flexible copper pipe "plumb sticks" or pipe bending

Hello,
What are your thoughts on these flexible "plumb sticks"? I was
wondering whether to use one as I have an S-shape to fit and its near
to the boiler so I cannot use plastic.
I've seen these flexible pipes in Focus, B&Q, etc. would they be
suitable? Are there any problems with using them?
Does anyone else sell them? The ones in the shops are 350mm which is
bigger than I really need. Google hasn't been much help. Does anyone
sell shorter ones?
If not, how easy is it to put an S bend into 22mm copper? I've never
used a pipe bender before.
Thanks,
Reply to
Fred
Why not? Just use right angles instead. Or is the difference in alignment too small for two RA pushfits?
Absolutely fecking brilliant invention! Only thing is, even the ends are thinner than normal pipe and easily deformed. No problem mating with compression or plastic push fit.
Don't think Tesco do, nor Waitrose, so no.
I haven't seen them. Homebase do longer ones.
I wouldn't bother unless you need the bender for other jobs.
MBQ
Reply to
Man at B&Q
They seem to work OK, but every installation I've ever seen with them looks like an amateurish bodge. I'm sure there may be reasons to use them, but I've never come across one.
Don't know.
Depends on the pipe bender. A proper pipe bender will make a good job, and won't collapse the pipe. A springy thingy will make a poor job and dislocate your kneecap into the bargin.
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with a proper pipe bender, it can be difficult to fabricate a piece with multiple bends in different plains close to one another. It requies practice, and a bit of experience to know what order to pull the bends in, so as to be able to fit the work-piece back into the bender for the next bend. You also need to learn where to position the pipe in the former to achieve the bend in the place you want....
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(BillP).pdfPractice on some old off-cuts first. Bend slightly further than required, it will spring back a wee bit.
Try to design the pipe layout to minimise the tortuosity of the pipework, and consider where elbows would be acceptable as well as radiused bends.
Reply to
Ron Lowe
I've used them in places where they can't be seen and I needed a complex bend, usually the last few inches to a tap. IME, spring pipe benders are useless and I can't justify a proper one. These days, I tend to use flexible tails instead. I expect the next time I do any plumbing, I'll do it in plastic instead, anyway.
Make sure the ends aren't damaged when you buy them - the copper is very soft and they're easily 'dinged' by idiots in the sheds.
Reply to
Huge
================================== You could probably achieve the same result with two of these:
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Reply to
Cicero
In article ,
A proper pipe bender requires practice to learn the skill. Some will learn faster than others. And a good one isn't cheap. But would two 45 degree elbows back to back give you what's needed?
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
If the connection is outside the case plastic in most case can be run to the boiler. Look at makers instructions.
Reply to
Doctor Drivel
I've never seen 45deg elbows.
I'm not sure whether there's enough room to use two 90deg elbows but I thought using too many elbows was frowned upon, and I thought they reduced flow or something?
Thanks.
Reply to
Fred
On Fri, 25 Jan 2008 09:29:39 GMT someone who may be Fred wrote this:-
I can't say that I have ever seen 45 degree compression elbows. However, they are available in a solder fittings.
Elbows are not as good as smooth bends formed in the pipe, as they restrict flow a little, cost money and may leak. However, a small number of elbows is not going to make a big difference in most systems.
Reply to
David Hansen
In article ,
Probably only in solder fittings.
Hence the 45 degree ones - will give a smaller minimum offset. Which you can adjust by the length of the pipe between then. With care that can be so short that they butt together.
As will adding your bendy pipe. Or any bends, come to that. Correctly soldered elbows with careful pipe preparation will introduce less resistance than any other type of fitting.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article ,
You can solder them together as a seperate job away from the pipes if you want to. But I've not had a problem doing it all in one go. And no more difficult to solder than ones simply close together, really.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article , Fred writes:
Neither have I. I've seen lots of 135deg elbows though. (ISTR the 28mm ones were rather expensive.)
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
The message from "Dave Plowman (News)" contains these words:
Maybe your argument has been sunk without trace if your on a flood plain, but we thought you were trying to argue that you were on a different plane.
Reply to
Appin
The message from "Dave Plowman (News)" contains these words:
Yes, if your (sic) underlining had appeared under the "your" that was supposed to be "you're" :-)
Reply to
Appin

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