Why did Grizzly raise their prices?

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The beginning of the end of Detroit came about 20 years ago.
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Doubt it. People may buy junk tools and toasters, but cars that fall apart don't last long in the market. You will notice a steady churn in the cheap models arena as people keep looking for a cheap *good* car. One doesn't exist because it costs too much to make a car good, but people keep trying. Only if they bring quality will they stand a real chance in the US auto market, and then they will have to be able to compete on price against the other low-cost imports.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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wrote:
You think so, still remember those tin can shit in the 60's, Datsun or Toyota? Toyota is the best-selling car today surpasses even GM, while Ford is struggling to remain as a major player:-)
Never, never underestimate your competitors. There are differences between our manufacturers here and elsewhere. In Japan, I presume later China; Our manufacturers are more interested in big buck NOW, or how much they can rip us today. While they (Japan, Taiwan, China etc.) gave us what some of us could not never afford, No?
Look at the drugs' companies...racking billions and they do not allow our govt. to negotiate for lower prices. Go to any HF and buy a set of hole saw for two-ninety-nine, or looking longingly at a US-MADE hole saw for fifty bucks. Maybe, they should enact laws, only family with more than $200,000 income are allow to have woodworking hobby (just joking and I really do not mean it).
We can argue till the cow come home in the evening who is right.
Greed is what killing.

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Our dollar is losing value. Our government is spending a million dollars every 7-1/2 minutes for some kind of a war. Eventually they will print more money in attempt to get out of debt. Recently I traded a hand saw made in China for one made in the USA of equal dollar, but the USA saw is much better.
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I'm sure they thought long and hard about it. Increases in shipping costs, steel, plastics, have all gone up considerably. In my business, we are paying 40% more for raw material in December than we did in May. We raised prices to cover it but some customer refused to pay any increase. We said goodbye; we don't work for free or at a loss. These customers went to one of our competitors that did not raise prices figuring to cash in and get market share. . That company no longer exists as of early December.
We are a small company. When we open for business on Monday, material cost aside, our cost of operation will be $225,000 more than last year to make the same amount of product. Fuel, insurance, rent. (no wage increases included) Grizzly is probably faced with a similar situation so no, they are not shooting themselves in the foot; they are planning to survive. They must make money or die. Delta and Jet will probably be doing the same.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

The overriding question I keep asking myself the past few years:
Are things really getting worse, or is it just this old fart stage of life?
Despite the fact that here in Houston it cost me approximately 52% more in material costs to "dry in" the same size house in 2004 than it did in 2002, there is NO inflation, doncha know.
And the collective "tax spenders" love it ... it cost's more to build a house, therefore the house costs more, therefore it can be appraised at a higher valuation by an authority cleverly NOT beholden to the voter/tax payer, thereby increasing the tax "ba$e" for perks, boondoggles and self perpetuation of the "tax spenders" of a all stripes.
Example abound of just how collectively stupid/naive the populace, and how twisted the economic thinking, have become:
A couple of months back there was an article in the local paper with the headlines" "Windfall for Tax Payers".
The gist of the article was that due to higher real estate property valuations in our 'city of homes', there was going to be vastly more money in the city coffers in 2005.
Think about that for a few seconds (or minutes if you suffer from a state-of-the-art education).
Shirley, I am thinking, this is a tongue-in-cheek joke and the punch line is soon to follow, right? I mean, "Windfall for Taxpayers"??
Hell NO ... "they" (the author, and interviewed bureaucrats) were serious and presented the article with a straight face, apparently blissfully unaware of just where/who the hell that "windfall" revenue was coming!
And, although it was not apparent for a while, it is getting difficult to NOT notice that where prices have actually been maintained, quality has declined substantially.
We are apparently thought too stupid to notice that maintaining low inflation, as an economic index, ultimately equals lower quality goods?
Again, examples abound: The t-shirts at Sam's are the same $5 price they were in 2002, but instead of the generous use of "heavyweight cotton" of two years ago, the material is thin and decidedly less generous for the same sized product. (Anyone remember the "victory cigarettes" in G. Orwell's "1984", or is that tome too possibly damaging to self-esteem for current educational purposes?)
And just how will all these laid off folks be able to support $13/lb steak prices? And do you REALLY believe that China produces the same quality goods as Europe and the US have for decades? And has "reality TV" already replaced "religion" as the "opium of the people", as you watched?
But I digress ... back to the original question?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
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A while back, I heard a radio report where the report questioned employees of a Carolina textile plant buying Chinese made clothing in the hometown Wal-Mart. Apparently, "Buy American" means you should buy MY stuff, while I'll buy the cheapest crap I can, and not talk about YOUR job going away. But when MY job goes to China, I'll cry on the TV news that Wal-Mart ran my factory out of bidnet.
Support your neighbor for real, or sooner or later, the hypocrisy is going to drag us all down a hole.
Barry
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I agree. While Amazon has some amazing deals, I feel it is only because they still have some competition. Their free shipping and discount pricing is very attractive, but what happens when all of the little guys are driven out of business? I used to subscribe to Fine Woodworking and a couple of the other WW mags. There used to be full page ads for tools from at least a dozen sellers. I picked up a copy recently and there were no such ads. Amazon either killed or bought the competition. We are circling the drain as a country that used to lead the world in competition, quality and innovation. max

