OT: End of Daylight Stupid Time this Sunday

James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
"There is absolutely no reason to have more light in the morning. "
Congratulations! Spoken like a true American! Sleep in late, stay up til 2am watching TV.
Are you kidding? If we stayed on Standard year round, and May-July sunrises were at 5am or sooner, I'd be up doing chores around the house. 6am sun is high enough to melt the dew off the lawn for mowing.
When the clock says 12:00, it actually corresponds approximately to actual SOLAR noon, not 11am.
By the time I get home from work, the hottest part of the day is over, so my AC doesn't have to work as hard, and it's still light out til 7-8pm standard.
"-- The problem with today's society is adults are treated like children, children are treated like retards, and retards are exempt from the law. "
This contradicts your earlier statement about "no need" for early sunlight - apparently you don't mind the guvermint telling you what time your clocks should read.
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Please summarise that more briefly, I have no idea what you're on about.
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James Wilkinson Sword wrote: "> Congratulations! Spoken like a true American!

"Please summarise that more briefly, I have no idea what you're on about. "
What don't you understand. The length of daylight changes throughout the year. Between April and September sunrise and set are, respectively, before and after the 'sixes'. Between October and March, after six am and before six pm, respectively.
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What point are you making? If it's something to do with the midpoint of the day, it's best to shift that to be more in the evening than the wee hours before 6am.
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James Wilkinson Sword wrote: "What point are you making? If it's something to do with the midpoint of the day, it's best to shift that to be more in the evening than the wee hours before 6am. "
For what purpose? The wee hours are the best hours of the day!
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Ok if you have fuck all to do. Most people find themselves carrying on with whatever they're doing and being late 24 hours a day.
--
I do not think it is necessary to believe that the same god who has given us our senses, reason, and intelligence wished us to abandon their use, giving us by some other means the information that we could gain through them -- Galileo Galilei

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My sig has nothing to do with time.
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Black holes are where god divided by zero.

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On 11/05/2016 02:53 PM, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
[snip]

You have no control over how much light there is (unless you move somewhere else).
If there is too much light IN THE MORNING, then you need to rearrange your schedule so your sleep period is earlier.
That's exactly the same as playing this mind game of DST, except it's less complicated.
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2016 18:40:28 -0000, "James Wilkinson Sword"

