lock without going downstairs (possibly from the attic).
As for networking...wired is easier, more reliable (we have thick walls) and faster. And more secure.
How much does Cat5e cost wnyway? A couple of reels cost me 50 quid. The sockets are a maximum of a fiver. Compare that to wireless interfaces and the costs look good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 13:55:44 +0100, Timothy Murphy

Nope.
Nope
Just one.

I had somebody else do the digging in the garden. Trunking was installed and I can run any signal cables in it.
--

.andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.