Cheapo jigsaws: OK for kitchen worktops?

Would this cheapo jigsaw at 9.99 pounds be OK for cutting worktops?
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?idx892&ts7183
I really only need a jigsaw for a "one off" job to install new kitchen worktops. So I don't want to spend too much on a tool I will probably never use again. Would going the cheapo route be a recipe for disaster? If so, are there any cheaper ones on the market from Aldi etc.
Thanks Bruce
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

No jigsaw makes a good job of cutting worktops cleanly, so a cheapo is as bas as anything else.
If its simply to remove a section for an overlapping sink, go for it. If you actually want to cut worktops to fit (without using the strip things) then you need something better. I'd jigsaw first then clean up with the side of a router tool.
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I just need to cut holes for a sink and a hob. Maybe a cheapo router would do. Incidentally, are there any suitable hand tools which could be used for such a job? I suspect a bog-standard hand saw could be used for cutting the overlapping sink hole once you made a bit of elbow room.... Bruce
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

You could drill some holes and use a plasterboard saw to get started. The straight bits are easy with a handsaw.
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wrote:

On reflection, a keyhole saw + hand saw might be a better choice. Rather than buying a power tool I might not use again. There is also less chance of me making a wrong cut and ruining the job.
Bruce
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On Wed, 23 May 2007 01:26:37 -0700, bruce_phipps wrote:

=================================Padsaw / keyhole saw blades are a bit soft and bendy and so not very practical for this kind of long cut. Since you've clarified the kind of cutting you have to do I would suggest that your original choice of a cheap jigsaw is probably the best solution. The finish for cut-outs isn't critical and can easily be tidied up if necessary. Even a cheap jigsaw can be controlled provided that you don't try to force the cut.
If you do acquire and use a jigsaw you'll also gain some personal experience and the one you proposed won't cost much more than a padsaw and handsaw if you have to buy them for this job.
Cic.
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So a keyhole saw won't be able to handle a 40mm thick worktop...back to the original plan, then!
Bruce

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So a keyhole saw won't be able to handle a 40mm thick worktop...back to the original plan, then!
Bruce

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On 2007-05-23 09:26:37 +0100, bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com said:

Buying cheap tools is a false economy. It is especially true in the case of jigsaws because there is a substantial difference in usability such as control of the cutting path of the blade with the better quality ones.
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Andy Hall wrote:

For some reason power at low revs is still expensive. Not such an issue with drills and routers.
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

indeed. the problem is getting it started. A pad saw or keyhole saw is no bad thing for that. You can even use a circular saw for straight buts starting it by pulling the guard back and letting it drift into the surface. Then finsih te coirners with a hand saw (cross cut type)
But jigsaw is probably best..cut undersize and trim back using a surform or coarse grit rasp or sanding block.
Routers are great,. but they are expensive, dangerous and make a shit load of dust and noise.

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Thanks, NP. I just need to cut out 1 hole each for 2 worktops -- one for the sink and one for the hob. So maybe a cheapo jigsaw is OK.
PS: Do I need to worry too much about "scribing" the worktop? Or can any small gaps be fixed at a later stage when tiling up to the worktop?
Bruce
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

Hire a router!
Get some MDF / Ply offcuts, use these to form the template for the router (with collar) and waz through with the router.
I tried, seriously, with a jigsaw on 40mm chipboard worktop; The blade didn't even cut straight through the board (i.e. the blade bent), and was a proper worktop blade, too.
Router ate through it, perfect cut, and with the templates, ~1mm perfect squares. I'd do it that way every time now.
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Mike Dodd wrote:

You obviously don't have a Makita jigsaw :-) They eat 40mm worktops for breakfast.
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Mike Dodd wrote:

They all do that. don't worry. Cut undersized. A jigsaw is not a precsision instrument.

Sure, if yiu have one and can stand the mess and the noise.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

You would be surprised just how well a decent one does this sort of thing compared to the average ones.

That is why you have vacuum extraction and ear defenders.
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John Rumm wrote:

No, I have a hand saw.
Less complicated :)
I had an old bit of oak worktop..and She wanted a shelf in the kitchen to put the telly on..bevelled off like the rest of the worktop.
I thought about the time to set up the router, get a beveling bit, support the workpiece, and the chances of it slipping and taking out 1/4" of oak in a second..
and ran a hand saw along the edge and spent half a leisurely hour with a Permagrit block, to get a perfect rounded edge.
Now I used to work in a factory making electric guitars once, and I love wood working machinery..when its proper stuff. bolted to the floor, fitted with all the dust killing stuff..yes, its fabulous. I'd love tpo have a spindle moulder planer thicknesser, belt sander and table router all in a workshop. Sadly I haven't the cash or the space.
Its also a world away from working in a tight corner with a hand held piece of kit and no dust extraction, and no ear muffs trying to hand carve a lump of wood into the correct shape..there hand tools often are far and away better things to use. Its amazing what a razor sharp chisel and a bit of sandpaper can do.
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

*small* gaps can be, but it's easier to hack lumps off a plastered wall than cut worktop.
Shove worktop hard up against wall and fill in gaps with one of:
(a) caustic soda (b) car body filler (c) expanding foam
Text A B or C to 8142638)225+36~193
Owain
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Owain wrote:

you owe me a new keyboard..
Actualy you forgot te realy ciorrect tow
Decorators caulk and silicone sealer.
If the tiles are a decent thickness you will find up to 10mm gaop is acceprtable.,
I had a nasty curved wall to deal with. Then I had a brainwave. I mounted up the cupboards, screwed some battens to the wall above the worktop and infilled with MDF sheet. Made it very easy to put in some power sockets too..and those cupboards are fully supported too.

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I disagree. I cut my kitchen worktop with my Bosch GST 100 BCE with a "clean cut" blade in it, and the end result was perfect. Smooth, and no tearing of the laminate.

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