Wood finishing..a bit long.

Been lurking here quite a while...
The situation is this, I have a south facing sunroom/extension on the back of my house built by the previous owner, I've hired a contractor to replace the windows, exterior door and exterior siding (going vinyl to match the rest of the house.
I plan on doing the interior myself, new wood casing/ledges around the windows, beadboard on interior walls/ceiling, probably in pine. It gets *very* hot in there in the summer, even on sunny days in the winter. So I was figuring on using an exterior grade finish on the pine, for the extra UV protection. I have a Bostitich compressor 6 gallons, rated for 3.4 CFM @ 40 PSI and 2.1 CFM @ 90 PSI, do you think it should work with this:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p 048&cat=1,43456,43390&ap=1
Maybe dialed down to 60 or 70 PSI?
Also was thinking of one of the Cabot Australian Oil finishes, I put it on my deck, and wooden lawn furniture earlier this year with a brush and was quite impressed. Or would you suggest something else to finish the wood surfaces.
Any opinions? Toronto, Ontario if that may affect your opinions.
Thanks in advance
Mini gloat, Lee Valley is only ten minutes away. :-)
--

Life would be so much easier if we could just look at the source code.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have no opinion on the finishes problem but this is important: Get the correct coatings on all the glass to filter out the UV rays. Otherwise the sun will be very destructive to anything and everything which is in there; fabrics, books, plastics wood, whatever. The filters will also keep the temperature down considerably. Then you won't have to worry about exterior grade finishes indoors.
Tim w
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim W took a can of maroon spray paint on August 14, 2007 05:08 pm and wrote the following:

that, they are supposed to start the install next week, windows had to be custom made.
--

Life would be so much easier if we could just look at the source code.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You compressor should work with that. I remember when those were the rage with woodworkers simply because they WOULD work with your air compressor. Rember that it is a simple blaster type system that will push material in front of a single nozzle of air. It is probably similar to spraying from a can. I can't imagine it doing a great job of atomizing the material, but that thing has sure been around a long time for it not to work at least pretty well.
I do know you will need to thin your product pretty well. Note the construction of that gun requires material to travel up the tube (not a siphon tube) to get in front of the nozzle. This will take a little pressure (5 lbs or so if it like a small pressure cup), and of course a large nozzle on the pressure side to disperse/atomize the material will take more pressure. So I wouldn't worry about turning downt the compressor too much until you try it out.
Get a dryer for the air lines. Get a new 25' hose and fittings if you can (cheap insurance for your new paint rig) and get a regulator you can handle mount behind the gun rather than rely on the regulator on the compressor.
I really like the idea from this thread of installing UV resistant glass. But if it too late, you might consider coatings (like on a car).
Since this will not be a surface exposed to footwear, hard use, or anything much more than dusting, I would think any quality UV resistant coating should work as long as it gave a cleanable surface.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

this works by forming a low pressure area over the tube, causing suction to draw up the material. it doesn't inject air into the jar.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com took a can of maroon spray paint on August 14, 2007 05:22 pm and wrote the following:

until the windows are in, then I have to install all the wood, before any finishing. Exploring options with the experts seemed like a good idea, haven't bought the gun, and I could always brush it, but .... this seemed like more fun. :-)
Any major issues using an exterior finish indoors? Other than ventilate while it cures.
It isn't what I would describe as a living area, but when we open the back door, anything could rush in.
--

Life would be so much easier if we could just look at the source code.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 21:40:02 GMT, FrozenNorth

I would be wary of using an exterior finish indoors. My single experience, which was enough to never do it again, was painting my entry door with exterior paint (the outside side). It took forever to fully cure. Good thing it was on the outside and I could close it off.
Don't know if that's "normal" or applicable with today's products (this was ~5 years ago). But, that's my 2 cents worth.
Renata

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.