Wire nuts versus

I've lived in Europe where wire nuts are prohibited, and always thought a s crew terminal, chocolate block, etc., was probably more secure.
Today I experimented, wiring a new light in my shed and using Alumiconns in
stead of wire nuts.
Well, they work. They're very secure. they cost $3.50 each instead of 9 c ents. They don't save any space in the box; actually they take more, becau se they have to be oriented to not interfere. And while on the bench they look dead easy to install, up on a ladder inside a ceiling box it was a dif ferent story. I had a heck of a time getting everything lined up just righ t with stiff solid wire that had to be stripped to precisely 5/16 inch. It took at least 5 times as long as to wire nut them, maybe more. Of course you'd get faster with practice. But I don't think anyone could afford to l ose that much time in a production setting.
I vaguely remembered the box was missing a cover. So of course the one I b ought didn't fit.
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wrote:

Properly made up, wire nuts are as good as anything out there. Like most things poor workmanship is the enemy of reliability.
Was this aluminum wire? That is usually why you use Alumicons.
A lot of people seem to like Wagos but it is basically the same as a back stabber.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

The Wagos push ins are ok for things like lights that do not draw much current.
There are Walnuts or often called leaver nuts that I like better.
Where I worked we used thousands of wire nuts. If they are installed correctly they work fine.
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On Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:35:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us to digest...

as long as to wire nut them, maybe more. Of course you'd get faster with practice. But I don't think anyone could afford to lose that much time in a production setting.

Even the lever nuts? I asked Wago 20 years ago for a few samples I wanted to try. I unded up with two bags of 100 each! They are great with people for carpel tunnel syndrome - no twisting your wrist - worked for my tests. Ideal has something like the stabber ones but I don't think they ever caught on around here, like the Wagos. If I can find them I will donate them to the vo-tech school near me.
--
Tekkie

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There are several kinds of Wagos. One is the lever nut type.
Another is the Wal-nut. That is just a push in similar to the back stab recepticals. I would only use those on some lighting fixtuers and to replace ballasts in the old flourescent tubes.
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On Thu, 9 Jul 2020 17:25:46 -0400, Ralph Mowery

The code has required a quick disconnect on ballasts for several cycles to avoid splicing wires.
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On 7/6/20 5:46 PM, TimR wrote:

I repair center pivot irrigation systems. Regular yellow wire nuts have been used to wire the motors since day one. They work fine if the basic rule of open end down is followed. Day one is back in the later 1970s when they began to be popular in Nebraska.
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On Tue, 7 Jul 2020 05:21:57 -0500, Dean Hoffman

I have had yellow wire nuts on the Nav lights on my salt water boat for over 30 years. It was originally just a temporary thing. When they fail I will do something better. Note, I do have the splices in a 3R box.
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On Monday, July 6, 2020 at 5:46:40 PM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

screw terminal, chocolate block, etc., was probably more secure.

instead of wire nuts.

cents. They don't save any space in the box; actually they take more, bec ause they have to be oriented to not interfere. And while on the bench the y look dead easy to install, up on a ladder inside a ceiling box it was a d ifferent story. I had a heck of a time getting everything lined up just ri ght with stiff solid wire that had to be stripped to precisely 5/16 inch. It took at least 5 times as long as to wire nut them, maybe more. Of cours e you'd get faster with practice. But I don't think anyone could afford to lose that much time in a production setting.

bought didn't fit.
This is my preference.
I prefer to solder all my wires and then use shrink tubing.
It makes for a very strong joint.
Andy
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On 7/6/20 6:46 PM, TimR wrote:

Refrigeration equipment using R290 (propane) can't use wire nuts splices.  Wago lever lock splices are the preferred choice.
https://www.continentalrefrigerator.com/pdf/SM-R290.pdf   (scroll to page 17)

https://youtu.be/RL77WBL32dY?tf

https://youtu.be/RL77WBL32dY?tf

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Factory job within a hermetically sealed unit, yes.
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On Wednesday, July 8, 2020 at 6:49:54 AM UTC-4, Sparky wrote:

a screw terminal, chocolate block, etc., was probably more secure.

s instead of wire nuts.

