What saw blades do you use?

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Ok, you have a tablesaw, a RAS and a Mitersaw. What blades do you use in each?
Thanks
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Forrest Woodworker II in the TS and RAS. The chopsaw just has the stock blade that came with it -- but then, the chopsaw never gets used for any fine woodworking, just cutting 2x lumber to size.
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wrote:

Perhaps I should elaborate.
What type of blade? Ex: Crosscut blade, Thin Kerf Blade, Rip blade, etc.
Thanks
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Freud P410, Freud P410 and Freud P410. Works for me.
Max
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Well, in my chop saw, a cross cut blade. In my table saw, if I'm ripping a rip blade. If I'm doing a bunch of crosscuts with the sled, a crosscut blade.
I have a thin kerf rip blade that I might use if there's a reason to need to save a sixteenth per cut.
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Correction: WWII in the TS, WWI in the RAS

The Woodworker II is a combination blade, WWI is a crosscut. And of course the blade in the chop saw is a crosscut.
Thin-kerf blades are not needed except on underpowered saws.

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On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 21:44:04 -0500, SBH wrote:

In my tablesaw, a Freud Fusion combination blade. It's an ATB. It cuts as smooth, if not smoother, than a Forrest. But I do wish it was an ATBR, I don't like the V bottom on non-through cuts.
Never had or wanted a RAS. Chop saws are great for high volume repetitive work, but as a hobbyist I can't justify one. If I can't do it on a table saw, a bandsaw, or a scroll saw, it's time for the hand tools :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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That would be, types of blades.
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TS has a WWII for finish cuts, whether rips or crosses. If I have a lot of either to do (especially ripping), I'll switch to a dedicated ripping blade. Nothing fancy there, I think it's a freud.
don't own a ras.
Mitre saw. Currently has a rough carpentry blade on it, good for tubbafors, chopping offcuts into kindling and little else. If I'm doing molding, I'll put on a 60 tooth (it's a 12").
HTH's,
jc
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On the TS I use the Freud 24 tooth thin kerf rip or 30 tooth glue-line rip for most of my fine work. I use a Forrest Woodworker II 30 tooth for ripping thick hardwood. I use an 80 tooth Freud for cross cutting on the TS.
My biggest advice would be to say don't use a combo blade. Get a blade for rippping and a blade for cross cut on the TS.

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OK - I just gotta go for the low hanging fruit.
"The appropriate one?"
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TS: Forrest WW II (20 degree (?) hook, 40 tooth combo blade) RAS: Forrest WW I (-5 degree hook, 60 tooth combo blade) MS: Disston 20" backsaw with ~15 TPI with light set in a very old, very heavy Stanley miter box
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Delta Unisaw (Great White): Leitz 10X40 AT&R blade. Backup: 2 - Delta 10X 60 's
DeWalt 12" Mitersaw: DeWalt 12 X 40 and 12 X 60 blades
No RAS
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SBH wrote:

TS - 24 tooth thin rip. Thin because I often cut tape for edging and I hate to waste wood :)
RAS - 40 tooth ATB
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dadiOH
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sharp ones
len
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I have use a bunch of blades over the last 30 years, I have setteled on Forrest.
I only use a Forrest WW2 regular Kerf 40 thooth blade in my TS. I have 2 so that when one is out being resharpened I don't have to do without.
This blade comes in thin kerf but I would not recomend it for best results.
This blade does perfect rips, cross cuts, miter cuts, bevel cuts and compound angle cuts. Basically with this blade and a properly set up TS you do not need another blade for cutting.
I have a Forrest DadoKing for dado's.
I would use a Forrest WW 1 for my RAS if I still hade it.
I would use a Forrest ChopMaster for a miter saw.
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It's an ATB. But I do wish it was an ATBR,
Nice, detailed response. I read the posts as I was interested in blade recommendations from serious folks.
I've all three saws mentioned and have quite a selection of 10" blades (and a smaller selection of 12" blades for my, relatively new, Miter Saw).
In the past, my criteria was the number of carbide teeth offered per dollar(s) $pent. And, I suspect, I've owned as many combination blades as not - but I honestly don't know.
The ATB / ATBR nomemclature caught my eye as a feature I know to little about but know I need learn and would appreciate any lessons shared here.
Funny thing, I think I starte with a "chop saw" as I called my Miter Saw when I first got it. Then, I beleive I got the RAS and then my first Table Saw.
I suspect I managed to employ each to do things no "respectable" woodworker would use them for and "hand tools" were always a bit too time consuming for my proects.
(from what I read here) Ripping blades seem best for the TS's "default" blade and Cross Cut blades for the RAS and Miter Saws.
The Tooth Geometry mentioned here and elsewhere would appear to be independant of the tool and dependant upon the material or task. Any clarifications on these points would be appreiated.
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On Fri, 01 Jan 2010 15:55:55 -0800, Hoosierpopi wrote:

ATB is alternate top bevel. Each tooth is beveled to the left or right. The following tooth is beveled in the other direction. As you can imagine, it cuts a v-shaped groove.
ATBR is alternate top bevel with raker. After a set of ATB teeth, usually 4, there is a tooth ground straight across which cleans out the V and leaves a flat bottom.
Normally, a Forrest WWII is an ATB. But they have a "special grind" version that is an ATBR. So far, Freud doesn't have one of those in their fusion line, although they do in some of their older models.
On a slightly different topic, it's been mentioned that you don't need a thin kerf blade unless your saw is underpowered. In the main that's true. But when cutting something like segments for segmented bowl turning it sure saves wood - one ring may easily require a hundred saw cuts.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Thanks for the education on ATBR as well.
As for the thin kerf, is it also safe to assume they are used for TS bench top/portable models?
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On Fri, 01 Jan 2010 20:21:16 -0500, SBH wrote:

On any saw, a thin kerf blade will require less power for a same speed cut or, conversly, make the same cut faster with the same power. And, as I mentioned, they do save wood. Priced any ebony lately?
They have two drawbacks. In sustained use, they heat up faster than a thicker blade which increases the odds of warping. For most hobby woodworkers that's not a problem.
The second problem, at least in my mind, is that sometimes it's nice to have a consistent 1/8" kerf instead of something out to 3 decimal places. But unless you have almost zero runout you won't get that anyway, so it may be a moot point.
I've used thin kerf blades on a contractor saw for years. I had a rip, a crosscut, and a combination - all Freud. I finally got old and lazy and now I run the Fusion blade for everything. I've never owned a benchtop saw.
--
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