First time fitting a double glazed window.

My apologies if this is a very basic question but we all have to start somewhere.
I need to replace a wooden 'Georgian' style window that is rotten. I know how to get it out but have never fitted a double glazed unit before. How does the frame fasten to the wall to make it secure- the old one simply has nails driven through and the heads filled and painted over. Is this how a wooden sealed unit fixes ? Does the glass come out first and the refix it in the frame after fitting that ?
Is it a DIY or have I to call in the 'Professionals" ?
Thanks
Brian
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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com writes

you could nail it, but the normal way is to use frame fixings. basically drill a hole through the frame, then one into the wall . Insert fixing and hammer home - IME you will want to countersink the hole to take the head of the ;ug and fixing if want a neat job. Seal around the frame with expanding foam and finish off outside with bead of sealant.

Yes, in fact I'd expect it to be supplied separately - mine was.
The glazing can be fixed in various ways. best is to use glazing tape (or whatever it was called, basically a self adhesive tape) and gazing silicone. though you can use silicone or there is a mastic you spread on with knife you can use which I found total pain to use.

I've DIY-ed two, though I wouldn't suggest it as a first job. It's not particularly difficult job, though can be a bit awkward at times.
--
Chris French


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Thanks Chris, doesn't sound too daunting. I'll have a close study of units at DIY stores this week and see how they fit. If the glass and frame come as two separate pieces (which I didn't realise ) then it should be OK.
Cheers
Brian
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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

As far as the windows from Wickes are concerned (I wouls expect other DIY units to be similar), the glass is fitted (held in place by the beads) but with the protective strip covering the adhesive tape still fitted. When you remove the beads, the glass comes out - you then fit the frame, remove the adhesive tape covering and refit the glass and beads.
The trick we found was to line up the glass with spacers with the tape covering still fitted, because once the glass sticks to the tape it is not going to want to unstick and be repositioned.
HTH
Chris
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Chris wrote:

Everyone I know finds fitting the beads is the sting in the tail. They won't go in without pushing the glass into the frame with some force, which is the last thing a d-i-yer feels inclined to do. Then, yes! you hear the reassuring click but realise it's not quite high or low enough and it won't slide. Now you have to put pressure on the glass again to get the thing out. All this gets more difficult with bigger panels. If possible, cut your teeth on a small one and don't try and work alone on anything bigger than 3ft x 2ft
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Are you talking plastic beading here Stuart? I've found wooden beading easy enough to fit. No pushing clicking etc.
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chris French wrote:

Yes. The standard upvc window bead. You need the pressure to compress the rubber seal at the front before it lines up with the groove at the side. Clever stuff actually because it prevents the panel being pushed inwards.

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chris French wrote:

The way the glazing is fixed is normally specific to the type/brand of window used - it's vital to do what the manufacturer says as regards spacers/beads/tape etc as if you do it wrong, you're likely to break the unit. I once had a window broken by a professional glazier, because the who window was different to the type his firm supplied, and he used the wrong method (I found out later).
David
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I just DIY'ed a double glazed window in my bathroom - was my first one.
The main thing I'd say is to measure it correctly - this site has some good tips... http://www.u-fit.co.uk/windows/fitting/FittingGuide.asp
The only cock up I made was to order a window cill that was to shallow ( 100mm ) should have been 150mm. Managed to sort it with a bit of creativity though.
Mine came with the glass separate - in fact the hardest part of the whole job was getting the beads that hold the glass in out of the frame and fitting them back in again. I'm sure there is a knack to bead removal / fitting. Caused the air to turn very blue doing that part.
On the subject of beads ( the plastic bits that clip in to hold the glass ) I read somewhere that you should fit them top, bottom then sides. I'd say it's easier to fit the shortest beads first then the longest. Doing it this way you can bend the longest beads into place.
Cheers
ETV
snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

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Oh, one other tip I picked up was not to use frame fixings through the top of the frame as you might crack the lintel.
ETV
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This is about plastic windows, some bits are applicable but some bits wouldn't be. Just remember this when reeading it.
Wickes' Good Ideas leaflets are prety good, they used to ahve one on fitting windows, you can get pdf's here:
<http://www.wickes.co.uk/scat/goodideas
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ISTR there being a requirement to involve the local council / planning regs (?) if you`re fitting plastic windows yourself - if a company is doing it they have a different licensing system to allow them to just go ahead...
Perhaps someone else has more info ?!?
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I'd add that it's worth securely packing the window square and level first to avoid any chance of distorting the frame with the fixings, and only fix to the sides. The mortar will give a secure fixing to prevent removal anyway.
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*I was once a millionaire but my mom gave away my baseball cards

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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writes

It's their url not mine.
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raden wrote:

Store catalogue, dirty arse. :-)
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Colin Wilson wrote:

Cant see it meself? a window frame supports no load bearing on the structure so therefore can be done without involving council. Blimey! people take window frames out to get the furniture in and out of the house some times cant have the hassle of going to the council and say..."we need our window frame out can you set up the planning regs". So long as it properly fixed in place then alls well.
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Except when it does... (1940-s bay-fronted semis, for example.)
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"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
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Huge wrote:

I have a vague idea of them houses? and as they dont carry any real weight i.e just the roof felting,ect, I would imagine all the force would be on the 2b4 struts secured to the main house wall.
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Except when they do. Believe me, I've lived in one!
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"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
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the lower windows have to support the weight of the upper windows, the timber frame , tile cladding etc. For typical wooden , square or splay bay window that's not a problem for the timbers at the front of the bay. However UPVC normally requires metal supports in these front corners with in the plastic frame. if this is missing the windows can deform.
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Chris French


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