Bending copper pipe to wide radius



Didn't say it wasn't, just pointing out it isn't necessary to go to those lengths. In particular, quenching is used to preserve crystaline structures which would not normally exist at lower temperatures, by super-cooling them into a preserved state. There is no such cystaline state change with copper on cooling, so it's pointless. With copper, the reverse process to annealing is work-hardening, which is triggered by flexing and vibration.
For bending a large thick piece of copper, it should be reannealed during the bending process, or bent at a temperature which is high enough to keep annealing it throughout the process. This counteracts the work hardening caused by the bending itself. One way this used to be done with very large copper pipes was to fill them with molten lead under pressure instead of sand, at a suitable temperature.
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Yes, yes...

I want you to tell me more about this, please.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure I have any more info. I got it from an old book on using copper (which is also where I learned of filling with sand to bend pipes). There was a photograph of two young factory workers bending a pipe this way. Next time I'm over at my parents', I'll dig out the book and see if it says anymore. It's hardly suitable for 'd-i-y' pipe bending though;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For very wide radius, you can use your knee, and just pull on the pipe till it just yields, then move along a bit. For anything other than very shallow bends (say a meter radius), this method won't really work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A 22mm pipe spring from a shed, mine comes from Wickes, a padded knee, and a modicum of skill, and strength. -- Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> 17,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.net For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No - they work at a fixed radius, unless you can buy other formers.

The other common ways to bend pipe is to use a spring, or fill it with sand, plug the ends then bend it to what you want.
--
*Never put off until tomorrow what you can avoid altogether *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many thanks for all the useful replies to my question. The sand & heat method did the trick...
Nigel Lord

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.