And the winner is....stretcher bond.

Tried out both stretcher bond and quarter bond for concrete blocks (sides in stretcher, rear in quarter).
Both work, but quarter bond is a lot more fiddly to keep level and so not as quick to lay.
So (especially as I have now hired a noisy dusty cutter) I have gone over to stretcher bond for the rear as well after the first four courses. Nobody will notice unless they feel the need to crawl along the bottom part of the gap between the wall and the fence.
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David WE Roberts wrote:

ok, pardon my ignorance, but what's quarter bond? (and why were you planning on that for the back?
--
Cheers,

John.

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a block overlapping the one beneath by a quarter of it's length ?
JimK
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wrote:

Yes. Apparently a valid method of bonding even for bricks. When working with bricks and turning a corner, because a brick is half as wide as it is long you can have a full brick up to the corner which is also a half brick to start the course round the corner. This maintains the stretcher (half) bond without cutting any bricks.
With blocks which are 100mm wide and 415mm long you don't get the same result. When you turn the corner you get approximately a quarter block at the start of the course. This avoids any cutting but puts you in quarter bond. It looks O.K. but it turned out to be slower to lay properly.
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