Why are trim screws so long?

I need to repair a cracked leg in a finished piece of furniture (chair). I plan on gluing it and even ordered a glue injector and titebond 'dark' wood glue from Rockler to do the job. But I also wanted to reinforce it with a trim screw or two but the shortest I can find is 1 5/8" long. Is that the smallest size available?
If so why would they be so long? I've only ever used trim screws to screw cabinet face frames together and screw some squeaky treads to the risers (didn't work). However if I were to use them to attach a piece of 'trim' I sure wouldn't need one 1 5/8" long.
What do you guys use them for besides holding pieces together until the glue dries?
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On 9/7/2009 5:43 PM Limp Arbor spake thus:

Do you mean a "trim head screw", like this?
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product/0715-HTB/Brown-7-x-1-58quot-HeadCote-Stainless-Steel-Trim-Head-Screws
When I read your post I didn't know what a "trim screw" was; never heard that term before.
Why not just use a small wood screw? You're wanting a small head, I take it. Maybe counterbored bigger screws and wood plugs are the way to go.
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Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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AFAIK, yes.

Sure you would. The screw passes through 1/2" thick trim, then 1/2" thick drywall, leaving 5/8" of threads in the framing.

I use brads for that...
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I rarely use screws to hold things together while glue dries, If I want just glue, I use clamps with padding as needed. Like almost everyone, when repairing furniture I try for as invisible a repair as possible
If a conventional C-clamp doesn't seem to be appropriate because the shape is too irregular, then maybe a cord clamp or surgical hose, or a hose clamp padded inside with 1/4" thick rubber.
Be sure to wipe the excess glue off after you compress the joint, but you do want to leave enough glue in the joint and not squeeze it all out. Depending on the glue you use and the item being glued, you might even coat the area you do not want glue on with a wax release (like Waxlit)

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On 9/7/2009 7:39 PM Matt spake thus:

One of the most useful tools I have is my collection of old cut-up bicycle inner tubes. They can exert tremendous clamping force simply by wrapping them around the glue-up. Holds odd-shaped pieces too.
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If it's really a crack, you're gluing into end grain? Or is it a split, gluing long grain? Cracks are a hard problem, splits are less hard, BUT a split might have found a sap element, glue can easily fail there.
Instead of pinning the joint with metal fasteners, consider careful boring and fitting of dowels; a glued dowel across the grain makes a tough reinforcing element.
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On Mon, 7 Sep 2009 17:43:00 -0700 (PDT), Limp Arbor

I use all sizes. Recently I installed trim and used 2" finish nails in a pnumatic nailer. When I got to the wall that encases a pocket door, I used 1-1/4". Angle the shot slightly downward.
Sometimes I like the nail gun for furniture repair. Unlike a screw or common finish nail it rarely splits the wood
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