hedge

Along a hedge I have a group of five forty-year-old laylandii. Three have died, probably because they were over-run by ivy. I'm going to pull them out. But what can I put in their place? I want something fast growing. It doesn't matter about the new ones being intruder-resistant because I'm also going to have a strong fence along there.
Bill
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On 23/09/2019 02:08, Bill Wright wrote:

Datstest grwires are...leylandii.
You might try bay if you want a fast growing evergreen
Or bay laurel.
Even yew is not that slow - 4"-8" a year.
Don't plant holly. You will be dead before it grows and box is another slow grower too.,
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On Monday, 23 September 2019 06:59:55 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Well, that's tactful.
Owain
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On Monday, September 23, 2019 at 7:28:39 AM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

and it will self seed all around your garden.
I think Leylandii would be the fastest growing but make sure the originals didn't die of that disease that attacks leylandii
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On 23/09/2019 12:14, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Last time I went to the garden centre (this year) Leylandii 'shrubs' were on sale for £75 each !.
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On 23/09/2019 07:28, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Half this group will be dead before laylandii grow ;o)
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On 23/09/2019 13:20, Pancho wrote:

The Brexit half or the Remainer half ? :-)
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On 23/09/2019 13:50, Andrew wrote:

Remainers. They are so stressed out
Sreiousluy. I planet holly. The only hedge sized on is now 20+ years old. The rest are still knee high, but I hvae Bay that i need ladders to top as well as yew.
I really like my viburnum tinus. Winter flowering white, and clips to an evergreen bush or hdege
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On 23/09/2019 14:12, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My experience with Bay is that it remained quite slow growing for many years and then just took off at around 4ft/year.
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On 23/09/2019 16:23, alan_m wrote:

There is a 40 feet high one with similar spread on the other side of my back garden fence in a housing association property.
It was a potted shrub that was planted outside about 44 years ago according to the old boy who still lives in one of the flats, while the planter has long since joined the carbon-cycle.
Now no-one wil accept responsibility for it. Every year it rains berries onto my garden which germinate and grow. There are brambles growing right up through it and then dripping down onto my side of the fence, also dropping berries everywhere.
Laurel turns into an effective hedge, possibly too effective.
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On Mon, 23 Sep 2019 06:59:52 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Yes, leylandii are the datstest grwires :-) Besides, it would look odd to have something different there.
But it would be worth improving the soil where the old ones were. After 45 years it will be pretty impoverished. Dig in plenty of compost before you plant the new ones, either your own garden stuff if you make it or a bag or two from your local garden centre.
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Chris

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I agree it would have looked *very* odd had it said "fastest growers". Not at all natural.
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On 23/09/2019 07:37, Chris Hogg wrote:

Planting leylandii in the same position might be asking for trouble since whatever killed the originals may still be lurking there. Soil fungi pathogens specific to that species is a possibility and the soil will be drained of all the nutrients that leylandii prefer. I can't imagine what it takes to kill a laylandii. I can't see ivy managing to do it. Strangler fig might.
Beech isn't a bad relatively fast growing hedge. Cotoneasters have nice berries. Lonicera nitida is a fast grower and clips well. Yew is fairly slow (toxic) and holly is slower still. Chunks of about 3m all the same can look good if you have a long run of hedging and want have something less monotonous than a monoculture of one planting.
Holly will eventually get there I allow a few to grow in my hedge along with wild rose, ivy and honeysuckly. I reckon they take about 15 years from seed to get to full hedge height and another 5 to thicken out.
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On 23/09/2019 07:37, Chris Hogg wrote:

even that Kubota is going to struggle removing the stump of a 45-yo leylandii.
Tip for Bill. Leave about 6 foot sticking out above ground, so you have something to apply leverage after you have dug around the base and chopped the roots with an axe.
Or hire a bloke with a stump grinder.
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On 23/09/2019 13:54, Andrew wrote:

mini digger works
So too does fire
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On Monday, 23 September 2019 13:54:38 UTC+1, Andrew wrote:

Cheaper and easier.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=burning+tree+stumps+out

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On Tuesday, 24 September 2019 09:07:17 UTC+1, harry wrote:

slow though. A saw's faster.
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On 24/09/2019 09:07, harry wrote:

Yeah great. All you need to do is move to America where the ground is tinder dry and it will work. I have burned out a pear tree stump using potassium nitrate to preload it so it will smoulder deep underground.
His solution basically lopps it off at just below ground level and probably only really works for resinous pine trees at that. It might just work on leylandii stumps if he loads them up with KNO3 during the winter and waits until a long dry midsummer spell to set light.
Eventually I had to dig the remaining roots out anyway since they started sprouting suckers from each detached underground piece.
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Could somebody explain to the Holly in my neighbours garden that it is supposed to grow slowly? It keeps on pushing its way through the fence and it aint arf sharp on the leaf spikes!
Brian
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On Monday, 23 September 2019 02:08:57 UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

Willow. Can grow 5 ft in four months.
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PIDX8
Not sure if they will co-exist with leylandii.
Owain
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