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"max" wrote in message

LOL ... I like the "poetic justice" nature of that imagery!
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That might be an interesting story. I live near Coastal Tool and Tools Plus, two independent web vendors. Both say they make a fair profit at Amazon's price, both routinely beat BORG prices. Both vendors existed before Al's 'net, both were savvy enough to get online. Since the item is already there, shipping is included, but they collect tax. Legally, we in CT are required to pay use tax on web and out of state purchases, so technically the tax is a wash.
We've actually had Western Tool move into the state to fill some of Woodworker's Warehouse voids. Woodworker's Warehouse killed themselves. <G>

Woodshop News is full of tool vendor ads in CT, MA, and a large one in "Tax Free NH". WSN may do regional issues as far as ads go, I'm not sure.

I agree with most of what you said, but Amazon is simply one American vendor competing with the rest. Mail order is as old as the mail.
Crap, with the exception of those screwy 4 hour sales, Ballew Tool, Coastal, Tools Plus, Lee Valley, Highland Hardware, Museum of Woodworking, BC Saw, etc... seem to me to be better places to buy anyway.
By "neighbor", I meant American, Canadian, or other free living citizen, that lives in a non-market dumping, free country. For example, bicycle parts plants. The atmosphere there is similar to Lie Nielsen. People who take pride in what they do, and make a product that is top quality. I don't think a Chinese factory is quite the same.
Although, I do avoid BORGs and chain restaurants as well as I can. <G>
Barry
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My thinking over my 52 years has changed, and as I get nearer to retirement my dream of retiring to woodworking as an income making part time job has vanished also. But it's because everything changes, you can't fight it, you either embrace change and move forward, or fight it. (ten years ago that statement would have pissed me off! Hard to believe I now actually agree with it) Some simple illustrations to my point. How many blacksmiths do we need today verses 150 years ago? How many auto mechanics do we need today verses 100 years ago? How many computer technicians do we need today verses 50 years ago. How many composite lumber manufacturers did we have 30 years ago? Any farmers out there I don't mean this statement generically because I grew up in a farming community, and have friends who are both successful at farming and those who are not. I'm just citing this one real example. I have a relative who is a farmer. He thinks he should be able to make a living farming 100 till able acres, his dad did. But he (son) has his satellite tv, cell phones, and routine eating out, nice home, late model cars, and machinery that get his crops in and out less than a month a year. Gee's, I'd sure like to be able to support my family on 1 month of work a year! But he's hung up that it's the corporate farmers that are driving him out of business. He's lost in the mire of not understanding farming has changed, and if you try to make a farm of 70 years ago produce the same relative income, under the same business model you just can't. Same goes for almost anything our country has in good or services. I do business with a number of small specialty machine shops, they are so busy they can't see straight have been for years, and their making money like they have never made before. Why, because mass production of the same part 100,000 times at a few cents profit is difficult to compete with countries who's economic model is cheaper than ours. But those who have embraced the short run, prototype business, are raking in the money. If you watch tv, or live in the city, you know that many of the "Orange County Choppers" or "West Coast Custom's" are building very expensive custom one of a kind machines, and business is good.
Human nature is to be value minded consumers, if not, Walmart and the likes wouldn't have any business. Your can't fool with free enterprise.
Back to woodworking, those who do very high end custom stuff I suspect are doing better than the one trying to build bookcases.
No flames please, I'm not trying to start an argument, just my personal perspective. If I'm right or wrong isn't important to me, just my 2 cents is all.
Phil
Ba r r y wrote:

