Wow, Popular Magazined advises dangerous procedures

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Picking and choosing your wood on a per project basis certainly affords you the ability to get straighter and flatter stock. If you buy "a lot" of wood you may not have that privilege. Some times you have to take what they have, to be able to fill the order and what they have may not all be able to go straight to the planer.
With that said, I use a planer jig/sled to assist in flattening one side if the long wide board that will not go through my jointer.
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Jeff wrote:

If the board starts out twisted or bowed, the planer will make a smooth board of even thickness--but it will still be twisted or bowed.
Chris
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Chris Friesen said:

We have a winner!
Greg G.
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Then you've never removed twist from a board.
Just for jollies, go to a big box and buy an 8' 2x8 with twist that you can see. The follow your procedure on one 4' length of that board with noticeable twist, until you are not able to discern any twist with your winding sticks. For comparison, face joint one face of the other board before thicknessing the opposite face.
What are the thicknesses of the two resulting dressed, non-twisted boards?
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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And to further confuse things, our English brethren have the right (IMHO) names for these machines: A planer (Am. "jointer") creates a surface or edge in a single plane, while a thicknesser (Am. "Planer") creates a board of uniform thickness (NOT one in a single plane).
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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American English *always* confuses things :)
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In article <bbf06e6c-497c-4bca-8f57-233786c81359

Come back when you learn what a jointer is for.
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Thu, Jan 17, 2008, 3:12pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: I just read an article by Glen D Huey of Popular Woodworking and he advises not using push stick or pads when using ht jointer. <snip>
Well, you know,if stupid was a crime, half the population would be in jain. Just a shame he's trying to convert people to being stupid too. I'm with you, on edge no push stick (unless it's very narrow), and push sticks and/or push pad otherwise.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I don't have a problem with a woman president - just not Hillary.
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On Jan 17, 10:07 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

A few weekends ago the TV was on DIY network or something like that while I was eating lunch. I watched some "carpenter" cross cutting using the rip fence as a guide. They even showed the cut piece get thrown about 30 feet.
Way to educate!
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On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 15:12:08 GMT, "Leon"

Face jointing without push pads? Why that's just plain dumb. And why does one need to know when the knives are hitting the high spots? You run it through, turn it over and if it hasn't cleaned up you go again. You're trying to create a flat plane, not find high spots.
Frank
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I stand convicted. I got used to doing just that exact manuever for that exact reason after I started using rubber faced gloves. I really like using them on the table saw too. I must admit my balls do crawl up inside a bit at the jointer whenever I do it. I have had others in the shop comment and I just shrugged it off.
Now that I think about it, one of my main saftey teaching statements is to say"Always think about what would happen if the board suddenly vanished. Where are your hands? What would happen?" This keeps me from pushing behind the TS or bandsaw blade, that's where I've seen the most problems. But this thread just convinced me... I'm an idiot. Never again.
ThanKs all.

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Leon wrote:

Maybe.
I've jointed stock that way with a major difference, no effort is exerted on the infeed side once at least 6" clears the cutterhead.
Most of the time, I use push blocks. The times I don't are when the stock is thick and heavy.
With or without blocks, once the stock passes the blades, both of my hands are on the outfeed side of the machine. I'm PULLING the work across the cutterhead. If my hand slips it goes AWAY from the blades.
A side benefit to pulling stock over a jointer is that the stock is always referenced to the outfeed surfaces, and the operator can't unintentionally rock the board as it moves.
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BUT that is if every thing goes well. If every thing goes well no precautions would need to be observed. What happens if the board you are running through shatters or the cutters hit an embedded nail or a knot?
The article provides pictures of thin stock.
You really need something and more than a glove between your hand the jointer cutters should the board not remain in tact.
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Having destroyed a number of pushsticks on a table saw, I find it cheap insurance to make or buy more if they save my fingers. I always try to keep fingers away from sharp edges, particularly powered sharp edges. I still have all 10 after over 30 years as a woodworker.

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On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 12:55:28 -0500, "EXT"

Pushsticks are disposable, make them by the dozens because they will come into contact with the spinning blade. That's what they're there for, to get closer to the blade than any rational person would ever allow their fingers to be.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Right on! Make lots! It's also great practice in pattern routing, shaping, and curved sawing to a line.
However, I like hooks and blocks much better than sticks:
<http://www.bburke.com/woodworking/shopmadejigsandtools.html
Some sticks can be dangerous and provide a false sense of security in respect to the hand's direction of travel and application of force.
For example: The standard "push stick" has the user providing force at about a 45 degree angle to the stock travel, with the hand moving towards the cutter and a small contact patch all the way out at the tip. If the stock sticks, jams, starts to kick back, etc... the stick goes away, and the hand moves directly at the cutter!
I always like to think of leaning on a door. If someone opens the door, I'll fall in. So... I don't lean on doors. <G>
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Agreed, however and hoping that the term push stick is a generic term, the examples shown by your link are what you should be using.
Those pointey sticks with a notch on the forward end probably cause as many accidents as they prevent. You really should use a push device that lets you hold down the work also. Typically a pointy push stick does nothing to prevent and often because of its lack of support will encourage kick back on a TS. Typically Kick back starts off as a minor deflection that can be prevented if you simply hold the work down and let the blade make its mark. Pointy sticks do nothing to prevent the beginning of a kick back to become a total kick back.
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I've been lucky and never had a kick back while using a push block but your hand is still moving toward the blade if things get spun out from under your hand, so caution and allowing the tool to do the work are always required. One has to watch out for over-confidence.
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Good link, Barry; thank you.
Good to see some decent reasoning too; good post.

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wrote:

I was using 'pushstick' as a generic term for anything that replaces your hand when pushing wood past a whirring, spinny, sharp thing. Use whatever type you think is effective.
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