Bookshelves - frequency of support

I need to put up a extensive set of bookshelves to take a large
collection of (mainly) paperbacks. In the past I've used a shelving
system similar to
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, this time they're to go along a single large wall (as opposed
to inside a reveal or similar).
What frequency will the shelves need to be supported? Bearing in mind
that this stuff (with the associated brackets) isn't exactly cheap.
Thanks
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
Depends how thick your shelves are.
You can of course provide additional support by having a batten at the back of the shelf - this would help prevent sagging over a long area by making the shelf effectively thicker.
I've seen several sets of sagging contiboard shelves. Proper wood (ok, even cheap softwood) seems to work well - 22mm x 200mm is pretty sturdy stuff. Actual calculations are probably a job for that beam program mentioned in the joist thread :-)
cheers, clive
Reply to
Clive George
to
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However, this time they're to go along a single large wall (as opposed
I have a mainly hardbacks on chipboard shelves supported at 450-500mm intervals over 3.5m. It's sagging very slightly. Spending a bit more on real wood might save on supports. One thing I noticed on some professionally-made shelving is a groove routed underneath to take steel U-channel.
I'm slightly worried by those Screwfix strips, though -- they look a bit flimsy. I used the sort (from Homebase) that have vertical slots for the brackets made of about 2-3mm thick steel. Yes, the whole thing was expensive.
Chris
Reply to
chrisj.doran
================================== I think you're looking at the wrong support system. The bracket you cited is for fixing inside a bookcase and you would need four such strips (plus fittings) for each lot of shelves.
This kind of thing would be more suitable, assuming that you want to fix shelves directly to the wall:
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are several similar systems so a browse through Screwfix or your local Wickes should give you some ideas.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
=================================== This type of support strip is usually rebated into the side uprights of a bookcase with two each side. Small brackets (Called 'Tonks fittings' - each about 3/4" square) are hooked into the slots giving support at each corner of each shelf. They used to be a standard fitting in library bookshelves because of their flexibility in use and may still be so used.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
This is exactly what I am doing.
Can I suggest these from DIY Essentials
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from B & Q there is very nice French pine flooring; 20mm thick, 145 wide, and 2m long. A pack of 4 is =A320. Expensive, but it is good wood and has a very good varnish finish on one side and it looks nice. The 'book' side of the shelf should be given a quick rub down and varnished with a couple of coats of quick setting poly to reduce the boards bowing due to moisture ingress on one side only.
I've got my supports at nominal 700mm centres. Haven't done any sums but with solid wood that thick that seemed reasonable on the 'looks right' basis.
Rob
Reply to
robgraham
Wilko do them cheaper than Wickes or S'fix though a smaller range
BnQ do them but they're a cheap knockoff.
A google on "element 32" twin slot might bring up a local supplier.
cheers, Pete.
Reply to
Pete C
================================== I've got two or three of the uprights from B&Q in use as straight edges which is a good way of getting a few reasonably priced straight edges.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
until I've put the shelves up I don't know the weight of books, nor do I know what variety of cheap, fast-growing softwood I'll be getting. I suppose I can retrocheck my figures and gnash my teeth when I realise that I've overspent by about a zillion pounds over-engineering as usual.
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 16:08:49 +0100 Clive George wrote :
Not really since you really want 3+ brackets per shelf and it becomes a continuous beam system. SuperBeam only handles simple (2-support) members.
Reply to
Tony Bryer
Doh! You take a representative sample of books with spine widths totalling 1 metre, and weigh them on the bathroom scales.
Thicker shelves look more opulent, so no harm to over-estimate. Cheap and thick, like sausages.
Owain
Reply to
Owain
----------------------------------
================================== I don't think he was very clear about his intentions which is why I offered this suggestion:
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Reply to
Cicero
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However, this time they're to go along a single large wall (as opposed
There is interaction between bracket spacing, shelf thickness, loading weight and shelf material. So theres no one answer. 2' spacing with 3/4" real wood and heavy loading (much more than a row of paperbacks causes no sag.
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Reply to
meow2222

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