Filling gouges in a door?

My inner back door is covered in deep scratches and gouges (some up to 10mm deep) where the dog has scratched at the handle to open to door.
The door is an external one, and cost quite a lot, so I'd like to have a go at filling it. Some of the damage is on the edge of a glazed panel, so is prone to being hit.
It is currently varnished, but I plan to paint it.
What would be the best filler to use?
--
Nigel M

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nigel Molesworth wrote:

An exterior, fine finish one, at 10mm depth you may wish to apply the filler in two coats or Screwfix do a non depth dependant one i.e. .
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id 305&ts451
--
This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just noticed the "INNER back door" bit, if the door is not subject to the elements maybe an indoor filler will suffice.
--
This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
soup wrote:

Might be weatherproof, but it won't be dog proof. -- Geoff Beale Extract digit to email
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 13:15:45 +0000, Nigel Molesworth
|My inner back door is covered in deep scratches and gouges (some up to |10mm deep) where the dog has scratched at the handle to open to door. | |The door is an external one, and cost quite a lot, so I'd like to have |a go at filling it. Some of the damage is on the edge of a glazed |panel, so is prone to being hit. | |It is currently varnished, but I plan to paint it. | |What would be the best filler to use?
My filler of last resort is epoxy resin, expensive but has worked on my wooden walking thumb sticks which take a *lot* of hammer. -- Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> 17,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.net For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 13:50:29 +0000, Dave Fawthrop wrote:

polyester is cheaper.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 19:14:58 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Polyester? Tell me more!
--
Nigel M

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 23:35:41 +0000, Nigel Molesworth wrote:

Thats car body filler.
Polyester resins are what is normally sold for glass fibre layup.
two pack car body filler is t1he same resin but loaded with (IIRC) a mica powder filler.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
|On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 23:35:41 +0000, Nigel Molesworth wrote: | |> On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 19:14:58 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote: |> |>>> My filler of last resort is epoxy resin, expensive but has worked on my |>>> wooden walking thumb sticks which take a *lot* of hammer. |>> |>>polyester is cheaper. |> |> Polyester? Tell me more! | |Thats car body filler. | |Polyester resins are what is normally sold for glass fibre layup. | |two pack car body filler is t1he same resin but loaded with (IIRC) a mica |powder filler.
I find epoxy resin a better filler in that it sticks better to wood, but as pointed out more expensive than polyester. -- Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> 17,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.net For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nigel Molesworth wrote:

Aluminium panel in place, thats providing you still have the canine? -- Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 13:15:45 +0000, Nigel Molesworth
Car body filler, like P38. Lovely and weatherproof. Good for rotted sills too.
You'll want a "Dreadnought" rasp (not a Surform) for smoothing it down while it's still slightly green. Sanding it when hard takes ages.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 15:15:56 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

I agree totally.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 13:15:45 +0000, Nigel Molesworth wrote:

Car body filler. Davids Isopon,. Holts P38. Chemical metal. All the same stuff.
Ive entirely rebult rotten woodwork using this and scarp.
A damned good sand afterwards will smooth it all up.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.