What is it? Set 444

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    Pinching off an IV feed?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2575)    Hmm ... the angles on the tips suggest that it is to slide     over something, but the grain at the far end of the notch will     make it too weak to have much holding power.
    At a guess -- it slides over something like the side panel of     a truck with a cross pin to bear in the flat surface of the fork     shown, where it should be strong enough.
2576)    A combination -- an opener for capped glass bottles of beer (or     soft drinks as well, but the wrong brand), and a wrench to work     on either a valve or the width adjustment on old roller skates.     Given the beer label on it, I would suspect that it is intended     to work the valve on a CO2 tank to feed a beer dispenser.
2577)    Looks like a valve for dumping the steam pressure on a steam     engine -- either a stationary one for powering a factory, or the     usual mobile one on rails. I think that it may also include a     pressure relief valve.
2578)    Well ... obviously a key. Presumably the 'V' in the handle has     some significance, but I don't know it.
    It could be the key to a tall clock case, or to a cedar chest     (hope chest), or something similar.
    The 'V' suggests "Volvo", but it does not look like a key to an     automobile. Wrong style -- a warded lock, instead of pin or     disc tumbler.
    I guess that it could fit an old style padlock.
2579)    Another combination tool. Hatchet, hammer, nail puller, and     the hook opposite the hatchet blade may be for breaking into a     door -- so it perhaps is a fireman's tool.
    I like the attachment of the blade to the shank. The impact of     using it as a hammer would tighten the fit rather than loosen     it. I would like to see the back side to see whether there is a     screw or nut to hold the hatchet blade onto the shank (and     attaching the hammer head), or whether the metal has simply been     riveted over.
2580)    Looks rather decorative. I think that it could serve to grip a     rope for making it easier to pull -- gripped between the knurled     half-circle and the swinging hook. The ball on the other end I     think is purely decorative. (This is two different woods, is it     not?) Otherwise, if metal, it could pivot on that ball.)
    Now to post this and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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'75: another guess: A gauge? possibly for thickness planing?
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You're right about it being a gauge but it wasn't for thickness planing, the answers can be seen at the link below:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/06/set-444.html#answers
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    I object to the specific clapboard suggestion, as they are tapered (always mounted with the thinner edge at the top), and the link you have there even shows the tool with the proper taper for the lumber in question.
    What you have shown might have been used for a similar purpose with plain planks, but not with clapboards. The one for clapboards does not even need the additional beveling at the entry, since it is already tapered, but one for constant thickness planks would need the bevels shown on your tool for ease of starting onto the plain plank.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Not sure if the taper in the gauge is necessary or not, but I included in my answer that this tool could also be used for regular boards.
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    I feel that the taper *is* necessary to grip equally at top and bottom of the board. Without that, it could shift as you are drawing the line.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Well, there sure isn't any easily found information on the web to explain the making of a clapboard preacher, though I think most people made their own from scrap wood.
I totally forgot to mention that I'll be posting on Wednesday this week instead of the usual Thursday.
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On 6/10/12 11:17 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

If you had an assistant to hold the other end of the clapboard, you could hold the gauge. That seems more straightforward than expecting the gauge to grip. If the closed end of the gauge were down, you could use the gauge to support the clapboard with one hand, and scribe with the other. In that case, the gauge could not be tapered.
If the scribe were a dull blade with a sharp point, it could slide along the face of the gauge, and it wouldn't matter if the gauge fit the clapboard snugly. Using a pencil, the carpenter might have his assistant rotate the clapboard four degrees or so for a snug fit against the gauge. The carpenter could also use the gauge to mark the thick bottom of the clapboard, then lay the board on sawhorses and use a square.
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