600W 2-stroke generator

Hello,
I bought one of these on a whim when it was in a sale a couple of years ago. I've never used it properly but on the advice of people here, I would run it with a load every now and again to make sure it was working. What with moving house etc. it has not been used in a long time. I found it whilst tidying the garage the other day and cannot start it.
Is there anything I can try to resurrect it? The oil/petrol mix has been in there a while, should I pour that out and start again?
Thanks, Stephen.
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There used to be a product called, I think, "Damp Start" wich you sprayed into the air intake for situations like this. It seemed - from the smell - to be a highly combustable product - so it probbly got banned under some regulation.
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You need to be careful. the original dampstart was just a fluid which repelled moisture, but later it also came as a film coating in a can to spray on ignition leads and terminals to stop the damp getting in.
I don't know this product you have, but it could be a good idea to drain the existing fuel out and put fresh in at least to get it going. I'm assuming its got one of those shoulder dislocating pull chord has it? Brian
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2015 14:55:33 +0100, "Brian-Gaff"
Yes.
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wrote:

Damp start is a spray which applies a plastic like film coating to what it is sprayed at. was useful in the days of weak ignition systems to keep damp from causing HV leakage from grotty distributor caps and plug leads whose insulation was breaking down or another layer of insulation where engines got splashed regularly.
Spraying it into an air intake won't do anything after it much good.
Easy start is probably what you mean, One time I believe it was mainly Ether but improper use by druggies probably has seen the composition changed. Some used to say an engine got addicted to it and would not start without. Hand cranking with a handle needed extra care as premature ignition causing a kick back was more likely when using it.
G.Harman
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On Thursday, 8 October 2015 10:05:56 UTC+1, charles wrote:

Or "Bradex Easy Start". They all contain ether to help starting. If you have a propane blowlamp, you can direct gas down the air intake to help starting.
Yes fresh petrol is best. There are volatiles in it to help starting that disappear if it is stored.
Also good to shut the machine down by turning off the petrol. The petrol in the hot carburetor loses the volatiles more quickly than in the tank.
Generally speaking, the only other thing that goes wrong in 2T engines is the spark plug.
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On Fri, 9 Oct 2015 00:25:34 -0700 (PDT), harry

Thanks. I have found this on the Halfords web site. Some google results refer to it as Holts easy start but the photos are identical, so either Bradex owns Holts or vice versa.

I hadn't thought of that. That's a good idea and would save me a trip to Halfords.

Like Chris said, I have heard this but how does it evaporate from a metal tank? Is it that the seal is not very good?

Yes, I always do this.
Thanks, Stephen.
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On Friday, 9 October 2015 09:01:42 UTC+1, Stephen wrote:

The petrol tank has a vent. In the Summer heat it lets the volatiles out.
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wrote:

It looks like Halfords sell "easy start" so I'll give that ago, along with the other suggestions, thanks.
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2015 09:59:12 +0100, Stephen wrote:

Definitely. Two-smoke mix separates over time, apart from anything else, so you'll have some really oily fuel at the bottom and plain petrol at the top of the tank.
It's probably a bit gummed up in the carb, and maybe the pump diaphragm's gone hard or even torn. But it really shouldn't be hard to get going.
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and, something else I thought of: take the spark plug out and clean/regap it.
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On 08/10/2015 09:59, Stephen wrote:

I find the jet in the carb of my (4 stroke) Honda generator gets gummed-up so, if I haven't run the gen for a long time, I need to clear the jet with a bit of wire or a small drill (smaller then the orifice, of course!). Changing the fuel is a good idea.
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2015 09:59:12 +0100, Stephen

You occasionally see suggestions that fuel left to stand for long periods loses its ability to fire up (not sure whether that applies to petrol alone, or two-stroke mix, or both). It sometimes happens with garden machinery that's been left in a shed over winter, and then won't start in the spring. The explanation offered is that volatile components evaporate, resulting in greater difficulty in starting. I've never been very convinced by the explanation, but the fact of poor starting behaviour using fuel that's stood around, remains.
I'd drain out the old fuel, use some freshly made-up mixture and also flush the fuel line with it, clean the plug outside and in, bring the genny into a warmish place to dry out any condensation or damp that might have built up in the ignition system over time, and try again.
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wrote:

Both. More strictly the more volatile components can evaporate away in anything worse than a real jerrycan.

Particularly in 2 stroke engines that can be pretty marginal starting wise at times with the worst of them.

Yep.

I have. Particularly when new fuel sees it start fine.

And there isnt anything else other than gummy stuff in the carb that would explain that result.

I wouldn't bother doing that plug stuff unless it doesn't start with the fresh fuel.

That shouldn't trouble most 2 strokes.

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On 08/10/2015 11:04, Chris Hogg wrote:

I don't see anything wrong with that explanation. Petrol is a mix of hydrocarbons with different volatilities.

+1
I would also remove the float chamber from the carburettor and clean it out (it may or may not be easier to remove the carburettor first). What happens in 2 strokes is that the petrol in the carb evaporates, leaving the two stroke oil behind as a sticky residue. As someone else suggested, may be worth cleaning the main jet too.
Check you-tube if you have never stripped a carb before, they are quite simple but when you remove the float, the spindle and the needle valve will drop out and disappear if you do it the wrong way.
My other favourite technique with recalcitrant engines is to warm up the carb with a hot air gun or a gas torch. Try not to melt the fuel pipe, but it is safe to get them quite warm to the touch (they get warm by conduction from the cylinder barrel in operation). Also OK to heat up the plug (removed) in an oven or with a gas torch. You can make this too hot to touch without gloves.
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2015 17:31:48 +0100, newshound

It is this type of generator: https://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/details/clarke-720w-petrol-generator-g720
(not meant as an endorsement of machinemart because we all know of their poor customer service!)
I don't know how easy it will be to take apart, being a cheap thing, I'm not sure if they are meant to be stripped and serviced or whether they are seen as disposable, but I'll certainly have a go and might learn something in the process.
Thanks, Stephen.
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2015 17:31:48 +0100, newshound

I can see how volatiles might diffuse through the walls of a plastic petrol tank over an extended period, or through the tiny breather hole in a petrol tank cap, but I don't see how they could escape from a sealed metal can. Maybe they don't, and it's only petrol left in the tank, possibly a plastic tank, on the actual machine that deteriorates and results in poor starting.
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Thanks. I will try these.
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2015 09:59:12 +0100, Stephen

I get many old chainsaws brought to me, last one was a Husqvarna 136 which had been abandoned 5 years previously and the fuel tank was still 3/4 full. They normally start fine.
Main thing is the check for spark with plug out.
I often preheat the plug to burn any oil residue off. Then start as normal, up to ten pulls with choke on or until it fires then choke off and part throttle. If it fires then run on full throttle, as often any fuel that has seeped into the crankcase will have evaporated leaving the oil which needs burning off before it fouls the plug.
If the plug fouls heat it again
Holts easy start is still available from Halfords but only a whiff and it doesn't work if there is a fundamental engine problem.
I too use one of these little gensets and it can be a pig to start after storage but it always goes eventually. I'm told, but not tried due to the expense, to leave them with Aspen2 mix in the tank for easier starting.
AJH
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Hello,

If you have a gas blowtorch try giving it a whiff of gas. Just position the blowtorch so that the gas is directed at the air filter and turn it on. Then try the usual starting procedure. It should start and run just on the gas for long enough to pull the fuel through if there are no other issues.
Mike
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