Wow, is this safe?

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On 10/23/2015 10:30 AM, Leon wrote:

Agreed. My tapering sled is also used to cleanup boards with no straight edge.
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wrote:

The Jointer was the tool of the day back 50 or more years ago for tapers and stuff, and also for rabbits as in both cases they were very clean and precise cuts.
BTW the guard has to come off for rabbits, there is no other way.
But I was shocked at the 3/8 " cut he was making right out of the chute. I am surprised it didn't chock on it.
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On 10/23/2015 9:02 AM, Leon wrote:

Except as noted in my post, when the leg stock is too thick to cut on a 10" bladed table saw, compounded further by the use of a sled.
That, and exact repeatability, is why I have occasionally used the jointer to tape extra thick legs.
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Even in that circumstance, I think I'd opt for roughing it on the band saw, followed by cleanup on the jointer, rather than doing the entire job on the jointer.
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On 10/24/2015 1:20 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Tried that, went back to the ful lmonte jointer method on stock too thick to cut on the table saw.
Simply took too much time to get all legs to be exact replicas. Might be me just being anal, but I look closely at things like that and it bugs me no end to not see precisely dimensioned parts.
Much rather use one of my two tapering sleds, but simply can't cut 4" square leg stock on them, and those damned aluminum taper jigs are simply too treacherous ... waaaaay more so than the jointer method.
Not many people do it, was surprised to see it even mentioned here.
As usual, YMMV ...
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[...]

No argument there.
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On 10/24/2015 9:21 AM, Swingman wrote:

Absolutely, Thick legs/stock can be done on most any jointer, but in the example, the stock was not very big.
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Never ceases to amaze me that folks who have no clue, and who so obviously have no personal experience with regard to a woodworking procedure, will continue to expound hereabouts as if their wisdom in the matter is infinite and unquestionable.
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On 10/24/2015 9:25 AM, Swingman wrote:

.
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On 11/9/15 1:55 PM, Swingman wrote:

+100
I'm stealing that.
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Swingman wrote:

Hey! This is my first post to this thread, and I am a lot more humble than that! ; )
Bill
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On Thu, 22 Oct 2015 10:19:17 -0400

another thought is that a joiner is not at the top of the list of tools to get
i do not have a joiner and have no plans to get one but more importantly i have not needed one
so maybe he was asked to find a use for the joiner and do a video
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On 10/24/2015 10:26 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Europeans have been using a jointer to taper parts for longer than dodo and his video have been around.
Hell, you have to have decent jointer chops to use a jointer and NOT taper a part, that's why you typically joint one face FIRST, and plane the other parallel. ;)
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On 10/24/2015 6:39 PM, Swingman wrote:

Amen to that. Near impossible to pull off. I quit trying long ago. Same with snipe on a planer. I quit trying and simply add snipe to the cut off list when possible.
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On 10/24/2015 11:26 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Do you have a planer? Jointers and planers go hand in hand, but I use my jointer all the time, more than just for the planer, it is a very nice tool to have, and is about mandatory if you use a planer, or do much work with rough cut lumber.
Top of the list tool, probably not, nor is a planer, but they both are needed in a cabinet shop.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2015 11:33:55 -0400

i have a planer and deal with all kinds of old wood and found wood and craigslist wood which is in a class all by itself
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A planer without a jointer doesn't seem particularly useful to me, unless you always buy perfectly flat lumber (and if you do, please point me towards your supplier :-).
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On 10/26/15 11:39 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I have both, but my jointer is small and not much good for lengths over 4 feet. I usually buy lumber that is at least flat on one side, though.
A planer is also very useful for flattening joined panels. When making panels wider than my planer (13"), I will often only glue-up sections narrower than that, plane each one perfectly flat, then join those panels together for the final width. That leaves you with 1 or 2 glue joints to scrape even instead of a dozen or more.
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For the last few years, I've used the drum sander[*] in place of the planer for almost everything the planer was formerly used for; particularly for panels as well as for making one face coplaner with the other face. If I need to remove more than .125", I'll often drag out the Jet 15" planer, but more often than not I'll resaw thicker stock rather than discarding (composting) piles of shavings.
[*] Performax 22-44.
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On 10/26/2015 1:15 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Yeah! My Performax 22-44 sees lots of action too. If I can resaw the sander gets the work. If I need more than half the thickness of the stock the planer gets the work out.
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