Immersion heater timer

I'm looking to put our immersion heater on a timer. It's protected by a 16 amp fuse so I assume the timer needs to be rated the same. Many of the timers I've found so far seem to be 13 amp, even though some claim 16 amp in the headline description.
Anyone able to suggest something suitable?
And a thermostat to work with it? The current immersion heater doesn't have one.
--
F


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On Wednesday, 8 June 2016 20:14:48 UTC+1, F wrote:

Domestic immersion heaters are 3 kW maximum so a good quality 13 amp timer will be adequate.
The immersion heater must have a thermostat and all new ones should have a secondary safety cutout with a manual reset. The thermostat will be inside the cover of the immersion and usually slides into a pocket so it can be re placed without draining down the cylinder.
Owain
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On 08/06/2016 20:51, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Thanks.
The immersion heater in question is at least 38 years old and will boil the tank if it's left on!
--
F




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The immersion heater in my late mother's hot water tank has a thermostat, and it dates from 1960. It may just be that your thermostat was never set properly, or the setting has drifted over the years.
--

Chris

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On 08/06/2016 21:36, Chris Hogg wrote:

I'll investigate once I've plucked up enough courage to disturb the huge amount of 'stuff' in the cupboard!
Meanwhile, anyone got a recommendation for a digital timer? Or do I use a spare I have that is rated 13 amps and which I use for switching lighting when we're away?
I would need to replace the present immersion heater switch with a 13 amp socket and put a plug on the heater lead to plug it into the timer. Any problems there?
--
F




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I went down the same road as you're going down, some years ago. My existing timer was just a plug-in jobbie that plugged into a socket in the airing cupboard, and the immersion heater plug plugged into that. But I was worried about the current capacity of the timer, and when it eventually packed up, I installed one of these http://tinyurl.com/hawlk2t mounted in one of these http://tinyurl.com/jpwz7eg . It also needs an isolating switch, a pattress and a junction box. The Sangamo is an electronic controller, wired in, so no plug and socket arrangement, and has 16A capacity which, like you, I felt was important at the time. It's probably more sophisticated than I need, as it's used just as an on/off timer at the same fixed times overnight to take advantage of E7 electricity, but it works OK and does the job. My only reservation is that the display is microscopic and difficult to read unless you get close and have it well lit, e.g. with a torch.
As an alternative to mine, you could try these purpose-designed immersion timers, also by Sangamo http://tinyurl.com/jydsg3j Might be simpler to install, easier to read, and has its own case. If I'd been aware of them, I'd have gone for the PSD version, in the middle.
--

Chris

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On 08/06/2016 22:28, Chris Hogg wrote:

Thanks, the PSD would do the job for me but it's quite expensive compared with the plug-in type! But, of course, you get what you pay for...
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F



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A potential problem with plug-in types for immersion heaters is poor pin/socket contact resulting in the pins getting hot and risking a fire, due to the high current involved. With what is in effect two plugs piggybacked, you double the chance of that happening.
--

Chris

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On 6/8/2016 9:45 PM, F wrote:

If you do go down the 13A plug and socket route (and I wouldn't recommend it) make sure you use a good quality one.
I tried doing this for a friend (long story) but had failures on plugs and sockets and ended up putting in these
https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/Plugs_and_Sockets_Industrial_Index/Plugs_and_Sockets_Ind_240v/index.html
These were on a 20A radial circuit, not a ring main.
I think you should use a "wired in" timer. No doubt Adam or someone else who knows the regs will comment shortly.
Also make sure you use suitable heat resistant flex to the heater.
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F wrote:

Use a mechanical timer. IME digital timers are a pain.
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On 08/06/2016 23:06, Capitol wrote:

I chose digital for the battery backup.
--
F



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Is the timer because the tank was boiling when the immersion was left on or for convenience to save you manually switching the HW on and off?
If you are still happy to use a switch and are just forgetting to turn it off then you might be better using something like
https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/SMTGBT4.html
--
Adam


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On 11/06/2016 10:19, ARW wrote:

No, I simply didn't want to be heating water in the middle of the day and during the night when we wouldn't use it.
--
F






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What timer did you buy?
I have fitted so few that I cannot give a recommendation. The ones I have fitted have been awkward to fit but seemed to have worked well.
Now what is the difference between these two
https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/SMNTT03.html
https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/SMNTT04.html
--
Adam


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On 12/06/2016 11:57, ARW wrote:

Volt Free contacts :-)
Peter
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On 12/06/2016 11:57, ARW wrote:

I haven't found one yet so have been using one of my existing electronic switches (bearing in mind earlier warnings about the plug/socket contacts).

The second , more expensive, one is a 'General Purpose Timeswitch c/w Voltage Free Contacts' and 'Switches up to 750W incandescent or halogen lighting/750W fluorescent lighting/100W compact fluorescent lighting (cfl’s). Not suitable for discharge lighting'. There is no mention of this with the other which is described as an 'Immersion Heater Timeswitch' rather than a 'General Purpose Timeswitch
c/w Voltage Free Contacts'.
Does it matter?
--
F




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Yes, I read that. WTF are voltage free contacts? Answer here: http://tinyurl.com/zd4kk9f A relay has voltage free contacts.
--

Chris

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I am hoping that Peter Andrew's :-) was because he was thinking what I was thinking
That are the same thing but one of them has a live connection wire pre installed to the volts free contact.
--
Adam


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On 12/06/2016 13:17, ARW wrote:

So, for an immersion heater application, does it matter?
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ARW wrote:

Both models have L-in and N-in terminals, additionally
the T03 model has N-out and SL-out
the T04 model has S-in and S-out
so for the T03 they probably cut one link and adding two others in the factory.
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