Wooden Vise Screw

Hello all,
I am planning my workbench and would like to know if anyone can help me find a threadbox and tap to make 2" diameter screws for a tail and shoulder vise. The closest I can find anywhere online is 1 1/2" and I really want the extra 1/2". I have seen many pictures of old workbenches with 2" or larger screws and would like to know how I can make them for my own bench.
Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you, Bruce
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I found this site a while ago when I was looking for a dowel maker for a project I was working on. Has what you want but they are in Europe (should be no problem) and the prices seem extremely high. For the 2" version, you could buy a decent bench if I read it correctly.
http://www.fine-tools.com/gewind.htm
Good luck
David

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Cripes, it would be cheaper to go to a machinist and have the thread cutting parts made!
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A machinist can just make the wooden screw and you would be done with it. max

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You could do the threading on the wood itself (or "have done") on a metal lathe because it has a lead screw and gears to control the speed at which the threads are cut, governing the resulting threads per inch as well. It's merely the cutter to come up with...
http://www.bealltool.com/ has threading tools that work with a router but I don't think they go up to 2". They probably would make a 2" outfit for you.
Also, Scott Landis' "The Bench Book" shows how large threading apperatus were made and used. You could have those metal parts made and do the rest yourself.
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Bruce E. Harang II"

Never seen one - and if you did try to use a standard threadbox and tap for those sizes, it wouldn't work too well. You need a single point cutting tool and an edge grind that's more like a turning chisel than a blunt tap edge.
It's not that hard to make the screw by hand carving, if you read a few 18th century guides on how to do it. You can also use something like the Trend routerlathe to hog off a lot of timber, but they make a lousy thread profile - finsih it with a chisel.
All the modern >= 2" thread cutting I've seen has involved making the screw by hand, then making a nut-cutting tool that ran on the thread itself. You'll need a bit of metalworking knowledge, but it's not hard.
Another technique is to cast the nut in lead around the screw.
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On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 00:12:22 -0500, the inscrutable "Bruce E. Harang

Pick up a copy of Roy Underhill's book at your library or bookshop, then make your own tools and screws.
The Woodwright's Workbook Further Explorations in Traditional Woodcraft by Roy Underhill 259 pp., 81/2 x 11, 239 illus. $18.95 paper ISBN 0-8078-4157-9
    Table of Contents for The Woodwright's Workbook
Annotated Text of The Debate of the Carpenter's Tools Making Workbenches Making Screwboxes and Taps for Wood Threading ***************** Constructing Springpole and Treadle Lathes Building a Carpenter's Tool Chest Rustic Chairs Hickory-Bark Chair Bottoms Turned High Chair Weaving a Cattail Reed Chair Seat A Loom-Back Chair Ladders, Folding Bookstands, Eggbeaters, and Music Mills Making a Rowboat A Field Guide to American Tool Marks Building a Colonial Fort, a Barn, and a Blacksmith Shop
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