9 cents. They don't save any space in the box; actually they take more, b ecause they have to be oriented to not interfere. And while on the bench t hey look dead easy to install, up on a ladder inside a ceiling box it was a different story. I had a heck of a time getting everything lined up just right with stiff solid wire that had to be stripped to precisely 5/16 inch. It took at least 5 times as long as to wire nut them, maybe more. Of cou rse you'd get faster with practice. But I don't think anyone could afford to lose that much time in a production setting.

I bought didn't fit.

  Wago lever lock splices are the preferred choice.

page 17)

That must be an extremely small occurrence, unless I'm missing something. Propane in refrigeration eqpt? That must have ended a long time ago, no?
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https://bensdiscountsupply.com/propane-refrigerator/
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On 7/8/2020 9:39 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Yah, we'll see if it makes a comeback.  It would be a near perfect refrigerant if it wasn't so explosive.
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On Wednesday, July 8, 2020 at 6:49:54 AM UTC-4, Sparky wrote:

  Wago lever lock splices are the preferred choice.

page 17)

I hadn't seen those before. where do you get them?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Amazon has them for less than $ 15 for 50 of them. You can get them at any better electrical store.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) &sprefix=wago+l%2Caps%2C161&ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_6
You can get them that will connect several numbers of wire.
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On 7/6/20 5:46 PM, TimR wrote:

If you are using aluminum wiring, it's a horrible idea. It was banned in the US due to starting fires.
Since all wiring is copper here in the US...a properly installed wire nut is just fine.
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On Wednesday, July 8, 2020 at 11:54:26 AM UTC-4, philo wrote:

I agree.
I guess the reservation I have is over "properly installed." Give an amate ur DIYer 3 pieces of soft stranded 14 ga on a table with good light, the ri ght size wire nut, and a beer, and that will probably happen. Put him on a ladder in a crowded junction box with solid 12 in 95 F heat, using a headl amp cause it's dark after you kill the power, like I was this week, and may be the odds go down.
What I wonder is if some of the other systems are inherently easier to do r ight, or at least tell if you didn't. That lever lock looks pretty good. I also suspect any system that requires twisting the wires leaves room for one to slip loose.
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Actually, _properly wired_, Al wiring is just as safe as Cu.
The main issue is related to the fact that thermal expansion is greater in Al when compared with Cu, so if connections aren't properly done, the thermal expansion of the conductor will cause the connection point to loosen, which increases the resistance, which generates more heat, which can, in some cases, lead to fire.
There are additional issues related to interconnecting Al and Cu conductors causing corrosion (hence higher resistance) due to chemical reactions between the dissimilar metals (hence the invention of the bimetalic split bolt for larger AWGsn and Alumiconn et alia connectors for smaller AWG and anti-oxidant grease for bi-metal splices).
Given that unqualified homeowners often try to do their own wiring and don't have the knowledge to choose the correct device for the application (e.g. AL-rated receptacles) or to torque the connections properly, it seemed safer to just ban AL for standard residential applications (and copper prices had fallen, the rise in which had led to the use of Al in the first place).

That's incorrect. My former neighborhood in california is all Al (as were many subdivisions and individual homes built in the late 60's through the mid 70's in the United States).
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On 7/8/2020 10:54 AM, philo wrote: ...

2017 Code Language:
110.5 Conductors. Conductors normally used to carry current shall be of copper or aluminum unless otherwise provided in this Code. Where the conductor material is not specified, the sizes given in this Code shall apply to copper conductors. Where other materials are used, the size shall be changed accordingly.
Informational Note: For copper-clad aluminum conductors, see 310.15.
AA-8000 Al alloy has been approved by NEC since 1987.
W/ Cu prices having remained relatively low and (mostly) stable, Al for branch circuits isn't all that common, but it is within NEC to use. Whether local jurisdictions have caught up and reverted or not is another question.
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