wooden casket

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out of lurk, Has anybody ever made one & what kind of wood did you use? I have an excentric friend that wants one to be buried in. I told him 'I am not Norm Abrams ' but I thought I could make it.
thanks guys in advance
regards
Mike Lane
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Here's a link to Rockler for a Wood Casket Plan and hardware: http://www.rockler.com/findit.cfm?page 0
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Walt Henderson made a beauty out of Poplar for the "Washington's Funeral" reenactment for Mt Vernon. They might have some pix on their website. I gave him a pick (jpeg) several years ago, he might still have it. I don't know if he wants it posted or not. He MIGHT be copying the mail, and could chime in if he is.
Dave in Fairfax
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Use Oak. I wouldn't be caught dead in anything else.
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Dave, you're killing me......... <G>
Dave Hinz wrote:

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Some people pine for the classic box, Others prefer another material, just to spruce up the scene, But, that's going a bit fir.
On the other hand, there's only *one* acceptable wood for a crematory urn. It's even described in the Bible -- "Ashes to ash, ....."
Seriously, I've seen (modern) caskets (apparently) made from walnut, ebony, and maple.
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I wonder - what would custom caskets sell for? Profitable, I assume? I know the local undertaker, maybe he'd work some sort of commission deal.
Dave Hinz
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Thanks guys for all the info. I have conferred with him some more & he said " I want an old timey casket , ( like in wild west) with wood straight from a sawmill, nothing fancy, plain jane " I told him that would not be a prob, but, I expected him to live a while longer, as it will take me a while to make.
again thanks for all replies back to lurk Mike Lane
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Caskets are _not_ inexpensive. I've got no idea what the mark-up is between wholesale and retail, but it wouldn't surprise me if its double, or more.
I'm not sure how viable a market it'd be for 'custom' work. There isn't much lead time -- i.e., from order placement to delivery required.
Then there are the construction requirements. Yup, before you can be buried in it, there are _legal_ specifications that have to be dealt with. Prevention of things like contamination of the water-table, etc. Bluntly, a decomposing body is not a particularly healthy thing to have around. <wry grin>
Now, for cremations, that's a whole 'nuther story.
Couldn't hurt to inquire, I suppose.
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wrote:

ebony,
deal.
between
much
buried
Prevention
decomposing
Hi -
Actually - there aren't many regulations concerning caskets at all...though there may be local bylaws about using grave liners (concrete boxes)... In many places, you can use a cardboard box or a shroud if you want to. Likewise, embalming may also be optional - there's no "health" reason to do it....
Most burial regulations are concerned with "where" as opposed to how....
Best bet is to check your state/provincial laws directly.
Cheers -
Rob
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Recently I had occasion to go to a funeral parlor for a funeral, but I needed to change clothes before the service. They let me use a room where they had all the "demo boxes" so customers (once removed, I assume" could see the different qualities of coffins. They had metal, wood, particle boare and, yes, plain old ordinary cardboard. The cardboard box, however cost $90 (US). I was amazed!
Glen
"Robin Lee" wrote >

all...though
do
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Thu, May 6, 2004, 12:22pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) says: <snip> Then there are the construction requirements. Yup, before you can be buried in it, there are _legal_ specifications that have to be dealt with. Prevention of things like contamination of the water-table, etc.  <snip>
I haven't double-checked this, but from what I've come across, in various places, it isn't that much of a problem. Because, the caskets are buried in a container of some sort. So, it wouldn't really matter if just a cardboard box was used, because it would be inside a "vault", or whatever they call them.
JOAT If you think dogs can't count, try putting three dog biscuits in your pocket and then giving Fido only two of them. - Phil Pastoret
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On Thu, 06 May 2004 14:21:43 -0400, J T wrote:

In some places such as New Orleans, the big problem is keeping 'em planted as the water table is so high.
The cardboard box is a common choice when the final destination is the oven.
-Doug
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depend on the support of Paul." - George Bernard Shaw
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A fews years back, when I was in school, a classmate made one in shop class out of black walnut. He got help from the home ec. dept in making the red crushed velvet liner. It came out beautiful. It was just big enough for his fathers' pistol. It was a fathers day gift.
Michael Lane wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Michael Lane) wrote in message

Have you considered MDF?
Run a router round the edges, add some moldings from your local borg, spray paint with a couple of coats of emulsion.
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Take pity on those that will move the casket. About the only thing heavier than MDF is lead. Also, MDF doesn't do well when it gets wet.
If you've ever looked carefully at a casket (removed the satin drapes and lifted out the bed) you saw that it was mostly cardboard. The part you see looks substantial, but it's all for show.
The funeral business is really a high margin cheap furniture business.
RB
Phillip Hallam-Baker wrote:

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In Victorian times they used to use lead cofins.
As for getting wet, a couple of coats of high gloss emulsion should do the trick.

Just wait, at some point in the future Krispy Creme will adapt the machine they use to glaze their donuts. If you replaced the donut glaze with a polymer coating that hardens on exposure to UV you could coat one side of the corpse, harden, flip, harden the other side.
If you made the plastic opaque you could then have a CAD machine injet a likeness of the deceased onto the outside of their shell, or alternatively leave blank for a more classical look.
Best of all it will be possible to keep your deceased loved ones with you in your house, forming a decorative sculpture that is sure to be a talking point for every visitor.
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On 8 May 2004 10:15:46 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Phillip Hallam-Baker) wrote:

It is already possible when you have them cremated.
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Jaime wrote:

Cremains can be pressed into diamonds.
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(Phillip Hallam-Baker)

Better yet, put the ashes in an hourglass and the deceased can keep working. Imagine timeing your eggs for breakfast with the remains of your Aunt Bertha?
;-) Glen
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