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On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 21:04:43 -0600, Phil wrote:
[snip of wisdom]

Amen!
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


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When we opened our shop in SF we made $20 the first month. The second month we made $120 thanks to our landlord. The second year we pulled in over $150K. No advertising, no down time, 4 month backlog. You get connected with the group (economic level?) you are aiming for. We wanted high end stuff and that is all we did. Our names were passed around and we had more work than we could handle. max

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On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 20:54:57 -0700, Doug Winterburn

By and large I think you're right.
One of the great lies we tell our kids is that they can train for a job and expect to that job until they retire. With very few exceptions that isn't true any more. The average worker will have 2 or 3 or more 'careers' over the course of their working life.
Sometimes the jobs change names and sometimes they don't, but you end up doing something very different over time.
The smart way to handle this, I think, is to decide what you're truly excellent at -- not just what you're skilled at, but what truly turns you on. That gives you a basic skill set and you have to keep looking for ways to apply that skill set and that level of excellence. I guarantee you it will keep you interested and it's more than likely to keep you fully employed.
I was thinking about this tonight as I was making out invoices for customers. Back in mumblety-mupfh I graduated with a degree in journalism and a minor in advertising. I haven't worked for a newspaper or wire service in 25 years and I never worked in advertising. Today most of my customers are web sites. But I'm still working and, by and large, I'm still enjoying it.
And oh yeah -- there are still a lot of gainfully employed blacksmiths out there.
--RC
"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 20:54:57 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Our very own Tom Plamann, Phully Laird, Sigh Kaplan, Kim Whitmyre, and Tawm Watson are all pretty good proof of that premise, wot?
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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"Phil" wrote in message

County
of a

Yabbut, how long will that last? While there is undoubtably "riches in niches", your example is of a very limited market, further supported by the entertainment industry of which they have no control, and is certainly not a market that you can build a national economy upon.
Throwing a bit of history into the mix, in feudal times a business model like that only lasted until favour was lost with the ruling class, or until the ruling class got bored and went on to some other form of entertainment..
... sound vaguely familiar?
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When that happens you change your niche. If you're fixiated on the idea that a market will continue to exist for a long time you're setting yourself up for trouble in the modern world.
So no, I don't think that in 20 years "Orange County Choppers" or whatever will still be building the products they are today. I couldn't tell you what products they will be building. But if they're smart they'll still be occupying a very profitable niche somewhere.
--RC
"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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OCC=Soap Opera
wrote:

"Orange
one
the
not a

until
entertainment..
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On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 00:09:48 GMT, "Bullwinkle J. Moose"
Well, there's always been a strong market for soap opera.
--RC

"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
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I wouldn't disagree with that at all. I rarely watch it, but the point is still valid.
Markets change, jobs and skills change, not much doesn't. I was sitting trying to think of something that probably didn't change a lot, came up with bartender and minister, but even they have different skills they utilize than the did 30 years ago. Bur if I were a bartender I'd be studying for a different job. One of these days, a robot that is either a babe or a hunk, and can mix and pour straight from their finger is gonna take that job over.... :-) But, that minister job is rock solid, we humans got sin in our jeans......... :-)
"Bullwinkle J. Moose" wrote:

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