Fix my bumper?

The plastic cowl that covers the front bumper of my 1998 Mercury Grand Marquis is broken underneath and the loose ends are dangling down and will surely get caught on something before long. I'd like to repair it before it gets worse.
What it used to look like:
https://www.carid.com/images/replace/bumpers/fo1000518v.jpg
What it looks like now (taken from below, looking up toward the radiator):
http://i68.tinypic.com/oiu492.jpg
How can I fix this? the broken surfaces need to be strong against pulling-apart forces, so I guess simple glue or tape won't cut it. I was thinking of maybe drilling holes on each side and lacing the breaks together with wire or plastic zip ties. Appearance is unimportant, as this is underneath the car and not normally visible.
Any suggestions?
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alt.home.repair:

This is a better picture - it shows the area below (parallel to the ground) that's broken. The front grill-like area is intact.
https://www.carid.com/images/sherman/test/548-87-1.jpg

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On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:32:13 -0000 (UTC), "Dove Tail"

It broke because some clown hit a parking curb once too often.

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On Sunday, March 18, 2018 at 5:33:26 PM UTC-4, Nil wrote:

I can't tell if a piece is missing or not. If not, I've used crazy glue for same kind of repair. What do you have to lose? If it comes apart again, yo u can try more complicated repair. If missing a piece find a piece of plas tic to bridge it, then crazy glue or fast epoxy.
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alt.home.repair:

No, nothing's missing yet, which is why I'm eager to repair it before it gets worse and pieces start to fall off.
I like your idea or a plastic bridge. It should be something tough like the original material, as I think that area probably gets road debris thrown at it, and it gets scraped by things I might run over.
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On 3/18/18 5:55 PM, Nil wrote:

Drill holes and bridge with a piece of steel or hard plastic with nylon bolts & nuts thru the holes.
Or epoxy a piece of plastic bridging the break from behind, not just the edges of the break.
or both of the above ;-)
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No, I haven't. I've used epoxy a couple of times for filling holes, but not for bonding. Do you think it would hold butted edges of plastic material like this against being pulled apart? Maybe a combination of that plus lacing them together would be good.
The bumpers sold at the site where I got those pictures from describe them as "plastic".
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wrote:

Not without some sort of backing to bridge the broken pieces.
As long as you don't care about appearance. I'd get a piece of stout aluminum - or maybe polycarbonate plastic - and back the two sides with it, attaching with aluminum pop rivets.
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On 3/19/2018 8:38 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I don't know what the plastic is but if it is ABS even PVC glue might work. I would also reinforce the back with glued on fiber glass to get a good joint. If the plastic is polyethylene it will be tough to glue but maybe you can pop rivet with metal backing.
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It will almost certainly be some sort of polyetheline or poly-urethane -there is a product made for repairing the urethane bumpers - a 2 part epoxy-type p[roduct - one I have used is Dynatron #660 dynaweld. Works reasonably well - but NOT cheap at $81 US from Napa.
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On 3/19/2018 10:22 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:

Can't find specific material but here is what one site says:
"The majority of modern plastic car bumper system fascias are made of thermoplastic olefins (TPOs), polycarbonates, polyesters, polypropylene, polyurethanes, polyamides, or blends of these with, for instance, glass fibers, for strength and structural rigidity."
Part is not particularly stressed but glue alone is probably not sufficient. There are also all kinds of 2 part epoxies most likely a lot cheaper. I'd look for a lower modulus one for gluing plastics but chemistry is the same and any should work.
If there is a lose piece of plastic, simple tests like solubility and burning can often identify it.
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On 03/19/2018 01:53 PM, Frank wrote:

That just about covers the thermoplastic field...
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On 03/19/2018 08:22 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:

Polyethylene and polypropylene both have a waxy feel and are very difficult to bond. I've never tried it but supposedly the Loctite product does work.
http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/sg_plstc/overview/Loctite-Plastics-Bonding-System.htm
The usual technique has been plastic welding. 'White' Gorilla Glue, not the woodworking type, is polyurethane and should work. You need to clamp the backing material tightly since the glue foams as it sets.
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On Monday, March 19, 2018 at 5:32:03 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

Clamping, welding, epoxy with fiberglass, drilling, stove bolts, new aluminum pieces, getting a new bumper, going to the salvage yard to get another one, taking the old one off to better repair it, testing to find out what kind of plastic it is, and God knows what. Or he could just use crazy glue, like I did. It worked, It was a 5 min repair. Crazy glue works with every plastic I've seen. And like I said in my first post, what's the downside? If it comes loose again, the wheels aren't falling off, the car isn't going to suddenly stop. Amazing how people can turn a 5 min repair into a cluster fuck.
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:33:18 -0400, Nil wrote:

Drill holes and use a large number of small tie-wraps.
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On 3/18/18 4:33 PM, Nil wrote:

T4's idea of bridging it would probably be best. Maybe use a plastic door sill along with epoxy? Brass or stainless screws? Wander around your local Ace Hardware. You'll get a moment of inspiration when you see something that would work.
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Any reason not to replace it with a non-broken boneyard part?
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alt.home.repair:

Besides that it would presumably cost me a lot more, I don't know where to get the part from, and I don't know how to install it, it's a very good idea.
I actually hadn't thought about it. I'll look into it. I have a Haynes manual - maybe that will give me a better feel for the difficulty.
Still, a little plastic, some epoxy, and some zip ties is bound to be cheap and effective.
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On Sunday, March 18, 2018 at 7:26:54 PM UTC-4, Nil wrote:

Like I said, I'd go with crazy glue first. It worked fine for me. The advantage is that you only have to hold it for a couple mins and it sets up. As long as the surfaces mate back together cleanly, SG is very strong. If it's buggered up, pieces missing, can't align it right, then I'd go with epoxy. If that doesn't hold up, you can always go to the more involved repair.
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If the car is a beater, just do whatever works. You *might* encounter noise issues. Last week my son got a perfect bumper for his wife's '96 caddy at a boneyard for $50, but he's a mechanic, and is familar with doing it. Can't say you're on the wrong path.    
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