when is it too cold to work?

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I believe this is a matter of personal preference. For me, it is too cold to work, exactly one degree below when it is too hot to work. <G>
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On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 02:36:31 -0500, Silvan

Can't blame 'em, really. A lot of the log haulers I've known seem to delight in driving 7 day a week, 18-20 hours a day on icy roads with one headlight out, broken springs and bald tires traveling 25 over the limit while hauling 15,000 lbs over weight. I've heard of those guys getting DOT tickets in excess of $3,500 and just paying it as a routine cost of doing business. When hauling logs was profitable it was *really* profitable.
Of course this was NE Washington state, local mileage may vary.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

I don't think anybody is getting that rich, but it sounds like the type. Chip and bull haulers too. The last of the cowboy supertruckers.
Back when this road used to go somewhere, before they cut it in half with a new highway, trucks used to use this street to get out to the place where they shred up all the Christmas trees they collect at the end of the season.
I was in the house one day, and heard an incredibly loud metal wrenching sound. I went out to see what the hell had happened.
It was a chip hauler loaded with mulch. His trailer broke in the middle and collapsed to the ground. The sides bowed out, and it spewed mulch all over the place. The steer axle was a foot off the ground, and he couldn't get the thing out of the road.
Guy tried to tell me he had scaled only 20,000 pounds.
His tires were down to the wires too.
Gack. I give those things a *wide* berth now.
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Silvan wrote:

You've got my sympathy. Driving in MI on 131 about 30 years ago I had the trailer show up next to my window. Couldn't figure out who had the same load I was carrying around here or why their emblem was backwards. Tappped my Johnny brake and used the trailer to straighten us back out. Definitely check your shorts. Sorry you don't enjoy driving, I loved seeing this country go by, especially the northern and southern loops. Just the paperwork and idiots for problems, and you get that with any job. Dave in Fairfax
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My shop in central Maine is unheated so far. Eventually it gets too cold to work in there, no matter how much I would like to.
A lot of stuff like gluing and painting stops below 50 Degree F. That stops a lot of my work right there. Below 30 I start noticing how everything in there is made of steel and is so damn cold I need to work with gloves. About that time the lights stop coming on and the batteries for my portable tools freeze. At this point I reluctantly close the door and go find something else to do until Spring.
My $.02
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snipped-for-privacy@fairfax.com wrote:

The weather here was actually bad enough to make the national news. Second-hand account, since I don't watch TV, but Mom said the Today Show on NBC did a piece on how the nasty weather was causing a huge number of wrecks on the new bypass (the one outside my bedroom window) in Christiansburg, VA. I probably narrowly missed my big shot at the limelight. I could have been nationally recognized as "that guy in the orange hat who crashed into a wall in some town I never heard of in Virginia." :)

Whee ha. I'm glad that didn't end badly!

There are parts of it I like, and parts of it I hate. This time of year, I get gloomy. Winter *scares* me. I've been through enough adversity by now that I should be over that, but I'm not. Not by a long shot. I definitely miss the work-a-day world this time of year.
In spring, it will be different. I love how long my springs are as a truck driver. When things start to bloom down in Georgia, it makes it that much easier to bear winter here in Virginia, because I can see what's coming just around the corner.
In the end though, the reason I have to find a new job in the next few years is because it's just beating me up. My right knee is almost completely shot, and I want to get out while I can still qualify this with an "almost." Winter only happens once a year, but the knee pain is my constant companion.
Since retiring at 35 is probably not a real option, I'm going to have to come up with something else. :)
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On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 01:56:46 -0500, Silvan

Why not slap some fiberglass batts between the studs now and plan on reusing them when you build the palace? It'll prolly save you a bunch in electricity costs.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Thinking about it. It would help if I didn't have so many things between the studs. I'm not sure I could get enough insulation in there to do any good without ripping my shop apart and putting it back together.
Is anything better than nothing, or is it pretty pointless to do any of it if I'm not going to do all of it?
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On Sat, 06 Dec 2003 12:03:15 -0500, Silvan

IMNSHO, something slowing down heat transfer is better than nothing, especially higher up and on the ceiling. Behind the cabinets is probably not as important. There is some insulation value already, albeit not very efficient. Also, you could put some styrofoam outside on the vertical portion of the walls. Think of reusing it on your future ceiling/roof.
Luigi The wreck's self-proclaimed expert on cold weather. Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address. Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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The tried and true method for determining if it is too cold to work in your shop is a method I use all the time, as follows: Go to your table saw bend over and stick your tongue to the bed, if it sticks, its too cold if not go ahead.