From: http://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst/history.html
History of Daylight Saving Time - DST
Daylight Saving Time (DST) is used to save energy and make better use of daylight. It was first used in 1908 in Thunder Bay, Canada. Business watch and one hundred dollar bill
Benjamin Franklin suggested, rather jokingly, to wake up earlier to save candles.
DST normally adds 1 hour to standard time with the purpose of making better use of daylight and conserving energy. This means that the sunrise and sunset are one hour later, on the clock, than the day before.
First Used in Canada in 1908
In July, 1908, Thunder Bay in Ontario, Canada became the first location to use DST. Other locations in Canada were also early to introduce Daylight Saving bylaws.
On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan, Canada implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba followed on April 24, 1916. According to the April 3, 1916, edition of the Manitoba Free Press, Daylight Saving Time in Regina “proved so popular that bylaw now brings it into effect automatically”. DST Statistics — Past and Present Use
Germany First Country to Use DST
Germany became the first country to introduce DST when clocks were turned ahead 1 hour on April 30, 1916. The rationale was to minimize the use of artificial lighting in order to save fuel for the war effort during World War I.
The idea was quickly followed by the United Kingdom and many other countries, including France. Many countries reverted back to standard time after World War I, and it wasn’t until the next World War that DST made its return in most of Europe. Ancient Civilizations Although DST has only been used for about 100 years, the idea was conceived many years before. Ancient civilizations are known to have engaged in a practice similar to modern DST where they would adjust their daily schedules to the Sun's schedule. For example, the Roman water clocks used different scales for different months of the year. Benjamin Franklin
American inventor and politician Benjamin Franklin wrote an essay called “An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light” to the editor of The Journal of Paris in 1784. In the essay, he suggested, although jokingly, that Parisians could economize candle usage by getting people out of bed earlier in the morning, making use of the natural morning light instead.
Hudson and Willett
In 1895, New Zealand scientist George Vernon Hudson presented a paper to the Wellington Philosophical Society, proposing a two-hour shift forward in October and a two-hour shift back in March. There was interest in the idea, but it was never followed through.
In 1905, independently from Hudson, British builder William Willett suggested setting the clocks ahead 20 minutes on each of the four Sundays in April, and switching them back by the same amount on each of the four Sundays in September, a total of eight time switches per year. First Daylight Saving Bill
Willett’s Daylight Saving plan caught the attention of Member of Parliament, Robert Pearce, who introduced a bill to the House of Commons in February 1908. The first Daylight Saving Bill was drafted in 1909, presented to Parliament several times and examined by a select committee. However, the idea was opposed by many, especially farmers, so the bill was never made into a law. Willett died in 1915, the year before the United Kingdom started using DST in May 1916. DST in the United States
In the US, “Fast Time” as it was called then, was first introduced in 1918 when President Woodrow Wilson signed it into law to support the war effort during World War I. The initiative was sparked by Robert Garland, a Pittsburgh industrialist who had encountered the idea in the UK. Today he is often called the “Father of Daylight Saving”.
Only seven months, later the seasonal time change was repealed. However, some cities, including Pittsburgh, Boston, and New York, continued to use it until President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted year-round DST in the United States in 1942. War Time DST
Year-round DST, also called “War Time”, was in force during World War II, from February 9, 1942, to September 30, 1945, in the US and Canada. During this time, the US time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Mountain War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”. After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Peace Time”.
The UK applied “Double Summer Time” during World War II by setting the clocks two hours ahead of GMT during the summer and one hour ahead of GMT during the winter. DST History in Europe US Uniform Time Act of 1966
From 1945 to 1966 there were no uniform rules for DST in the US and it caused widespread confusion especially for trains, buses, and the broadcasting industry. As a result, the Uniform Time Act of 1966 was established by Congress. It stated that DST would begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October. However, states still had the ability to be exempt from DST by passing a state ordinance.
Modern DST History in the US
The US Congress extended DST to a period of ten months in 1974 and eight months in 1975, in hopes to save energy following the 1973 oil embargo. The trial period showed that DST saved the energy equivalent of 10,000 barrels of oil each day, but DST still proved to be controversial. Many complained that the dark winter mornings endangered the lives of children going to school. Daylight Saving or Savings? Energy Policy Act of 2005
After the energy crisis was over in 1976, the DST schedule in the US was revised several times throughout the years. From 1987 to 2006, the country observed DST for about seven months each year. The current schedule was introduced in 2007 and follows the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which extended the period by about one month. Today, DST starts on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November. Daylight Saving Today
Daylight Saving Time is now in use in over 70 countries worldwide and affects over a billion people every year. The beginning and end dates vary from one country to another. In 1996, the European Union (EU) standardized an EU-wide DST schedule, which runs from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October.
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Doesn't make sense. Leave it at the forward setting all year round and save even more power.
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On 11/05/2016 02:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:
[snip]

I've heard that DST started as a joke. That makes sense, considering this nonsense about more daylight.
[snip]
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50 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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On 11/5/2016 2:40 PM, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

I've been in UK in July and days were long which means further north makes winter days short. You might go to work in the dark and come home in the dark.
Then once I was at the farthest west of our eastern time zone and it was strange to see it so dark. If you want to fine tune it, you might change zones for each minute.
Then I noted somewhere major cities time was a half hour out of sync.
Whole thing makes no sense.
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Half hour zones is being far too fussy.
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On 11/05/2016 02:55 PM, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
[snip]

There is such timezones in Iran, Afghanistan, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, Cocos, North Korea, Australia, Canada, Venezuela, and French Polynesia.
There's also a couple of timezones where the DST offset is NOT 1 hour. Lord Howe Island (30 min) Troll Station, Antarctica (2 hours)
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50 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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That's because they're more sensible than the Yanks.
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On 11/20/2016 4:52 PM, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

So we should use Beijing time? We probably will in another 25 years. No, wait, Trump will buy China.
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No you should pick one of your own cities. My god you're dumber than I thought.
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On 11/05/2016 01:40 PM, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

Do people really believe this? You're getting less light because you're doing everything an hour later.
--
50 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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On 11/5/16 3:44 AM, T wrote:

I wish they would quit with this messing with the clocks. My roses need all the sunlight they can get ;-)
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Write your Congress members. Tell them Standard time year round. They'll respond with the usual history of DST spiel.
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