All good things must come to an end

Hi All,
All good things come to and end.
According to the weather service, Saturday night will be 29F, then 26, 27, 26. So I harvested everything big and small. well, except the Goji's which adore the cold.
Now to plot out next year's garden!
And I have all winter to pull out all the dead plants. Nothing more pathetic looking than a frozen dead zucchini plant.
Also, it is time to plant my garlic.
-T
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On Friday, September 27, 2019 at 9:10:25 PM UTC-4, T wrote:

Where are you that it's getting that cold already? Our overnight lows here northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's for t he next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no notic eable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next Frida y but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.
Paul
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On 9/28/19 5:42 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat8.88662552625709&lon=-119.73447126141484
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On Saturday, September 28, 2019 at 6:25:13 PM UTC-4, T wrote:

ere northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, are projected to be in the mid-60's f or the next week, then falling to around 50. We've been very dry here, no n oticeable rain for a couple of weeks. They're saying morning showers next F riday but those are frequently scattered around the area; one neighborhood gets wet, the one across the street stays dry.

119.73447126141484
I wouldn't have thought it got so cold so soon up there.
Paul
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On 9/28/19 7:29 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

It is always a fight between summer and winter. We have a really short growing season
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On 9/28/19 9:04 PM, T wrote:

l.

=-119.73447126141484

The weather service said it got down to 28F last night. But nothing froze. We did have winds about 20 mph. I wonder if that had anything to do with it. Tonight is suppose to get worse.
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T wrote: ...

be glad you're not in Montana... eek! that's way too early to get that much snow!
songbird
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On 9/30/19 5:02 AM, songbird wrote:

¡Ay, caramba!
I listened to a documentary oh plans that won't domesticate. one of them was "huckleberry". They REQUIRE high altitude and a blanket of snow over them in the winter. (Cold weather with out the snow cover kills them.) Montana sounds like they will be getting a bumper crop of (wild) huckleberries this years!
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Pavel314 wrote: ...

some of my garden friends up in Idaho have already had snow on the ground this past week.
here we have two days of low 80s in the forecast for Mon-Tue and then returning to cooler, but no frost or freezing in the forecast for at least the next week so far.
as long as it holds like this for a few more weeks that should be good enough.
the early stuff is already in (onions, early beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash). the later beans will go as long as they can or until i can get out to pick them.
way too much rain this week so i may be picking some pods in the rain (today included).
songbird
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On 9/27/19 6:10 PM, T wrote:

Well how about that. The weather service said we had SEVERAL days at sub freezing and the kids did not die. Huh!
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T wrote: ...

everything here needs water wings. more rain still in the forecast until next week when we may get enough days in a row of dry weather to where i can get back out and get a few things done. planting garlic would be a good idea.
being inside for a few days in a row let me get caught up on shelling, sorting and consolidating box tops/flats so i have some space back in my room.
also got some of the worms fed - they look to be doing alright. :)
songbird
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On 10/3/19 5:01 AM, songbird wrote:

I keep wondering if I can buy worms and toss them in all my holes. So far the only thing I can find are fishing worms.
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T wrote: ...

you can, but it would likely be a waste of $.
adult worms generally don't transplant well as they are acclimated to the soil they were raised in.
some fishing worms may do better than others. do not, however, release worms into the wild or wooded areas unless you know for a fact that they are already there. night-crawlers from North America, no, don't buy those as any type of worm for raising or using in a garden as they likely won't make it without special care and they also may not be right for the area anyways.
one worm you may find in a bait store will be called either an european night crawler or a belgian night crawler. these make excellent compost worms but will likely not survive extreme heat or cold so you might raise them in buckets like i do and then put the worm compost outside without too much worry that they will be a problem to any native species. yet, it is a good idea to ask your local environmental type people what they'd think of using them. :)
if you want any tips on raising worms in buckets in the non-conventional way you can check out my webpages for those:
http://www.anthive.com/project/worms/ http://www.anthive.com/project/taters/
the reason i call it non-conventional is that many people do worm composting but they don't use any dirt from the gardens in their system so they are not recharging their garden soil and also they usually aren't using a mix of worms where i usually have at least three to six worm species in the buckets here.
if you can find organic matter out and around that is kept fairly wet/moist there is a good chance it already has a population of compost worms there. you can take a few dozen from various place and that will often work just fine to start with.
as you get deeper garden soil you can then look for gardners around your area who would likely be happy to share some other species of worms with you to use. :)
songbird
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On 10/3/19 12:07 PM, songbird wrote:

Thank you!
The last thing I wanted to do was introduce an invasive species!
I see about two a year in the garden. I presume the better my soil gets, the more of their cousins will comes.
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On 10/2/19 6:31 PM, T wrote:

Last night got them. Very pathetic looking. Time to pull out all the dead plants.
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On 10/4/19 1:32 PM, T wrote:

Well how about that. One of the feral tomatoes hiding under one of the dead egg plants survived and has both fruit and flowers. Plus, now we are having a warming spell, so maybe some more tomatoes?
:-)
-T
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Here, not so much. The cold weather, that is. I don't expect any sure-enough freezing temperatures until Febrary but sometimes they surprise us by showing up in December, which is really hard on the tomatoes and the peas. AFAIK, the kids and their progeny are alive, well and staying warm in various locales throughout the southeastern US, mostly. Lately, days have been topping out at or near 90° while nights get down to middle to low 60's. Typical for the season down here. A bit warm during days and a bit "airish" overnight, especially during the very small hours. Dry. No rain since August. Autumns typically are dry unless a passing tropical storm/hurricane brings more rain than we want, which happens from time to time.... However, we've had one rainy day this week with more predicted. I'm grateful for it even though the rain is interfering with my firewood and weeding activities.     I was unable to garden or do any significant outside maintenance this past year but am determined to rectify that this year. No heat needed since February, or thereabouts. Again, typical for these parts. Had no firewood last winter and was dependent on the local electricity reseller to keep the hovel relatively warm (those are _not_ generous people) but this year we've what appears to be plenty of hardwood on hand and I've decided to abandon the axe and poney up for a powered splitting machine, although, I'm basically a non-believer in such foolishness and am certain to miss the exercise provided by hand-splitting with the axe.     Due to my inattention, the "weeds" (mostly Spanish needles, common ragweed and indigenous grapevine) are head-high, although, I've been able to keep a path to the clothesline cleared and now one can at least _see_ a couple of garden beds. The Spanish needles and ragweed, unless they've been mowed in the past, are easy enough to remove but the grape vine sometimes seems to fight back.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote: ...

:)

can you rent one instead?

yeah, wild grapes can take over here if i don't keep after them at least every other year or so. cutting the vines off at the ground a few times a season before they can make more seeds to spread around does help a lot. i'll have to be doing a little poison ivy scouting and removal this fall too.
i see one wild grape vine which is up 20ft in a dead tree i'll have to find the root of that one and cut it off. i don't remove them because they are ok and hold the dead trees together. :) if i cut the vines down and put them someplace they might have a chance to reroot if not careful so i just leave them.
long day, tired, bed-time for bonzo here...
songbird
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