Fitting a flue...

Hiya
We are 'electric only' dependant and have picked up a multi-fuel burner for our place which is a converted barn - ie: without chimneys therefore can anyone give any pointers for correctly fitting one of these beasts preferably without burning our place down at the same time?
Ta muchly
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On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 22:23:30 +0000 (UTC), Davey B

Should have mentioned it's a sloping roof, so some type of sloping pipe flashing will be needed unless it is considered better to come out of the wall?
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Hi Davey
On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 22:23:30 +0000 (UTC), Davey B

Not exactly a diy answer - but could I suggest that you ask your friendly local multi-fuel stove supplier ? - or even the manufacturer of the stove. To get the best out of these units you do need to fit them correctly - silly things like the diameter of the flue are critical !
When ours was installed it was OK to use a single-skinned flue (would be good in your case as you could benefit from the heat radiated by the flue as it passes up though your barn - but I think that today's regs may require a double-skinned stainless flue - the cost of which will make your eyes water <g>
I think you may find that the council's building regs people will be interested as well - and it pays to get it right both for your own safety and for when/if you intend to sell the property. You'll need adequate ventilation for the stove (fresh air for it to burn)
As to 'though the roof' vs 'through the wall' - either is possible. Many stoves have alternative 'spigots' for top or rear connection.
Whichever you decide on - make provision for sweeping the flue annually - especially if you're burning wood !
Worth taking time to get it right - we love our woodburner - works the radiators and dhw also - you never get quite the same 'positive vibes' about a gas or oil boiler <g>
HTH Adrian - Suffolk UK
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On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 23:17:02 +0000, Adrian Brentnall <adrian-the papers and the snipped-for-privacy@ambquality.co.uk> wrote:

[snipette]
Very helpful nonetheless

At a guess 4 inch

It is privately rented and we don't want to move :)

Tiss an old barn in the very northern regions of Scotland :D

Peat is plentiful here and less sooty but access hatches will be incorperated in any event.

Very much and thanks for the reply :)
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Hi Davey
On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 23:33:17 +0000 (UTC), Davey B

If it's a reasonably recent unit then you might find the specs on the web - lots of the bigger manufacturers have their details there...

Could be - sounds a bit small (nothing personal ! <g>)
5 - 8 inch is more common....

Fair enough - but you still want to make sure that it's safe from your own point of view. You can buy smoke test pellets to double-check that the flue gases are going where they should after you've installed it.

I get the picture !

Very wise. We burn mostly 'scavenged' timber - ranging from 4" diameter up to logs split from 14" diameter stuff. If you can let it season for long enough then it's pretty clean in burning - but even so, our 6" flue is about 5" diameter by the time I get round to sweeping it.... <g>
If it works with the layout of your place, I find that a dead straight, vertical flue pipe with a 't'-shaped soot trap at the abck of the stove works well. What would be the 'upright' of the 'T' connects to the back of the stove, and the 'downwards' end of the 'T' is capped off with a removable cap. (Theses are standard 'bits' available from your stove supplier).
When I want to sweep the flue, it's simply a matter of removing the cap, taping two bin bags to the bottom of the flue, and shinning up the roof with the sweeps brush (it's a bungalow). Sweep everything down the flue into the binbags, then sweep from the inside of the stove into the flue. Seal up the binbags, replace the cap and you're done for another year <g>
Have fun !
Adrian - Suffolk UK ======return email munged================take out the papers and the trash to reply
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On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 22:23:30 +0000 (UTC), Davey B wrote:

There is a fairly simple solution that only costs money.
Basically find one of the firms who specialsise in supplying flue scetionbs prescisely for this purpose, and get the double skined insulated ones that are made for the job,and can be bolted directlty to walls and timber without casuing scorching and fire risk.
These are teh bes knnes - nice briught stainless settl, variuous angles and sections, and you psoobile what a cowl on top to prevent blowback.
They also generally sell the bits to go through a sloping roof and stay watertight.
I can't remember which firm I used, but I am sure a google for 'double insulated multi-fuel flues' will find som online resources.
Installation is not hard - especially with no existing chimneys.
Strictly you should involve Building Control, but if you use the custom stuff and follow directions about what to use, how to route, and stack height and placement, any BCO who sees it will nod and say 'you should have told me, but I can't find fault with that'
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wrote:

You mean the ones you see outside chippies to take the fumes etc away .
Shift THELEVER to reply.
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On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 22:23:30 +0000 (UTC), Davey B

You have 2 ways to go. You will need so much detail explaining, that you need some proper advide.
1) build a converional chinmey, this is mine, in my barn http://www.pen-y-geulan.com/diy/chinmey.html
2) use a stainless steel doubble skinned all in one chinmey, and fix it very carefully following the makers instructions to the letter.
I would guess either answer will cost more than the stove.
You can get some expensive wood stoves that work on a fanned flue - throught the wall sort of thing.
I belive you will need building regs approval whatever you do.
Rick
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On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 14:12:12 GMT, Rick wrote:

I am not usre that a multi-fuel stiove is aloowed tio use a new chimney unless its is lined as per your second suggetsion. Mine - they insisted in doble walled steel liner anyway.

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