Some things I learned this week

  It's a lot easier to stand a 16 foot 4x4 up in the hole than it is to stand it up and then drop it in the hole . I have bruises to prove that . Slide a board into the hole for the butt end of the timber to slide down so you don't drag a lot of dirt (mud , rocks , etc) back down into the hole you dug .
  Make sure the bottom 3-4 feet of the posts is plumb . Most timbers that length are not straight anyway . You can pull the tops into alignment as you frame the roof .
  After a rainstorm your holes will be filled with water and muck . (I already knew this , just had it reinforced.)
  The 1x4's you bought for use on the roof make dandy bracing while the concrete sets - and while you're leaning a ladder against one of those timbers to cut a ledge to set your framing members on .
  No matter how much progress you make in a day , your wife thinks this is taking too long .
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
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wrote:

You should have asked ;-) I have done this a lot with 16' 6" PT poles. It does help to screw a 2x4x 2' "handle" on them so you can lift and position them once they are in the hole. I dig the hole a little too deep and then adjust the pole up a little throwing gravel in the bottom of the hole. Pick it up and drop it a few times to compact it for the final height. Since rain is a regular thing here, I try to set the pole right after digging the hole instead of digging all the holes first. If you do the corners first, you can set a string line for the rest and it is easier to get the holes and height right. That also lets you do this over more than one day. I do like post and beam construction and I have a couple of things built that way. They laugh at hurricanes.
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