Household glue

I'm building a tool "kit" for a new home renter (bunch of kids who just graduated from college and now have their first house rental).
One of the toolboxes in the house-warming kit is the 'glue box'.
The goal is to have one (and only one) kind of the most used glues. * PVA wood glue (for non-flexing porous surface repairs) * Styrene-butadiene rubber ("Shoe Goo" flexible leather cloth repair) * Polyepoxides, (2-part epoxy for strength in things like porcelain) * Ethyl cyanoacrylate (non-flexing plastics repairs, must be small tubes) * Latex rubber cement (for flexing plastic repairs)
The goal is to handle many types of common situations.
What other types of glues do you stock in your glue kit? And what use is it best for?
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On Tue, 25 Sep 2018 03:55:29 +0100, Logan MacEwens

I would never give a bunch of kids renting my house a box of glue. If they have a problem I would send my handyman over or fix it myself. Turning idiots loose with tools and particularly a box of glue is just asking for trouble.
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On 9/24/2018 10:55 PM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

As a homeowner for 54 years, I've never kept glue around. Most times it dries up before a second use so I get it as needed. I don't recall the last time I actually used an adhesive.
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That is why I like Epoxy. It doesn't really start curing until you mix it and it sticks to lots of stuff. I keep a 3 or 4 types around. Sometimes I will use a liquid style and a modeling clay type in the same joint. Use the liquid to wet the surfaces and the clay to fill the voids. You end up with something really tough. The other thing I figured out is if you are trying to save a caulking gun tube of RTV (silicone), use a long nail like you use on "K" gutter (6-7" long) to plug the spout. Even if the tube starts curing on you, the nail will still be back in the wet stuff so you can get some of it out. I have a box of ring shank ones I got on a closeout somewhere that work very well. I am under whelmed by poly urethane glues like Gorilla glue. Regular old yellow waterproof wood glue works better at a fraction of the cost. Super glue is always a one shot deal so buy those 6 packs with a few drops in each tube in the drop bins at Ace, Harbor Fright or Northern for a buck or so.
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2018 23:41:49 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have never found "Super Glue" to be worth the price, and it's usually sold very cheaply. It's just worthless. Nothing stays together. Almost any other glue is better, especially epoxy types.
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On 25/09/2018 @ 04:42:05, snipped-for-privacy@Weiser.com wrote:

Each type has its merits and demerits.
For example, latex rubber cement is great for plastics and paper that can't get wet and which you have to easily clean up the residue on.
Meanwhile, nothing beats PVA for gluing wood, for example, but it takes at least 24 hours to cure and has to be securely clamped together in most cases.
Nothing beats styrene-butadiene for fixing tennis shoes, for example, but again, it has to be clamped tightly for a period of time longer than you feel like holding with your hands.
Nothing beats poly epoxides for sheer hardness and resistance to extremes of temperature, but again, you have to keep them clamped for quite some time to allow curing.
Are there any other common types we use in our households?
One critical advantage of the ethyl cyanoacrylates that you seem to dislike is that they bond relatively quickly, in the span of time that you can hold two irregularly shaped parts together.
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2018 22:42:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@Weiser.com wrote:

We were using "super glue" before it hit the mass market (Eastman 910) You need proper surface prep, they actually recommend a primer, and this has pretty much zero "filling" capability. You need 2 surfaces that come together with a very tight fit. Then it works very well.
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On 09/24/2018 10:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We kept the Eastman in the refrigerator next to everyone's lunch. I glued my wife's finger to her thumb. It was easier when nobody knew what it was.
The thicker types work pretty well for small gaps, or filling the joint with baking soda can work.
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On Tue, 25 Sep 2018 00:29:29 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

I have seen it but I wrote it off as an inappropriate use of an otherwise good product.
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On 09/24/2018 09:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@Weiser.com wrote:

Different horses...
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On Mon 24 Sep 2018 08:42:05p, told us...

