Good old-fashioned screw

Do others agree that the old fashioned woodscrews were better than the
modern ones when used with wall plugs? The tapered thread root created more
force to wedge open the wall plug.
Modern screws tend to cut a thread and are not as effective in opening up
the plug to form a tight wedge.
Reply to
John
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 11:52:34 GMT, "John" wrote:
I presume you are referring to the screws that resemble self-tappers but it's not as if you can't get the "old fashioned woodscrews" .They are available in ,for example,Screwfix
Reply to
Stuart B
I know they are available - but many items are even supplied with the "self tapping" type of screws.
I have built up a nice stock of modern screws from Screwfix over the years - but I realise I also need to have a stock of a few of the old type. Some sort of "hybrid" would be good.
Reply to
John
In article ,
And snap off before being driven fully home. ;-)
Think the range of sizes many plugs say they can accommodate is rather optimistic. So best to use one with the biggest screw it takes.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Yes, but there are variations in wall plugs. Use Fischer Wall Plugs, size SX8, box of 100 for £2.50 on Ebay. Material is nylon, design is 4-way expansion to bite in all directions.
Better than 2-way expansion polythene which have poor retention.
Reply to
Dorothy Bradbury
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 11:52:34 GMT, "John" wrote:
No.
In the wrong place though. You need a dovetail, a tapered woodscrwew gives you a cork instead. Rather than locking into the brick, it's more likely to burst the top layer of plaster.
Use the right plugs. Use parallel plugs for parallel screws, not the old tapered plugs.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
In article , john.plant90 @ntlworld.com says...
I generally glue plugs in with polyurethane glue anyway - they /never/ come out.
Reply to
Skipweasel
I use the Fischer 6 x 30 plugs or rather the pirate Screwfix ones
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their Quicksilver screws. Turbo Golds (much as I love them) dont hold as well in plugs IME.
Good strong fixing.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
Hijacking the tread a tad, what is it about the turbo golds that makes them better than the quicksilver? (I tend to buy quicksilver almost exclusively, and wondered if I was missing something).
Reply to
John Rumm
Really fast to drive, very sharp so they are easy to start, best of all, almost impossible to split the timber even close to edges. What it says on the tin really.
Buy a box & try them out.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 18:34:22 +0000 John Rumm wrote :
They're gold so they must be better
Without looking at the book, don't the silver ones have a thicker shank and less sharp threads, so are presumably better where acting in shear, but harder to drive?
Reply to
Tony Bryer

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