OTish fibre broadband,home networking etc

Today is the day our high speed broadband went live. I got 44Mbps earlier this morning, same for Wifey. Our son, though, struggles to get 3Mbps download - but 12Mbps upload, which seems odd.
We use homeplugs (yeah, I know) because solid, thick granite walls completely bollix wireless signals. Router is connected directly to BT main socket, and feeds a homeplug. There is another homeplug in the kitchen, to which our (self and wife) laptops connect, wirelessly.
Son is in another room, and his desktop is hard wired to another homeplug, yet our downloads are far faster than his.
My little Tosh netbook is W98, Wifey Tosh laptop W7 and son desktop W8.1
Why might son's download connection be so slow?
I suppose I could buy a long CAT5 cable and connect his desktop directly to router? We have swapped the homeplugs around, but son's connection remains poor.
--
Graeme

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News wrote:

First, I'd temporarily plug your machine, and your son's machine direct into the router with a cat5, unplig the powerline stuff then do a speedtest on each (not at same time, obv.) from there you have a better idea of the speed you're aiming for on each machine, and whether son's PC itself has a problem rather than the method of connection ...
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Right Guys, you have all said the same thing. I do have more than enough CAT5 cable, but only in two pieces. Yes, I have a joiner but can I find it? Not a chance.
Plan B. Found a reel of phone cable, which enabled me to bring the router down to his desktop. A bit of a bodge, but it works. Son's speed immediately shot up to 44Mbps, hard wired to the router. Hard wired Wifey's laptop, and she almost had an orgasm. 74Mbps. My little Tosh shows 25Mbps, but that is probably because the other two are so excited they're trying YouTube, games and all sorts.
So, the answer is obviously some hard wiring, or at the least move the main BT socket downstairs, to be next to son's desktop. The good news is I now know exactly what the problem is, and how to fix it.
Interestingly, the homeplugs are now all unplugged, and I have just disconnected CAT5 from Wifey's laptop and my netbook, so we're both picking up wireless direct from the router (which is now closer than it used to be). My speed it 20, Wifey's is 36, but her laptop has always picked up a better signal than my netbook. Assuming I can properly wire the router where it is now, we may be able to live without the homeplugs.
Thank you all, as ever :-)
--
Graeme

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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:41:02 +0100, News wrote:

Are the homeplugs on the same ring main? I tried a pair for my smart tv with one upstairs next to the router and one downstairs next to the tv and got such slow speeds that iPlayer and YouTube were continuously pausing. I think this is because the signals have to go through the consumer unit via 2 MCBs. I gave up and ran a network cable in with no further problems.
--
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 16:57:30 +0000 (UTC)

I can confirm that passing through a pair of CUs will seriously affect the homeplug signal. Mine just won't work like that, but will work fine if on the same CU. Similarly, some power extensions will block the signal, I believe it's to do with the surge protectors built in to some of them. Try plugging them directly into the socket in the wall. Then get rid of the homeplugs anyway!
--
Davey.

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The home wiring does affect things. If some home plugs are on different circuits this might be why there is the problem. Short of rewiring then house, I think a bit of CAT5 is going to be the answer.
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From KT24 in Surrey

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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:41:02 +0100, News wrote:

Try your machine in his location, and (ideally) his machine in yours. That'll show you if the problem is machine or connection.
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:41:02 +0100, News wrote:

<snip>

ly

Is the right answer and for the feed to the AP in the kitchen. If that is a WiFi Homeplug bin it and get a cheap AP. Aldi have (had..) Miginon WLR-510 AP/Repeater/Client 2.4 and 5 GHz 802.11 a/bg/n "up to" 300 Mbps plug top device marked down to £14. Or Tesco have TP-Link TL-WR841N 2.4 GHz only AP/Router for £20. The TP-Link will probably do a little better for range as it has external (but non removeable) aerials but if you are in the same room as it that's unlikely to be noticeable.
Wouldn't be at all surprised if the crap being put onto the mains wiring and radiated from it is getting into the VDSL and stopping that running at it's best as well.
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It's on a different ring.
Do the decent thing and run some Cat5 cable from the router upstairs.
You say wireless is no good due to the walls - you can install more than one access point, you know.
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:: je suis Charlie :: yo soy Charlie :: ik ben Charlie ::

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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 19:04:42 +0100, Mike Tomlinson wrote:

Which is why I bought the Aldi WLR-510. It's probably wise to manually set the channel(s) used when you have more than one AP so they don't stomp on each other also bear in mind if one AP is wireless n it needs two channels to achieve the "300 Mbps". I'm not sure if the additional bandwidth has to be above the allocated channel or not. Only channels 3, 6 & 11 don't mutally intefer. I'd bung the main and wireless n cabable AP on ch 3 and secondary AP on ch 11.
Set the SSIDs and passwords to be the same on both and it should be transparent to the user that they change AP.
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I thought it was 1, 6 and 11 don't overlap.
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On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 10:15:49 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.net wrote:

have

mind if

Mbps".

