Electrically conductive glue

I seem to have a bunch of laptops where the bios battery needs replacing. On these, Acer and Lenovo, the batteries are mounted within a piece of heat shrink sleeving and connected via a tiny plug on a short length of wire.
Almost every machine seems to use a different sized plug, so it seems sensible to make up new battery assemblies locally using the old wires.
Because of the dangers of soldering button cells, I was looking at the conductive glue types on ebay.
It seems there are silver based ones and carbon based types.
Is there any preference for either type? They seem to have huge drying times eg 12 hours. Would a big tube be better, or would it go off inside the syringe/tube?
--
Bill

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You can get button cells that have PCB mounting pins on them. Although you may not be able to mount these on the motherboard they at least allow you t o solder your plug leads onto them without much risk of heating up the butt on cell a bit of heat shrink to finish.
Richard
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On 23/09/2018 12:23, Tricky Dicky wrote:

There are some surface mount variety where the OP can solder directly onto the holder and not have any weak pins that can break or pierce a protective covering.
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This is a possibility, although the cells are much more expensive than those on the Poundland cards. Also, CR2016 seem to be rare in that form. I assume they often use those in the Lenovo's for space reasons.
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Bill

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On 23/09/18 15:24, Bill wrote:

http://www.smallbattery.company.org.uk/sbc_tagged_lithium_coincell_catalogue.htm
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On 23/09/18 11:30, Bill wrote:

What dangers?
I have successfully soldered batteries of all types.
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In my younger days, I would have tried soldering lithium cells, but I am now not confident enough to be quick enough with a very hot iron. Soldering the wires together to put the old plug on a new replacement battery with the wrong plug is very stressful.
For some reason, under stress I now find it hard to keep a steady hand.
The danger is said to be explosion.
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Bill

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On 23/09/18 14:42, Bill wrote:

I hasve slodered lithium fine - issue is mainly the dreadfully toxic aluminium flux.
Nicads are harder - need a BIG iron with lots of mass.
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writes

That's likely why the knees and hands are trembling, the fear of it blowing up in your face. I'd try it in a safe situation and see that they don't explode.
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On 23/09/2018 11:30, Bill wrote:

Years ago I would have used something like DAG, but I can't find any details of it constituents[1]. It was a silver loaded paint.
[1] searches have drawn a blank, does anyone have its details, or point to a link?
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On 23/09/2018 13:08, Fredxx wrote:

This was my top google hit
http://www.agarscientific.com/acheson-silver-dag-1415-m.html
DAG is derived from Deflocculated Acheson Graphite, a trademark of Acheson for their colloidal products (the graphite ones were initially produced by striking an arc between graphite electrodes under water, IIRC). Silver DAG was widely used in research labs, also for repairing the old-style electrically heated rear windscreens where the wire was sintered into the surface and often failed through corrosion or mechanical damage.
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On 23/09/2018 13:17, newshound wrote:

Many thanks, it could well be my temporary loss of googling ability but now "dag silver paint" gets hits. I could blame google of course! :-)
I associated it with silver rather than graphite. It had a zinc coating like appearance.
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There is a silver 'paint' you get to repair heated rear screens on cars. Had some success with that. Never thought to try it in place of solder, though. Never seen the need.
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writes

Having looked at the website, I associate it with price! Ooh and it uses colloidal graphite, which I've used to stiffen up epoxy in the past.
OT: I've used silver paint as an RF screen on Technics SP15 turntables that used to go backwards when one turned a nearby transmitter on. It worked for that.
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On 23/09/2018 14:03, Fredxx wrote:

Yes silver DAG is silver. I was just explaining about the original DAG. "DAG" on its own is pretty much a generic term for a colloidal suspension of graphite, usually in water although it can also be in organic solvents.
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On 23/09/2018 11:30, Bill wrote:

Spot weld some solder tags to the battery

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1NFbchHeM8

(approx 50% of the way through is the description of the battery/switch/ solenoid set-up)
There are other youtube videos showing alternative DIY methods.
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Again, if I were younger.......
I can see that that would be a useful device to assemble for all sorts of battery replacement duties.
I'm beginning to think that I should invest a few pounds in some glue and then report back.
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Bill

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CPC sell the PCB type @£1.74 ea. whilst not Poundland prices at least you could produce a reliable soldered joint compared to a dubious conductiv e paint joint.
Richard
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Well, we'll see. I have invested 99p in the Chinese economy for silver-based and a bit more in the British for 10 times the amount of the carbon type.
I will report back after the fun and after the long distance one arrives. I can always fall back on the tagged versions when it fails.
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You do realise that the carbon and silver types are more paint than glue? In other words, fine for making electrical connections but not great for mechanical ones. I don't think it'll be robust.
I think the PCB cells are the way to go...
Theo
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