I totally disagree and I've used it many times on various materials. I have items that were repaired with "super glue" well over 20 years ago and they're still intact.
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On 09/25/2018 01:30 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

People use it on inappropriate materials and poorly prepared joints and then say it's worthless. A lot of things in life are like that.
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Exactly. I don't use much glue, but when I do, it works.
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On 09/24/2018 09:11 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I haven't used an adhesive in the last hour... Contact cement for a little boot repair. Couple of days ago it was superglue and hot melt glue to put the nock and ferrule back into a carbon arrow. Then there was the double sided foam tape to reattach a trim piece on the pickup. And the carpenters glue. And the Gorilla glue, the foaming type not the wood glue. Shoe Goo for odd jobs including shoes, JB Weld both the 5 minute for fast, low strength projects and the regular.
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On 25/09/2018 @ 06:08:52, rbowman wrote:

You named useful glues so let's gather some information about them. * contact cement = we may have covered this as latex rubber cement * super glue = we covered this as ethyl cyano acrylate * hot melt glue * carpenter's glue = we covered this as poly vinyl alcohol * gorilla glue (foamy) * sho goo = we covered this as styrene-butadiene rubber * jb weld = we covered this as poly epoxide 2-part epoxies
The two new glues were: * gorilla glue (foamy) * hot melt glue
Gorilla is a meaningless brand name, so we have only the "foamy" to go on.
The "wood" glue is apparently polyvinyl acetate polymer which we covered. http://archpdfs.lps.org/Chemicals/Gorilla-Wood-Glue.pdf
The "foamy" stuff might be polyurethane, which I think is new to the list. http://targetsupply.com/pdf/msds/Gorilla_Glue_MSDS.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gorilla_Glue
The "hot melt" stuff is apparently a "thermoplastic" adhesive. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot-melt_adhesive
Unfortunately there are a acore of different types where each may be very different in its properties (which is all that really matters). * Ethylene-vinyl acetate * Ethylene-acrylate * Polyolefins * Polybutene * Amorphous polyolefin * Polyamides * Polyesters * Polyurethanes * Styrene-butadiene-styrene * Styrene-isoprene-styrene * Styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene * Styrene-ethylene/propylene (SEP) * Polycaprolactone * Polycarbonates * Fluoropolymers * Silicone rubbers * Polypyrrole
Given this new helpful information, I'll add these two to the list of common household glues. * polyurethane glue (foamy?) * generic hot-melt glue (sticks)
Thanks! That's exactly the kind of good information I was seeking.
I don't use either of those two types. What types of things do those two glues repair best?
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On 9/25/2018 11:05 AM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

I find it annoying when someone like the Gorilla glue people use their brand on a different polymer. I just found a similar thing with the pesticide Sevin which was carbaryl but not on all their products today. The quart container I used to buy kills hundred of different insects but is not recommended for the one bothering me.
As others point out some glues are good for most things but none are good for everything and often specialized glues are needed.
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On 9/25/2018 9:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

I've seen the same test several places with the Gorilla polyurethane always the weakest with highest percentage of joint failure; order of the others generally had one of the newer yellow or the Weldwood T II or T III ahead of the white but not sufficiently as to make much real, practical difference.
What is significant in choice is whether the application needs more water resistance or not.
I will not use the polyurethane (one-part) at all, ever, for woodworking purposes; it's just too much mess to deal with.
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On 09/25/2018 09:05 AM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_cement
"Because rubber cements are designed to peel easily or rub off without damaging the paper or leaving any trace of adhesive behind, they are ideal for use in paste-up work where excess cement might need to be removed."
I will be very disappointed if the Weldwood contact cement I'm using to repair the scree cuffs on my boots peels easily. The chemistry is similar but the usage is quite different.
I have two species of Gorillas on the shelf: PVA wood glue, and the foaming (polyurethane) white glue. The wood glue specifically says on the label that it doesn't foam.
PU glues need to be used correctly. Yes, they foam and no, they aren't made to fill that 1/8" gap. Used sparingly and tightly clamped the foaming will help to ensure you don't have a glue starved joint. They are arguably a little better on end grain joints than PVA. For a properly glued long grain joint either PVA or PU will usually tear the wood apart so the 'strength' of the glue itself is moot.
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On 09/25/2018 09:05 AM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

There is another acrylate that I have in various flavors -- methacrylate. I know you don't like brand names but it is commonly referred to as Loctite. Of course Loctite has a wide range of products other than threadlockers just to confuse the issue.
Probably not something kids renting an apartment would need unless they get sick of the setscrew on a old doorknob backing out.
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On 9/25/2018 10:34 PM, rbowman wrote:

Cyanoacrylates differ from methacrylates as the methyl group is replaced by a cyano group.
There are methacrylate adhesives but require a second part with catalyst. Cyanoacrylate cure is initiated by moisture.
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