allocated

on

Well spoted that man. B-) I think I was getting confused by band edges, one assumes that ch 1 center frequency is 10 MHz plus guard band above the lower band edge.
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Indeed, and I have at least two spare routers.
Thinking aloud here. There are various options. To summarise. BT main socket is upstairs, connected directly to cable coming in from roof. Router is plugged directly into BT main socket, and self and wife can pick up an acceptable wi-fi signal everywhere downstairs. Son's desktop needs a cable from router to PC.
1. Just buy a wireless dongle for son's desktop, and leave everything else alone.
2. Extend the CAT5 downstairs, and either hardwire son's desktop directly, or install a second access point.
3. Extend the CAT5 downstairs, and just move the original router downstairs, and hardwire son's desktop, with self and wifey picking up wi-fi.
4. Move the main (and only) BT socket downstairs, and move router with it.
Which is best - extending the BT socket, or extending the CAT5? Or does it make little practical difference to overall download speeds? I have sufficient BT and CAT5 cable to do either.
--
Graeme

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You can't (or at least may not) move the BT socket.
The best solution, as installed here, is to run a CAT5 cable from an output of the router to your son's room. It can, like mine, go outdoors if that makes an easier cable run
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From KT24 in Surrey

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Agreed. Just trying to get together the necessary parts. Having found faceplates online, I went to the shed to find back boxes, and found three - all different sizes. Are RJ45 modules with faceplates likely to fit a standard 13 amp socket type back box, or a phone extension back box or something else? The description, helpfully, does not mention the size back box required. I could wait for the faceplates to arrive, but that just causes another delay.
--
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Ignore! Just found a description elsewhere, which quotes faceplate size as 8.5cm square.
--
Graeme

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On Mon, 4 May 2015 10:33:11 +0100, News wrote:

Yes, the face plates are standard single/double gang size. I thought you where asking about depth though. A 16 mm deep box will be pushing it, 25 mm OK, 35 mm roomy. You don't want to kink/fold the CAT5 but neatly coil the excess 6" to 9" into the back of the box when fitting the connected module and faceplate.
Also as a single faceplate can take two modules and the hardwork is running cables run two cables even if you only connect one to a module at this stage. This is where a 35 mm box comes in handy to take the excess cable.
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On Fri, 1 May 2015 13:29:33 +0100, News wrote:

more

Router does not equate to Access Point. Though most domestic internet boxes are "all in ones" containing a modem, a router, a network switch and access point. Personally I don't like this, it's a single point of failure at a key point of the system. And more often than not the best place for he modem is not the best place for the Access Point. But anyway...

Not techinically legal and the [V|A]DSL signal is tiny and prone to interference. I'd avoid runing the phone line through a relatively electrically noisey place like a home. Keep modem on short as wire as possible (make one up) next to the BT socket and run CAT5/ethernet which is designed to work in noisey enviroments to a more convient location for a small switch into which all the LAN wiring conects.

Cat5 everytime.

May or may not ... depends on the immediate electrical enviroment. If you want to wring every last Mbps out of the connection one has to take care. 5 Mbps missing from 50 is not such a big deal as 0.5 Mbps from 3.
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Options are a Good Thing. :)

I think I would be inclined to leave it there, for a number of reasons:
a) to avoid frigging with the BT side of things (you're not supposed to touch the master socket apart from removing the lower half of the faceplate to disconnect extension wiring and using the test socket),
b) to keep the analogue side of things (the BT line) as short as possible and
c) the BT line and router are probably in a more interference-free environment in the loft, being physically distanced from things like the ring main, boiler, immersion, TV, electrical appliances, etc.
If you relocate it to within the house, you may introduce it to a more electrically noisy environment with a consequent drop in ADSL performance.

by 'downstairs', do you mean the floor immediately below the loft/router?

I'd do this. Hardwire it, but if you want to add more things in future (e.g. a game console or smart TV), you can simply add a switch or a wireless AP.

no, leave the BT stuff alone, then there's no comeback if a fault develops with the line in future and the "engineer" takes exception to your modifications

as 3.

The Cat5.

You can use the Cat5 to extend the BT line if you want - its' spec exceeds that of BT (CW1308) cable considerably. Use the same pair colours (blue and blue/white) for consistency and avoid the temptation to use the unused pairs for anything else such as extensions to avoid crosstalk.
It would be best to keep the BT line as short as possible and avoid running it through an electrically noisy environment. That means your loft location is probably pretty much ideal. You can extend the Ethernet from the router in the loft using Cat5 as much as you like with no concerns about signal loss up to the maximum cable length of 100m.
Perhaps consider a Cat5 run from the router in the loft to a wireless AP on the floor below, and another to an AP on the floor below that. That should pretty much cover your needs.
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And responses from uk.d-i-y are an Even Better Thing :-)
Right. You all say extend the CAT5 not the BT line, so that is the way forward. Just to clarify, the main BT socket is in a bedroom. It was in a porch with a leaking roof, and was a mess. The line terminated in one of those brown GPO junction boxes with two rows of six terminals, from there to the main socket, which was unused (who has a phone in a porch?) and from there to a slave socket. When we bought cordless phones, I disconnected the cable from the junction box, and found it was just long enough to enter a bedroom without any splicing, so fed it in there and reattached the junction box and master socket, ignoring the slave sockets.
First step will be to run CAT5 from the router (modem/router/network switch/access point) which will be in the bedroom, beside the main BT socket, outside and down to room containing son's desktop. Once that works, I'll think about a second access point, but having read a little, that involves scary stuff like IP addresses and netmasks and other incomprehensibles.
Of course, this also involves putting plugs on CAT5, which is even more scary. I do have the kit, and even a tester, but last time, it took me about three tries at each end :-)
--
Graeme

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