Does anyone know what these grips are called?

We were in Italy over the new year visiting in-laws. They are retired farmers, and there are interesting mountains of tools both ancient and modern lying around. One of the modern ones that I rather liked was like a kind of Mole grip, but the pivot/fulcrum/whatever could be moved into four positions, a bit like a deck chair, and it allowed the jaws to open a bit wider, and to stay a bit more parallel. Has anyone seen any of these?
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Do you mean slip joint pliers? Sometimes called water pump pliers. But not really like a mole grip, and only a simple pivot, so not as much grip.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 10:52:07 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

We had a whole selection of moley-type grips in the workshop for holding joints together for welding. Ones with longer sides for clamping sills, ones with two "C" sections for clamping around box sections ... there were quite a few others that never got used.
Better than a G clamp, as you can work them with one hand, while the other keeps the pieces aligned.
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On 11/01/2019 10:52, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That's what it sounded like to me too. The other slightly clever thing about them is that they self-tighten (provided you turn them in the right direction of course).
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I have a couple of pairs of waterpump pliers - some of the most useful things I have. The things I'm thinking of are a bit like that though. Mostly like Mole grips, but having a line of pivots at right-angles to the line of the handle, rather than just one. You can pull the moving handle back against the spring, and move the pivot to another recess to widen the jaws. The name stamped into the handle was French, but I can't remember it.
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Dan S. MacAbre used his keyboard to write :

I think they are what electricians used to use to tighten steel conduits and they called them 'dogs'. The proper name, I don't know, but made by 'mole'. Two parts sort of L shaped, one fitted into the other and the pivot point was a threaded thumb screw bolt. That was adjustable to enable the 'dogs' to be used on various conduit sizes.
When worn, they tended to slip and bit your fingers - a small pair of Stillsons was much safer and gripped rather better.
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The ones I used and still use are "Footprints". That's the name of the firm that made tehm.

I found rather good set of self adjusting grips made in NZ. As the salesman said "they have to be simple - we sell them in Australia"
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charles wrote :

Sorry, yes Footprints - they used to have an outline of a footprint stamped upon them..
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On 11/01/2019 10:52, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

No I think they are different - I have seen these; indeed I was using some only last weekend. (they are very old- but still worked). They are just like mole grips but the pivot point can be moved like water pump pliers. Should be on the site where they are this afternoon so I will take a photo and post it if nothing comes up sooner.
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On 11/01/2019 11:39, Chris B wrote:

Sounds clever. I think the Mole is one of the most useful of tools. I've heard of people using them as a temporary replacement for a lost motorcycle gear pedal. The lack of parallelism at wide openings is one of their few weaknesses.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:46:46 +0000, newshound wrote:

I just bought a new pair, the others having 'disappeared'. The pair they replaced was bought from the same shop (in Brighton) over 50 years ago - it's now being run by the fifth generation of the family!
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On Friday, January 11, 2019 at 12:10:38 PM UTC, Bob Eager wrote:

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   They

so I

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Dockerills?
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 06:34:44 -0800, jkn wrote:

Of course. I was in Brighton a few times last year and ended up having an interesting conversation with two of the staff. I still have some tools I bought there 52 years ago.
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newshound wrote:

I've used them as a gear pedal when I was a lad, but they are obviously a bit awkward to use, and they wreck the end of the shaft. Mind you, the splines on the pedal shaft never lasted long anyway.
I once temporarily replaced a throttle twist-grip with a choke lever which was clearly a very bad thing to do. Fortunately, the roads were much quieter then.
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On 11/01/2019 12:28, Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

Velocettes had a square shaft.

Seems pretty safe to me. Certainly better than setting the throttle to, say, 1000 rpm and using the advance/retard lever for finer control.
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newshound wrote:

Seems dependable, but how do you make adjustments to the angle? Or do you just hope your ankle bends at the correct angle? :-)

The way I fitted it, you had to push it forward to open the throttle. A bit counter-intuitive.
I remember we were trying to teach a girl to ride. She couldn't get used to the idea that you twisted it back to speed up, and let it go forward to slow down. So she'd pull it back to try to slow down, and usually ended up accelerating into a hedge, or something. She got the hang of it eventually, though.
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On 11/01/2019 11:39, Chris B wrote:

Found a similar (modern) set with image search. For some reason adding French to the search term made all the difference.
https://img.vpindustries.fr/dolex/images/PinceEtaux_BL250.jpg
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Chris B wrote:

Yes, extremely similar to that, but the jaws were not at all claw-shaped. But many thanks for that.
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Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

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Andy Burns wrote:

Yes, that's it. Although ISTR that the bottom jaw was a bit more substantial. But I could easily have imagined that.
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