Adapting condensing tumble dryer to drain automatically

Hi all,
I'm wanting to buy a Siemens WT46W567GB (or IQ 700) dryer, see here: http://www.siemens-home.co.uk/WT46W567GB.html
It's a condensing dryer, but I'm pretty lazy and I don't want to have to empty the reservoir after every cycle. There seems to be no "official" conversion kit to let me plumb it so that the water drains automatically. I was under the impression that as long as the reservoir drawer is at the top of the machine (it is), it should be fairly easy to run a bit of hose from wherever the water drips into the reservior, and to redirect it to the drain instead. Is this basically how those kits work?
On speaking to Siemens technical helpline I was told no kit is available because "it is a self-cleaning model" (it is billed as having a self-cleaning condenser). Does that make much sense to anyone? I think maybe the condensate is somehow used in cleaning the condenser, but then ultimately it must still drip into the drawer, so I don't understand why that would make a difference.
By the way, it's going in the cellar so it has to be a consenser, there is a drain easily available there, and I know that there are other models where conversion to drainage would be easy, but I particularly like this one.
Cheers!
Martin
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On 17/01/2012 10:32, Martin Pentreath wrote:

Well whatever this self-cleaning function does, at the end of the day you're still going to have water to get rid of somehow.
My thought would be that there is likely to be a reason that the manufacturer hasn't provided for a permanent drain - something like maybe compromising this self-cleaning thingy? - and that you could bugger it up by attempting to modify it. I mean, even my little cheapy B&Q own-brand dehumidifier comes with that option, so why wouldn't a reputable company like Siemens fit it? AFAIK most condenser driers do have a permanent drain option, so I would suggest choosing an alternative model.
David
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Maybe there's not enough water to wash away the lint down a pipe, so it would just continually block?
--
Andrew Gabriel
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It happens that Martin Pentreath formulated :

The spec says -
Exhaust water pipe No
and the manual says you have to empty the condensate from the (small) drawer at the top right, so I would guess there is no obvious means by which to convert it to self drain. Best look for an alternative.
For information, our washer /drier discharges into the drum, from where it is pumped by the usual pump out to drain.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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wrote:

We've got this model, and I went through this loop, gave up, and bought it anyway. It is a heat pump condensor, and the water is flushed over the fins to wash off the lint. As Andrew Gabriel suggested, I think the rationale is probably that any tube would block up.
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 04:49:15 -0800 (PST), Bolted wrote:

Block if only the constant dribble of water is going down the pipe. How about a water level sensor in the drawer and small pump to empty it when it gets close to full.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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wrote:

Why make life harder? http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Clothes_dryer
NT
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