OTish fibre broadband,home networking etc

On Fri, 1 May 2015 16:16:03 +0100, News wrote:

Shouldn't do. Just buy a small network switch put it somewhere that makes getting cables to it from the end points required as easy as possible. The end points being the modem router, sons PC, your and wifeys laptops and possibly an access point.
Just run a cable from each endpoint back to the switch and plug into a free port, same for the cable from the modem/router. These days switches and devices automatically sort themselves out, no need for uplink ports or crossover cables.

You need more practice. Strip 1 1/2 to 2" of outer jacket off, untwist each pair starting with orange, green, blue, brown and flatten/position each wire into the correct order forming a dense, flat and parallel set of wires fairly close to where they merge from the jacket. Trim straight across just over 1/2" from the jacket maintaining the formation. Slip into plug making sure that each wire slides fully down the right hole, crimp.
Note that there are two types of plug or rather the IPC part. One is designed for stranded (patch) cable the other for solid (installation) cable.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_connector#Sizes_and_contacts
Not that I've had any problems with the stranded type on solid cable. But these are all connections that once pluged in stay that way for months if not years.
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Dave.
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[good advice]
some more tips:

You do _not_ wire the plugs simply by colour pairs. It is:
orange/white orange green/white blue blue/white green brown/white brown

A thumbnail helps here to keep them in order

Use a pair of cable cutters. Scissors tend to make a mess of it, you don't get a clean straight cut

If you look at the end of the plug, you'll see where wire(s) have not been fully pushed home - the cut copper end won't be visible.
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On Fri, 1 May 2015 18:49:15 +0100, Mike Tomlinson wrote:

I didn't say that. That is the best order for the untwisting and laying out.

Note "correct order" I don't state what that order is.
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Your post could be construed by the unwary or inexperienced as saying that that is the order in which the wires are inserted in the plug. You even give the correct sequence - orange, green, blue, brown.
A cable made up like this will not work.

quite. My post was intended to be additional to yours, not a correction, hence the 'some more tips' at the top.
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Right, progress. Holes drilled, wiring in place, cables connected and everything works.
Just one point. At Son's end, he wants to connect PC and Playstation so, not having a network switch, I used an old 3Com hub, which works, but at a cost. Taking the connection from the wall to the hub and from there to PC and PS, speed is about 5Mbps. However, if I bypass the hub and wire directly from wall box to PC, speed is 67Mbps. Should using a hub really make that much difference? The PS was not even turned on.
The answer, I suppose, is buy a network switch.
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Graeme

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On 11/05/15 16:24, News wrote:

well the answer is not a 10Mbps hub, anyway.
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Yes, I suppose it could be a 10Mbps hub.
Anyway, panic over. Having spent far too much of my life lying on the floor, trying various combinations, plugging, unplugging and constantly running speed tests, son says don't worry Dad, I can connect the PS wirelessly. Argh! Why didn't he say that before?
However, just in case that does not work, what do I need? There seem to be countless LB-LINK 5 Port Fast Ethernet Switch LAN Network Hub Wired RJ45 Splitter BL-S515 for less than a tenner delivered. That'll do the job?
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On Mon, 11 May 2015 17:30:08 +0100, News wrote:

Not a 10 Mbps hub that you've just tried. Apart from the 10 Mbps aspect a hub is just a glorified distribution amplifier. What ever comes in on any port goes out of all the others. A switch takes note of MAC address's and switches the packets to the correct port.
Gigabit switches are cheap, personally I've slightly gone off Netgear recently and would look at TP-Link first. But TBH if you stick to a known brand and a sensible price for a 5 port Gigabit switch your won't go far wrong.
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On 11/05/15 17:30, News wrote:

Netgear GS105 is a 5 port gig switch for less than £20 - I've used the 8 port variant and they are quite respectable. Very simple, no features, just honest decent switching.
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On 11/05/15 17:30, News wrote:

almost anything will.
chipsets for 10/100/1Gnps ethernet switches exist at sub dollar pruces. The rest is just packaging
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On Mon, 11 May 2015 17:30:08 +0100, News wrote:

Bera in mind that unless it's the latest version, wireless won't be *that* fast (theoretically about 50Mb/s, in practice possibly a lot less).
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We're very lucky - the DSLAM is right outside the house. I gather that is where fibre ends and copper takes over. The copper goes from the cabinet straight to the telegraph pole then into our house. Modem is plugged directly into the master socket, and, via cable, we get high sixties or seventy. Even wireless is 40+. Needless to say, son is NOT going to be happy unless he gets at least as good a speed as his parents do :-) That is why I've been buggering around with cables etc.
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On 11/05/15 16:24, News wrote:

Yes, if it an old crap true hub that only does 10Mbit.

Basic gig switches are cheap as chips these days - I recommend the Netgear ones for basic simple gig switching.
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On Fri, 01 May 2015 16:16:03 +0100, News wrote:

I shouldn't. Use solid core CAT5, and terminate in sockets (which is easy).
Then use pre-made patch cables.
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Don't put plugs on . Terminate the cable in a wall socket. Then run a short pre-made lead to the socket. Much easier and more flexible for then future.
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From KT24 in Surrey

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
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On Fri, 01 May 2015 18:01:52 +0100, charles wrote:

But, as I said, if you do that...use solid core CAT5. Sockets expect that and the connection will otherwise be unreliable.
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On 01/05/2015 18:01, charles wrote:

Plus 1.
installing solid cat5e/6 to wall sockets and a patch panel with a krone punch down tool is by far easier to do than make your own patch cables running from router to computers.
No matter how hard I tried, I every patch cable I made had some issue with it so I now use pre-made patch cables, mostly from CPC. An added bonus is that they come in different colours so if you want to run more than one network then the colours help if all the patch [anels are in the same place.
FOr instance I use blue for wireless network Green for internal intranet yellow for the DMZ (demilitarised zone) red for WAN (wide area network which for me is the internet from Virginmedia into my firewall.
Another bonus is that I can repurpose a wall socket to become a telephone socket by putting adapters at the patch panel and wall socket (provided you have run a phone line to the loft)
I actrually have a patch panel for phopne lines directly above the patch panel for the wall sockets so use a white pre-made patch cable to link fron one patch panel to the other, so I only need one adapter at the wall socket.
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On 02/05/15 09:10, Stephen wrote:

The secret is to buy the plugs with the wire bridge:
http://www.oc3an.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/r/j/rj54_1.jpg
(Ignore the shileding, you can get the plugs in plain old Cat5e UTP grade).
It makes it very easy to get it right.

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Temporary holdup (don't have a drill long enough to clear the window frame), but that gives me time to get organised. Very many thanks for ALL the useful posts. Extending the CAT5 is obviously the way forward, and I rather like the idea of wall sockets and fly leads, but am not quite sure what to buy - I'll need the two sockets and a punch down tool to suit.
Browsing eBay, as ever.
150678372992 is a complete wall box with socket/module
221696253983 is a Pressac faceplate with single socket/module
261823468579 is a Pressac punch down tool
160458087505 is another punch down tool
160466551870 is a 50m cat5 patch cable, but probably stranded not solid
261578717000 20m of solid cat5 cable
221695875272 is two patch cable connectors, just in case ...
The question is, is either punch down tool compatible with either wall box? (I have crimping pliers for plugs, but not a tool for sockets)
--
Graeme

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News wrote:

Yes.
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