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:

================That is the dumbest way I ever heard of... tried it once and almost froze out in the shop because it was pure hell dragging the tablesaw up to the house with my tongue stuck to it because my hands could not reach any good points to get a grip.... NOW I just pick up one of my chisels ... IF it sticks to my tongue It is no problem walking into the house... NO PROBLEM AT ALL..
Actually I do have some glue ups to do today and it is 27 degrees and snowing outside now... in less then an hour my shop will be up to 65 (my prefered working temp) and I will be set to go... only question is I still have to check if I have gas in the snowblower ...
Bob G..
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I would think the glue is the least of your worries. If something is built and glued at a cold temp. once it is brought into the house, the wood will expand. This will result in joints loosening and possibly wood splitting. Think about it, it is recommended to have wood flooring in the environment for 48 hours before installation. If you build a bookshelf in a shop which is, lets say 60 degrees then bring it in your house which is 70 degrees. The wood will expand and possibly ruin your work.
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PPH notes:

Yes, but when you add chalked glue--which is what happens to PVA glue applied under about 60 deg. F.--you have a weak glue joint to add to extreme wood movement, almost a guarantee of a project that will quickly fall apart. And it makes no difference if you take warm glue out of the house: apply it to 45 deg. wood, and you get the same chalky looking glue joint, which will fail prematurely.
Charlie Self
"I have as much authority as the Pope, I just don't have as many people who believe it." George Carlin
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Charlie Self wrote:

Chalky... That describes the glue that "didn't look right" in a previous post.
Too cold then.
Well, those frames are nailed to the trays they surround, and the corners are secured with brads. They'll probably be fine.
I shellacked them, then waxed them before bringing them in, if that makes any difference.
It's been in the house for 48 hours now, and it still looks gorgeous. Do you think I should be worried about impending doom, or am I out of the woods?
It took me a month to make this thing, so if this explodes, Dad isn't getting his present. There just isn't enough time.
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You know it's too cold to work when the lights in your shop won't come on because the power lines are down due to freezing weather and all of the oil lamps are in the house doing domestic duty. To prevent this tragedy I now have 14 kerosene lamps (4 Aladdin) and 12 kerosene lanterns and 3 gas lanterns. No I don't collect them they just seem to like to settle here. Feeding them can be a problem but they do put out the heat.

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It's supposed to be in the low 60's here tomorrow, and as far as I'm concerned, that's too cold to hang Xmas lights.
My shop shares space with the washer and dryer, so if it gets too cold in there, I just do a load of laundry. Warms it right up.
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Isn't the stray sawdust a little hard on the lint trap?? or do you use it as dust collector??
wrote:

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On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 23:00:45 -0600, "Sweet Sawdust"

Yes. <G>

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T. wrote:

Cardboard... That's a good, cheap thought.

I have the door leak controlled somewhat. I nailed a thick comforter across the doorway, and it really cuts down on air infiltration. Sort of like your strip idea, but I can't see through it.

I definitely need a replacement. There are some holes in the T11 where I poked my finger through by accident. The spring rains, and the summer rains, and the fall rains. I found active termite colonies doing their bit. Half of it sits on an un-sealed slab 1/2" off the ground, and half of it sits 1/2" below grade, with the supports directly on the ground. The previous owners were old, they were cheap, and it lasted all they needed it to last, but it sure isn't much good now.
So I'm just hoping I don't fall through the floor for another two years or so, until I can do something else.

Small travel trailer, maybe. Anything bigger is out. I don't actually own half of one side yard. The government bought it as a right-of-way for a power line they had to relocate to my side of the street. Somehow, they never offer to come cut that part of the grass. The other side yard is where I play ball with my boy. Some things are more important than workshops.
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 16:27:03 -0500 (EST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (T.) scribbled

JOAT is right. I've got 2 ceramic heaters going in my 14'X28' shop right now and the shop is at about 15 degrees (60 Fahrenheit, Keith). It's -14 outside (7 Fahrenheit, Keith).

There are 4 doors in my shop - a garage door and a regular door on the front side, and two doors in the back (one into the greenhouse). No weatherstripping. No insulation on the ceiling, as there is an unheated solarium above the garage.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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