Workshop ceiling thoughts

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I'm finally ready to consider the inside finishing of my new 24x30 dedicated workshop. For any semblance of heat in the NC winter, I need to put some kind of ceiling up to keep the heat from scrambling out of the ridge vents up top. My initial thought is to use 1/4" luan plywood, stapled to the trusses' lower chords. I also thought about drywall. Any good ideas, pros or cons, thoughts or rants? Thanks.
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I would probably either just use rockwool, or put up cheap plywood, then rockwool, to help absorb the noise from the shop. A hard surface will make your shop like the inside of a drum DAMHIKT
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I definitely agree with this. I worked in a shop where they enclosed the finishing loft to contain fumes. They used 1/4" luan and the noise resonating around the shop was wicked.
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I don't know anything about carpentry, but that doesn't stop me from giving an opinion... Cheap paneling is probably the most inexpensive material. I have never seen it used on a ceiling, so there is probably a good reason not to.
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Almost certain to sag.
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3/8" rough sawn plywood, also called roughtex. Most any decent lumber company will carry it.
Rent a panel lifter and if you don't have one, buy a BIG staple gun that can shoot the larger staples.(1-2")
http://www.portercable.com/index.asp?eT7&p &12
Jim Murphy wrote:

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Jim Murphy wrote:

Sheetrock "may" be needed to meet fire code. I'd check with your insurance agent before trying luan. I'd also add 6" or more of insulation. I'm planning on 8-12" here in SC. Once I clear enough floorspace for scaffolding or ladders to work on the 12' ceilings, the ones that already have lights and power outlets:-( Joe
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I would recommend the sheet rock and insulation.
1. Its not expesive 2. It's fire resistant 3. If you do puncture it its a easy fix as well. 4. I have been told its fire code around here.
Al
opinions are like A@#wholes everyone has one! :)

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No question in my mind either, sheet rock, period! A buddy on mine cheeped out and used 1/4" luan plywood on his ceiling. A year later he screwed sheet rock up after tearing the warped plywood out. This is one job you want to do once, do it right! Greg
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It's only required for fire code if there is living space on the other side. Since he said ridge vents, I don't think that's the case.

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Exactly... Here in CA you see houses with only the walls connected to the house being sheet rocked..

Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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What, no tongue and groove bead board? Come on, you're a woodworker... ;-)
I'd use 1/4 luan, but I'd nail or screw it. I wouldn't trust staples up over my head.
Also, make sure you mark where those trusses are before you cover them - it's quite handy to be able to screw in a hanger or something to the ceiling. Or your DC pipe. Or lights.
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Is it just me, or does this topic come up every few weeks? :)
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wrote:

I like the drywall idea. Easy to paint, cheap, keeps clean and non-flammable.
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wrote:

I used drywall after insulating. The first winter it was unfinished. No way to warm it up. After insulating and doing the drywall I can usually get by with turning the heat on for about a half hour or so then turning it off and I'm OK for most of the day. Exceptions for the coldest days. North Mississippi.
Drywall finishes smooth so dust doesn't cling excessively. I painted mine white and the floor light seemed to really increase with the same fixtures as compared to when it was unfinished.
Only downside in my view is having to float the drywall. I can do it but hate it.
Frank
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In a recent magazine article, I saw an idea for cutting the drywall in strips and laying them between the ceiling joists, suspended by cleats or battens fastened to the lower edge of the joists. It didn't mention how to treat the short drywall joints at the ends of the strips, but some cross blocking with similar cleats/battens should do it. No taping or joint compound required; provides utilities access advantage of a drop ceiling but no headspace is lost; fluorescent lighting fixtures can be installed between joists in place of some of the drywall strips; drywall strips can easily be replaced if damaged; much cheaper than a suspended ceiling; arguably easier to install than full 4'x8' drywall sheets; bottom of joists remain exposed to hang things from (however, respect their structural integrity and load capacity); drywall, cleats/battens and bottom of joists can be painted for light reflectivity before or after installation. Sounded like a win-win to me. Note that where ceiling drywall is required by code, this approach may not be acceptable.
David Merrill

dedicated
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I used foil faced foam board. It was easy for one man and a 'deadman' to handle. I also insulated between the rafters but I don't know if you want to go to much extent. I have seldom regretted doing too good of a job.
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Got rafters or studs?
I put 16" wide pieces of 1 1/2" rigid foam between the studs and then used drywall screws to cover it with (very cheap) white sort-of-wood paneling...
It made a nice quiet place out of a very loud room and keeps the heat out a bit in summer.. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I used 3/8" beadboard. Painted it white. No regrets.
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