Controlling Ivy

I have Ivy growing along the side wall of my garage - I planted it when the house was new and was desperate for anything green.
I now want to reduce its density but find on cutting it back I am left with just a backfill of old dead leaves and tangled branches.
Should I really go for it and cut it down and let it regrow, resolving not to let it get as bad? Or should I thin it right back to the wall and thin out some of the tangle of branches?
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On Monday, April 15, 2019 at 4:07:23 PM UTC+1, DerbyBorn wrote:

Take ot back to the wall and thin it out
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On Monday, 15 April 2019 16:07:23 UTC+1, DerbyBorn wrote:

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When you cut it back, if you do much more that cut what's sticking out it's going to look a mess until it regrows. It will regrow no matter how hard y ou cut it back. So you choose. Basically you can either try to keep on top of it with frequent trimming, let it go out of control or cut it back hard & wait for it to regreen.
NT
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On 15/04/2019 16:07, DerbyBorn wrote:

Nuke it.
Cut it off at the roots, and paint the end of the stumps with glyphosate. And again every time it regrows.
Put something less aggressive up your wall. You'll never get the ivy marks off.
Andy
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You might find that painting the stumps with SBK might be a bit more successul. It's a scrub and brushcutter designed for such tasks.

And that's for sure
Peter
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On 16/04/2019 08:11, Peter wrote:

Yes. Ivy just laughs at glyphosate. Its waxy coat is so good that most ivy (and holly) seedlings will survive nuking rough ground with it.

Hydrangea peteolaris (sp?) is a more appealing climbing plant than ivy. Variegated ivy is less vigorous and therefore less troublesome.
There is a parasitic flower that you can introduce to normal ivy if you want to slow it down but first you have to find some with viable seed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orobanche_hederae
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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On 15/04/2019 16:07, DerbyBorn wrote:

It looks nice but I hate the stuff, grew it once and when I decided it would be too much effort to keep on top of it decided to kill it. I didnt realise that the ivy was sending out shoots through my (floor) air vents and when pulling them out some were 20 feet long. Glad I killed the thing when I did.
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