What is it? (Amateur version POST03)

Hi, Here is the third post in the series. I will try to answer questions about their composition, size and how they can move. Pictures are provide via dro pbox. I changed the format so that there is one composite image per tool.
POST03_TOOL09 https://www.dropbox.com/s/0nph0l0osl7g11u/POST03_TOOL09_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal. It produces a hole approximately 1/8 inch in diameter. There is a slide to close or open to fill or empty the storage compartment. The spring is a compression spring and requires approximately three pounds of force. I have obscured the Patent Number and the stamped name on the to ol as it would be too easy with them shown.
POST03_TOOL10 https://www.dropbox.com/s/pzv2dk1y2shesud/POST03_TOOL10_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal and it is approximately twelve inches long. The pinching ends are shaped like small spoons. When closed, there is still some abilit y to apply additional pressure but it is not too great as the handles have some give and there is no mechanical advantage.
POST03_TOOL11 https://www.dropbox.com/s/ko73myy1vnt0ps7/POST03_TOOL11_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal with rubber/plastic on the handles. It has a latch to ke ep it closed when not in use. An expansion spring inside one of the handles forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a cou ple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring. As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed tool for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner sid e of one handle.
POST03_TOOL12 https://www.dropbox.com/s/nkx3ihfq44ho0h2/POST03_TOOL12_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 The preserved parts of this tool are iron and are approximately four feet l ong. It was not well taken care of before I got it and a wooden piece that fit through the hole had rotted away. It looked to have been a smooth round pole about three feet long with a diameter to match the hole.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Looks like a ticket punch. The compartment is to prevent the chads from littering all over the place.

Specialized forceps for some particular medical procedure?
John
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On 03/04/2015 3:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Graham
--
The wife has been missing a week now.
Police said to prepare for the worst.
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 4/3/2015 5:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

in the way.

--
Jeff

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On 4/04/2015 8:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Ticket punch. They are still used in buses in some European countries.

Stamp tweezer. Used mostly by stamp collectors.

Aviation tin snips

This one got me stumped.
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On 03/04/2015 8:22 PM, Noons wrote:

--





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On 4/3/2015 3:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

http://www.dogpile.com/search/images?q=ticket%20punch&fcoid@8&fcop=left&fpid=2

http://www.dogpile.com/search/images?fcoidA7&fcop=topnav&fpid=2&q=forceps&ql
http://www.dogpile.com/search/images?fcoidA7&fcop=topnav&fpid=2&q=aviation+shear&ql
in to melt in a forge???
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On Friday, April 3, 2015 at 5:46:01 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

es forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a c ouple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring. As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed too l for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner s ide of one handle.

Are the handles red or orange...I can't tell from the pictures, but I'll gu ess red.
If red, left cut aviation shears. If orange, speciality cut snips - cable cutter, hardened materials, etc.
Scroll to the bottom of this page:
http://midwestsnips.com/pdfs/select_snip.pdf
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They look like straight cut, flat sheet metal with one jaw flat on the table under the cut line. I have both flat and left cutting circle cutters. Martin
On 4/5/2015 7:24 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

An expansion spring inside one of the handles forces it back to the open position if not latched.
It only requires a couple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring.
As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed tool for its use.
There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner side of one handle.

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On Sunday, April 5, 2015 at 8:24:18 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

dles forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a couple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring . As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed t ool for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner side of one handle.

Understandable as I'm looking at them and would say I'm only 90% sure they should be classified as Red. Thanks for the link. Larry

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Thanks for the informative posts. The answers I have so far are given below .
POST03_TOOL09 https://www.dropbox.com/s/0nph0l0osl7g11u/POST03_TOOL09_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal. It produces a hole approximately 1/8 inch in diameter. There is a slide to close or open to fill or empty the storage compartment. The spring is a compression spring and requires approximately three pounds of force. I have obscured the Patent Number and the stamped name on the to ol as it would be too easy with them shown.
This is a VINTAGE McGILL UTILITY PUNCH PATENT # 1641521 RAILROAD CONDUCTOR TICKET PUNCHER w/Box like the one pictured here: http://www.ecrater.com/p/3118719/vintage-mcgill-utility-punch-patent-1641 521
POST03_TOOL10 https://www.dropbox.com/s/pzv2dk1y2shesud/POST03_TOOL10_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal and it is approximately twelve inches long. The pinching ends are shaped like small spoons. When closed, there is still some abilit y to apply additional pressure but it is not too great as the handles have some give and there is no mechanical advantage.
This is likely a forceps. It looks a lot like the antique Urology Foceps he re
http://antiquescientifica.com/urology_forceps_lithotomy_Tiemann.jpg
but it lacks the barbs and is not of good quality stainless steel or nickel . It may be a pair of chemistry forceps.
POST03_TOOL11 https://www.dropbox.com/s/ko73myy1vnt0ps7/POST03_TOOL11_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 This tool is metal with red rubber/plastic on the handles. It has a latch t o keep it closed when not in use. An expansion spring inside one of the han dles forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a couple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring . As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed t ool for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner side of one handle.
This is a Diamond Brand Compound Cutter (Offset left-cut aviation shears). A different brand is pictured here http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/aviation-regularoffsetbulldog/offset-le ft-cutting-aviation-snips
POST03_TOOL12 https://www.dropbox.com/s/nkx3ihfq44ho0h2/POST03_TOOL12_PICALL.JPG?dl=0 The preserved parts of this tool are iron and are approximately four feet l ong. It was not well taken care of before I got it and a wooden piece that fit through the hole had rotted away. It looked to have been a smooth round pole about three feet long with a diameter to match the hole.
This tool is an Auger/Post Hole Digger. http://toolmonger.com/2008/09/24/iwan-auger/ One poster noted it would be good for clayey soil.
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