Household glue



You have to be joking. All this glue will be sniffed before it dries out.
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Thanks for this improved list, with brand name examples!
10 most common household "adhesives" * poly vinyl alcohol ("Elmers", white, yellow, for rigid wood, cardboard) * styrene butadiene rubber ("Shoe Goo", flexible leather cloth repair) * poly epoxide ("JB-Weld, 2-part, for porcelain) * ethyl cyano acrylate ("Krazy", fast repairs, tight fit) * latex rubber cement ("brand?", paper that can't get wet, easily removed) * thermoplastic ("brand?", hot-melt glue) * polyurethane ("Gorilla", foamy, water cured) * pvc cement ("Oatey", 2 part, primer + solvent)
How does the list look? (Did I include everyone's suggestions?)
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On 9/26/2018 7:21 AM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

I just thought of the old Duco cement which is nitro cellulose.
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On 26/09/2018 @ 13:19:54, Frank wrote:

Thanks for that idea. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duco
Is this the stuff? (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Certainly it's nitro cellulose, which is different than what we've covered http://www.itwconsumer.com/devcon-products/product.cfm?id=DUCO%C2%AE%20Cement%2C%201%20fl%2E%20oz%2E%20bottle-53
Any idea what this "nitro cellulose" adhesive is particularly good for? The advertising seems similar to most glues. Bonds: Wood, China, Leather, Glass, Paper, Ceramic, Metal
Although I didn't check it against tensile strength claims of the others * 200 psi (glass to glass) * 700 psi (metal to metal) * 1200 psi (wood to wood)
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On 09/26/2018 06:53 AM, Logan MacEwens wrote:

People like the smell... I'm not being facetious; it's what people always used and it still works as well as it ever did. For instance when making arrows (cedar shafts) it was often used for the nocks and fletching. Personally, I use CA for the nocks and double sided tape for the fletches. Both are fast. It takes a little practice to deal with the very narrow tape but with tape once the feather is in place you can move on rather than letting the glue dry in the jig.
I had a tube I was using for some joints on a model longboat but I managed to stab the tube with an x-acto knife and it was leaking. I probably won't replace it. It was good for gluing printed trim to the hull without harming the ink on the paper.
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On 26/09/2018 @ 15:04:19, rbowman wrote:

Thanks for the insight into the "Duco" brand nitro cellulose adhesives.
I just realized, looking in my own glue toolbox, that I have assorted room-temperature vulcanizing "silicone sealants", mostly used for weatherstripping, where, I'm not sure if that qualifies as an "adhesive" or not.
Someone mentioned "loctite" brand threadlockers, which seem to be vacuum-cured methacrylate.
I guess there are also uv-cured glass-repair products such as this https://www.masterbond.com/tds/uv25
The uv-cured adhesives seem to be expensive though https://www.ellsworth.com/products/adhesives/uv-curing/
Would you include RTV in a common home kit? (the recipients do have cars but don't work in them AFAIK).
What about that uv-cured stuff? Have any of you used it in the home?
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Aliens tacky glue. Like elmers or wood glue but has some flex for things needing some bending.
Shoe Glue in the form of Marine Goop, UV protectors. Outside and inside repairs. Very tough and strong, can glue PVC pipe.
Silicone rtv, flexible, stick to most things that are clean.
Polyurethane, tough, sticks to cement.
Greg
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