which is more economical, electric baseboard heating with a thermostat and one that will run continuously on a low setting


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We have a cottage with baseboard heating with thermostats upstairs and baseboard heating downstairs that runs continuously. Normally in the winter we leave the baseboard heating upstairs set at 50 degrees. This year our handyman blew out the pipes and we are leaving the cottage without heat at all except for the part of the basement with the water softener. That baseboard heater runs steady, there is no thermostatic control. Our handyman told us that it is cheaper to go with the baseboard heater without the thermostat set on low. It keeps the room warmer than I thought was necessary. Is he right?
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On Thursday, December 14, 2017 at 2:14:09 PM UTC-5, Sue wrote:

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He's nuts. The more it's on, the more heat it puts out, the more you pay. Twice the heat, twice the cost. Unless you live somewhere where there are tiered rates, in which case if you use twice as much you would pay more th an twice as much if you go to the higher tiered rate. I'd have a thermosta t set to a low temp to prevent freezing.
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On 12/14/2017 2:14 PM, Sue wrote:

No, he's an idiot. To raise the temperature of a room you need a given about of energy, no matter the source or the fuel. In your case, you can have the heat set on low, say 1000 watts for 24 hours and the cost is the same as 2000 watts for 12 hours cycling with a thermostat, or 4000 watts for 6 hours.
On a warm day, if no heat is needed the T-stat will turn it off, his setup will keep it going even if slow. Think of it as filling a gallon jug with water. Turn the faucet on fast it will fill fast, turn it on slow, it will take longer. In either case, the result is a gallon of water.
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replying to Sue, Iggy wrote: He's very wrong to have it run regardless. But, he's very right to always maintain the same temperature...this is true with any heating system. However, the only way to make maintaining a set temperature work efficiently is to have a thermostat that tells the unit to kick on only as needed.
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On 12/14/2017 1:14 PM, Sue wrote:

I agree with the others HOWEVER>>>>
Check to see what he really means.
For example, in my wife's studio there is a 220v baseboard heater that simply has a knob that can be set continuously high through low. When she is not in there she keeps it set to low. It's not a calibrated thermostat but it will turn off if the temp. goes over it's set point.
If that's what he's referring to it's OK.
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On Thursday, December 14, 2017 at 4:26:30 PM UTC-5, philo wrote:

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Maybe, except for the part where she says whatever it is that's without a thermostat (or precise temp control, per your point), it keeps the house warmer than they think is necessary. Anytime you're running electric heat and keeping it warmer than necessary, it can run up some big bills fast. But I agree, we don't know at lot here and it's not explained well. Does she mean the choices are leaving the thermostat upstairs on 50F or leaving the heater in just a small utility room running on low, like you say? If that's the case, i agree, it could very well be less expensive to keep a small room well above freezing, instead of the whole place at 50F. Best would be to put a small electric heater, even a plug-in one in the room that can be set to ~40F. If you spent $35 on one of those it could be less than running electric to keep that room at 60F all winter, that's for sure. Plus think of the carbon and the whales saved.
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It's still a thermostat-- - - - - - - - - -- -- -
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I bet if you look in there High to Low is actually a thermostat but it is only looking at the heat right there. If it gets warm enough, that will turn off. I had 2 of those wall pack toaster wire heaters here for years.
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Sue posted for all of us...

If you were as smart as you think you are you would know the answer.
--
Tekkie

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On 12/14/17 1:14 PM, Sue wrote:

Farmers use electric tank heaters for their livestock drinking tanks. Would such a thing work for a water softener? That might be cheaper if so.
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On Thursday, December 14, 2017 at 9:37:16 PM UTC-5, Dean Hoffman wrote:

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Or just drain it like everything else. IDK if there are issues with draini ng a water softener compared to any other tank, but if not, drain it. It also solves the problem of what happens with a cabin if it loses power in a winter storm.
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yep just drain everything for the winter.....
then plan to add a better heating system for the future.....
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On Thu, 14 Dec 2017 18:54:52 -0800 (PST), trader_4

There is no easy way to drain the resin tank and if it really gets cold the brine tank could freeze too.
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On 12/15/2017 02:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Your correct, it's a pain in the ass butt it's possible.
http://products.geappliances.com/appliance/gea-support-search-content?contentId !061
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