What is it? Set 272

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Nahmie wrote:

This hay loader had ropes stapled to the slats to keep the hay from falling through. My dad had this same loader and found it worked very good for loading peas also.
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I think that first one is an old memograph machine. Remember that nasty smell the ink used to give off.
I think the second or third from last might be a tube end expander.

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1543 Mimeograph machine 1545 Some sort of gauge? 1546 Hay Loader (probably horse drawn) 1547 Movie camera of some sort (Japanese?)
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1543)    Spirit duplicator. Hectograph, Mimeograph, various other names.
    Gelatin in a pan or attached to a backing which wraps around the     drum. (Not sure which style this is for sure.) Ink soaks into     the gelatin from the master (sort of a reversed carbon paper     using an ink which dissolves in alcohol.)
    The paper is wet with alcohol and rolled over the wax to pick up     the images. I think that the black cylinder around the central     shaft is the reservoir for the alcohol, and spays it on the     paper as it rotates, making this one with the gelatin in a pan     below it.
    They used to use these to make the tests handed out in school     when I was in about the sixth grade (1955?) and probably quite a     while before that -- but that was when I noticed how the     machines worked. :-)
1544)    No clue as to the function of this -- except that it appears to     fold up into a box, so it is portable.
    It almost looks like the left extending paddle is for attaching     bait to -- for some kind of box trap, perhaps?
1545)    This looks like a wrench for a certain kind of wristwatch back     with multiple flats for wrenching it open. Loosen the knob to     the right, slide the right jaw to about the right position, then     use the knurled knob to the left to tighten the moving jaws     visible on the first photo to clamp onto the watch back prior to     unscrewing it.
    The tongue to the side (near the jaws) bottom on the upper     photo, and the extension out the small end of the handle would     work as case knives to open snap-in watch cases.
1546)    Conveyer for moving cut hay into the wagon bed?
1547)    Hmm ... an interesting device. Oriental markings (Chinese,     Japanese, or what?)
    The silver handle is a cocking lever to set a strong spring.     Looks as though it ratchets so you give multiple strokes to wind     a large flat spring like a clock spring on steroids in the     housing under the lever.
    The trigger releases it -- everything, or a single power stroke     worth.
    Something goes in the windowed chamber above the muzzle contains     whatever it drives.
    It looks as though the key near the middle winds up the     auto-loader for whatever goes in the chamber.
    Whether it launches a projectile, drives a stud or stake into     something, or even happens to be a strange camera is not clear     to me, though it would probably become more clear if I had it in     my hands. :-)
1548)    O.K. The taper pin could expand it to lock inside a hole.
    Or -- it could be used with a hydraulic press to crimp a ferrule     to secure a fitting to a hydraulic hose.
    By removing numbered segments, you can adjust it for smaller     hoses and ferrules.
-----)    (No number?)
    Looks as though it slides on a notched pole. The shorter stick     engages the notchers to keep it from sliding down. The longer     one cams the shorter one out of enagement to allow it to slide.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Rich Grise wrote:

I didn't look at the pictures, but if it goes around the neck to prevent going thru fences, it's a yoke, not hobble(s).
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