Wood Glue Suggestions ?

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Hello,
Haven't used wood glues for quite some time, so am not familiar with what is "state of the art' these days.
Doing a small home project with a few pieces of pine. Indoor use. Pieces to be glued are about 6 inches.
Important that they do not come apart. Also, no screws or nail backup.
What's the "best" to use these days ?
I don't like using epoxies for projects like this.
I saw Gorilla Glue heavily advertised.
Is this what to get, or... ?
Pros and cons would be very appreciated for Gorilla Glue, and perhaps some of the others would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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Robert11 wrote:

Not gorilla glue. It is good for some things, but not (despite the ads) the strongest. Go with a yellow wood glue such as Titebond II. You can even use it for outdoor projects.
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Robert Allison
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Robert Allison wrote:

I agree. Gorilla glue is a polyurethane and polyurethanes do not stand up as well as the old wood glue or epoxy.
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And the damn stuff grows and expands so much it either blows out the dowels, or you end up with a lot of gloppy globs you have to trim off. I'm sure it's good for something, just haven't found it yet. Spendy, too.
Steve
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I'll agree that epoxy is not the correct solution to every glue-up situation. In fact, I've never used it for wood.
However, the very "gloppy globs" property that you mentioned is exactly what gives of epoxy (with the correct weight of fillers) some of its allure. It can be poured, molded, shaped and used to fill (even bridge) gaps between dissimilar materials, something you can't do with many other adhesives. It results in a substance that will be rock hard when cured. Use it to lay up fiberglass and you can make an extremely stiff assembly, shaped and sized to fit your application.
Until I worked on a project that required all of the above uses of epoxy, I thought it was nothing more than an extremely strong glue. Once I had the opportunity to see how versatile a product it really was, I found more and more applications where it fit the bill perfectly.
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I'll agree that epoxy is not the correct solution to every glue-up situation. In fact, I've never used it for wood.
However, the very "gloppy globs" property that you mentioned is exactly what gives of epoxy (with the correct weight of fillers) some of its allure. It can be poured, molded, shaped and used to fill (even bridge) gaps between dissimilar materials, something you can't do with many other adhesives. It results in a substance that will be rock hard when cured. Use it to lay up fiberglass and you can make an extremely stiff assembly, shaped and sized to fit your application.
Until I worked on a project that required all of the above uses of epoxy, I thought it was nothing more than an extremely strong glue. Once I had the opportunity to see how versatile a product it really was, I found more and more applications where it fit the bill perfectly.
And I reply:
Yabbut, I think we're talking about two different things. I agree with your statements about epoxy. I would be lost without my JB Weld and JB Fix. However, I find Gorilla Glue about as unpredictable as that shoot in foam stuff regarding unknown amounts of expansion and what it's going to look like dry. Epoxies are pretty much WYSIWYG.
Steve
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My error!
Your post came right after a couple of posts regarding epoxy and I thought you were responding to one of those. Now that I've re-read your comments and applied them to Gorilla glue, I am in full agreement.
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I did find one good use for Gorilla Glue in repairing a tear in the nylon fabric of a hunting boot.
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The only time I used Gorilla glue was at my parent's house - because they had some and I didn't have my epoxy kit.
A contractor had left a hole in their tile wall when he removed a ceramic tile rack. I used the Gorilla glue to secure a piece of wood to the back of the tiles above and below the hole to create a base to mount the mounting bracket for a new towel rack. So far (it's been a year) it's holding fine.
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many epoxies do not SOAK INTO wood,and thus provide a poor bond. Boatbuilding epoxies are much thinner than the usual epoxies you find in stores(including "hobby epoxies"),and need fillers to be used as glue.But they perform much better.
I really recommend downloading System Three's Epoxy Book;it's VERY informative about epoxies. And it's FREE.
West,System Three and RAKA are all excellent boat-building/fiberglassing epoxies.
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Jim Yanik
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Titebond 2. If it's not going to be outside don't waste your money on Titebond 3.
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You may not like it, but slow cure epoxies rule the roost for never fail adhesives. It's not all that painful to mix equal parts of A and Band and stir. That's why some of the better formulations are sold in boat shops. I've also used Titebond II and III and like the II stuff better. There is an equivalent Elmers out there that seems as good as Titebond, check it out. But if your project is mission critical (love those buzz words!) by all means use an epoxy.
Joe
Joe
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Yeah, there was a glue comparison in a woodworking magazine recently and it concluded that yellow Elmers was pretty damn good.
Mike
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West Systems epoxies and fillers are pretty d*mn good. Available at most marine stores.
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wrote:

West System is NOT "equal parts of A and B",they have mix ratios from 2:1 to 5:1.
System Three and RAKA are both 2:1 ratios(epoxy:hardener)
Be sure to read the instructinos for the brand of epoxy you use.
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Jim Yanik
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Never meant to imply that West Systems uses a 1:1 ratio.
I was responding to "That's why some of the better formulations are sold in boat shops." West Systems is, in my opinion, one of the better formulations.
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JIm, You are correct regarding epoxy-hardener ratios in the common commercial systems. However, in my work I use the unmodified industrial resins and hardeners, and the ratios are indeed 1 to 1 for chosen systems. A favorite resin is Epon 826 with Versamid 140 hardener. Much slower cure time than the commercial systems, but outstanding properties. Downside for some would be the higher price, but in typical wood working projects it isn't a factor IMO. One of these days I plan to try out some of the commercial guys stuff and see how it compares to my home brew.
Joe
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wrote:

industrial epoxies may not come in small enough quantities for most home users. Even Raka only comes in a 1.5 qt kit.
I've had good success using System Three(S3) and RAKA epoxies. S3 and West are available in many local woodworking and boating stores. and you can get fast and slow hardeners for them,depending on the temps in your workplace. you can also buy glass cloth at the boat stores.
the S3 trial kit was a great deal,came with lots of different fillers to experiment with.RAKA was less expensive than the S3 or West System epoxies,but I had to mail-order it(Florida). I've played quite a bit with fiberglassing and gluing large model rocket body tubes and fins.
Curing at higher than room temp is also a good idea,if you can work it out.It makes for better strength and a faster cure. I use incandescent lamps or my car's trunk in the hot sun. ;-)
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Jim Yanik
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re: Curing at higher than room temp is also a good idea...I use incandescent lamps or my car's trunk in the hot sun
For large objects, I've used a black trailer, in the sun, with an electric heater. (the heater may have been overkill <g>)
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Any of the yellow wood glues will hold stronger than the wood itself. Titebond, Borden's, whatever brand your store has will work. Spending more money won't get you a better glue joint.
Be sure you have a good mating surface and clamp the pieces until the glue dries.
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