Question about breaking the bead using a harbor freight bead breaker?

On Tue, 20 Dec 2016 19:33:06 +0000 (UTC), Frank Baron

WTF? You were complaining about shops "not doing the job right" and let her leave with over-inflated tires? Shame on you.
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On Tue, 20 Dec 2016 21:34:36 -0600, Vic Smith

Just KNEW he'd screw SOMETHING up. It was "in the stars".
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On Tue, 20 Dec 2016 23:18:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca advised:

I agree there is irony in me forgetting to drop the pressure down from 45 to something like 35. The door placard says 29.
I called her and asked if the ride felt different and she said she didn't notice.
What do you think the danger zone is for tires anyway? I read 65psi (so 45 is well below that, but of course, tires heat up in use).
Where do you think the danger psi is?
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On Wednesday, December 21, 2016 at 11:10:39 AM UTC-5, Frank Baron wrote:

I'm left wondering why you over inflated the tires to begin with.
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On Wed, 21 Dec 2016 08:20:28 -0800 (PST), trader_4 advised:

That's a good question. Remember, I'm not an expert (and I never claimed to be one).
Also remember that I am asking for advice, so, I will tell you what I did, whereas someone else will make believe they did everything perfectly (which is how all DIYs are written, from a 20/20 hindsight perspective).
The reason I inflated them to 45 was that I had to inflate them to about 60 PSI to ensure the bead was set, and then I dropped the inflation down and checked the bead with soap and water for bubbles indicating a leak.
As a *further* leak indicator, I set them all to 45psi to see if they leaked. Since I wasn't going to have the tires for a long time, I was planning on checking the pressure after a few hours while I had the vehicle overnight.
My plan was to drop the pressure to 35 when the owner came back for the vehicle. The owner came back early to pick up the vehicle, so, I just plain forgot to do that in the fuss, so, I never checked if they were leaking down from the 45psi.
In the meantime, I did five more tires, as an experiment and for practice, where I patched each one of them with a home-made plug-patch.
Here's the inside look at the plug:
http://i.cubeupload.com/EJF4y3.jpg
And here's the inside look at the patch over that plug:
http://i.cubeupload.com/OmMamJ.jpg
Of the five experiments, one tire still won't go on the rim, even though we had a matched set of tires and rims, which went on just fine!
http://i.cubeupload.com/nJNap0.jpg
For the life of us, we can't figure out *how* to get this last tire on the rim, even though its sister tire and rim went on just fine. (We even bent the tire iron tip, using all the force that we did.)
http://i.cubeupload.com/OoAABt.jpg
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 23:45:12 +0000 (UTC), Frank Baron advised:

I finally broke down and bought the HF Pittsburgh Bead Breaker, Harbor Freight item 92961. (
http://i.cubeupload.com/Lb3Fof.jpg )
I used that harbor freight bead breaker to break the beads on four difficult steel-rim wheels with Optimo P235/75R15 108T thick-sidewall tires seemingly glued on.
http://cubeupload.com/im/uFwoAk.jpg
After using it successfully (not without a few curses), I conclude the HF standalone bead breaker sucks but it sucks differently than the bead breaker attachment on the Harbor Freight tire changing tool.
http://i.cubeupload.com/rQiNkr.jpg
The HF tire changing tool bead breaker is fine for the three passenger tires I've done now, but it's far too weak (puny would be more apropos) for the strong sidewall SUV tires.
http://i.cubeupload.com/sjfJWR.jpg
Luckily (as Clare kindly warned me), all of what sucks in both tools can be "fixed" if you know ahead of time what to modify (as Clare has kindly shown us):
http://i.cubeupload.com/GqExGq.jpg
What sucks about the tire-changing tool bead-breaker attachment is: a. The bead-breaker arms are too weak (and bend like a pretzel) b. The clevis pins (thanks Clare) are far too sloppy (replace with bolts) c. The bead breaker arc is far too small (about 1/2 to 1/4 of what you need d. The tire iron twists out of your hands (use a vise grip to prevent that) e. The tire iron is too soft so it bends when used as a lever (use pipe) f. The base *must* be bolted down for SUV tires which require turning force HF Pittsburgh Bead Breaker, Harbor Freight item #92961 http://www.harborfreight.com/bead-breaker-92961.html
What sucks about the standalone bead breaker tool is: a. The base is far too short for big tires b. The base has no attachment holes for securing to concrete or pallets c. The lever action isn't all that powerful (but it's strong enough) HF Pittsburgh Manual Tire Changer, Harbor Freight item #62317 http://www.harborfreight.com/automotive-motorcycle/tire-wheel/manual-tire-changer-62317.html
Here is the first method that I used as an expediency to temporarily "extend" the base of the HF bead breaking tool (it was a steel shelf from a Costco shelf rack):
http://cubeupload.com/im/nADolx.jpg
Here is the second method that I used to extend the base (it's just a board of wood that I had lying around):
http://cubeupload.com/im/uZf7Id.jpg
I changed multiple car tires easily with both tools, but SUV 108T P235/75 tires stressed both tools to the max - where - without the emergency modifications above - I don't think you can do the job (I couldn't).
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